6 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. and free of globals

      Ah! This remark highlights a fundamental difference in understanding between two camps, which I have been (painfully) aware of, but the source of this confusion has eluded me until only just right now. (Really, this is a source of frustration going back years.)

      In one camp, the advice "don't use global variables" is a way of attacking a bunch of things endemic to their use, most notably unnecessary coupling to spooky state. In another camp "no global variables" is understood to mean literally that and taken no further—so you can have as much spookiness as you like, and so long as the value is not directly accessible (visible) from, say, another given piece of code appearing at the top-level ("global") context, as with the way i is bound to the activation record in this example but is not accessible outside the scope of getGetNext, then you're good.

      That is, there are two aspects to variables: visibility and extent, and the first interpretation seeks to avoid the negative effects on both dimensions, while the second is satisfied by narrowly prohibiting direct visibility across boundaries.

      I find the latter interpretation bizarre and completely at odds with the spirit of the exhortation for avoiding globals in the first place.

      (What's worse is the the second interpretation usually goes hand in hand with the practice of making extensive use of closures, which because they are propped up as being closely associated with functions, then leads people to regretfully refer to this style as functional programming. This is a grave error—and, to repeat, totally at odds with the spirit of the thing.)

  2. Jul 2022
    1. The thing that bugs me when I listen to the Muse podcast—it's something that's present here along with the episode with gklitt—is that there's this overarching suggestion that the solution to this is elusive or that there are platform constraints (especially re the Web) that keep any of these things from being made. But lots of what gets talked about here is possible today, it's just that no one's doing it, because the software development practices that have captured the attention of e.g. GitHub and Programmer Twitter value things that go against the grain of these desires. This is especially obvious in the parts that mention dealing with files. You could write your Web app to do that. So go do it! Even where problems exist, like with mobile OSes (esp. iOS), there're things like remoteStorage. Think remoteStorage sucks? Fine! Go embrace and extend it and make it work. It's not actually a technical problem at this point.

  3. May 2022
    1. The problem is that a lot of old school website devs can write jQuery and very very little actual JavaScript.

      This happens to be true of many of the new/up-to-date Web developers I see, too.

      Anecdote: I never really did StackOverflow, either as a reader or a contributor. One day several years ago (well after StackOverflow had taken off), I figured that since I see people complain about JS being confusing all the time and since I know JS well, then I'd go answer a bunch of questions. The only problem was that when I went to the site and looked at the JS section, it was just a bunch of jQuery and framework shit—too much to simply ignore and try to find the ones that were actually questions about JS-the-language. "I know," I thought. "I'm in the JS section. I'll just manually rewrite the URL to jump to the ECMAScript section, which surely exists, right? So I did that, and I just got redirected to the JS section...

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    1. memory usage and (lack of) parallelism are concerns

      Memory usage is a concern? wat

      It's a problem, sure, if you're programming the way NPMers do. So don't do that.

      This is a huge problem I've noticed when it comes to people programming in JS—even, bizarrely, people coming from other languages like Java or C# and where you'd expect them to at least try to continue to do things in JS just like they're comfortable doing in their own language. Just because it's there (i.e. possible in the language, e.g. dynamic language features) doesn't mean you have to use it...

      (Relevant: How (and why) developers use the dynamic features of programming languages https://users.dcc.uchile.cl/~rrobbes/p/EMSE-features.pdf)

      The really annoying thing is that the NPM style isn't even idiomatic for the language! So much of what the NodeJS camp does is so clearly done in frustration and the byproduct of a desire to work against the language. Case in point: the absolutely nonsensical attitude about always using triple equals (as if to ward off some evil spirits) and the undeniable contempt that so many have for this.

  4. May 2021