113 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. the key method for conformation comparison used in this artical is wrong, so the result is not very informative.

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    1. But the business model that we now call surveillance capitalism put paid to that, which is why you should never post anything on Facebook without being prepared to face the algorithmic consequences.

      I'm reminded a bit of the season 3 episode of Breaking Bad where Jesse Pinkman invites his drug dealing pals to a Narcotics Anonymous-type meeting so that they can target their meth sales. Fortunately the two low lifes had more morality and compassion than Facebook can manage.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20kpzC3sckQ

    1. In fact, developers often tend to forget a simple, almost elementary fact: if users want to close the application or leave a site, they will — doesn’t matter which obstacles are placed on their path to the exit-button. The more obstacles there are the more negative the user experience will be.
    2. Users also don’t like to deal with dozens of opened tabs and some visitors tend to become quickly angry with the disabled back button. Furthermore, some visitors may not even realize that a new window was opened and hit the back-button mercilessly — without any result. That’s not user-friendly, and that’s not a good user experience we, web designers, strive for.
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. The administration and its allies fear that the more people gravitate toward the successful, free-market self-insurance approach, the worse their government-engineered health “reform” will look. We’re already seeing the beginning of this trend.
    1. revenue

      Why not just call it "total"?

    2. category

      Category sounds like something broader that would contain this product, not a variant of this product (and therefore more specific than the product 'name').

      "variant" would have been a better choice

    1. Unscrupulous providers are incentivized to use inefficient or malicious means to increase break/fix work and thus increase their revenue.
    1. While this is illegal and can result in criminal and civil penalties, your cooperation may make you eligible for up to a US$50,000 reward.

      Might not this motivate someone to conspire with someone else, one to commit the crime and one to collect the reward? Probably mitigated by a contingency that the reward may only be collected if criminal is successfully charged and prosecuted?

    1. This is it. I'm done with Page Translator, but you don't have to be. Fork the repo. Distribute the code yourself. This is now a cat-and-mouse game with Mozilla. Users will have to jump from one extension to another until language translation is a standard feature or the extension policy changes.
    2. Mozilla will never publicly ask users to circumvent their own blocklist. But it's their actions that are forcing people to do so.
    3. So to me, it seems like they want to keep their users safer by... making them use Google Chrome or... exposing themselves to even greater danger by disabling the whole blocklist.
  4. Apr 2020
    1. Qian’s comments reflected Luckin’s obsessive drive to overtake Starbucks, one of the most successful U.S. companies in China. Starbucks opened its first coffee shop in the country in 1999 and now has 4,300 of them. By the time of its initial public offering, not even two years after its founding, Luckin was more than halfway to matching the market leader.

      “We have done what most people do in 15 or 20 years,” Luckin Chief Financial Officer Reinout Schakel told CNBC on the morning of the Nasdaq debut.

      China consumes nine times as much tea as coffee, but Qian saw that statistic as an opportunity. According to an account in Xinhua, the official state news service, she was drinking more and more coffee during long hours at her previous job and grew interested in why coffee hadn’t caught on in China as in other countries and why its cost was so high.

      Until 2017, neither Qian nor Luckin’s chairman and largest shareholder, Charles Zhengyao Lu, had much to do with coffee shops. Lu studied industrial electric automation at the University of Science and Technology in Beijing and worked for the government in the northern city of Shijiazhuang for three years before getting the business itch. He started and ran a string of companies in information technology, telecommunications and automobile services.

      “Entrepreneurship is like a marathon without an end,” he said at an award ceremony for China’s biggest business names in 2016.

      His most successful venture at the time was CAR Inc., a car-rental company that had U.S. financing from Hertz and Warburg Pincus, the private equity firm. It listed on the Hong Kong stock exchange in 2014, and within eight months, its stock value had nearly doubled. The boom was short-lived — the share price dropped below its initial offering price by the beginning of 2016 — but by then Lu, along with Hertz and Warburg Pincus, had sold the bulk of their stakes.

      When Qian stepped up to the Nasdaq podium on May 17, 2019, Luckin had been in operation for just 20 months. Its $17 a share public offering raised another $645 million, and its underwriters included CICC, Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse.

      On January 7, the company said it had more than 4,500 stores, enough to overtake Starbucks in China.

      Howard Penney, an analyst for the online financial program Hedgeye Risk Management, summed up the optimism surrounding the company’s story line. On Jan. 15, he said that Starbucks would never be able to compete with Luckin in China, and might as well try to acquire it. Penney called Luckin “the most digitally savvy company in the world.”

      Two days later, Luckin’s stock hit its all-time high, just above $51 a share, pushing its market value past $12 billion.

      “China is to stock fraud,” he likes to say, “as Silicon Valley is to technology.”

    1. the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent.

      The way "common law" sounds and is used, I would have thought it meant law that is common (in common between) many countries, laws that can be found on the books in all of these many places. (Kind of like commonwealth.)

      But, although it is common to many countries, that is not its defining characteristic. Its defining characteristic is actually something quite different.

      Since the term is so far removed from what it actually means, I would even go so far as to say it is a mild euphemism.

      Much better names for this exist: judicial precedent or judge-made law are the clearest options. But even "case law" is a better term.

    1. Suddenly even linking to data was an excuse to get raided by the FBI and potentially face serious charges. Even more concerning is that Brown linked to data that was already public and others had already linked to.
    2. Having said all that, I think this is completely absurd that I have to write an entire article justifying the release of this data out of fear of prosecution or legal harassment. I had wanted to write an article about the data itself but I will have to do that later because I had to write this lame thing trying to convince the FBI not to raid me.
    3. I could have released this data anonymously like everyone else does but why should I have to? I clearly have no criminal intent here. It is beyond all reason that any researcher, student, or journalist have to be afraid of law enforcement agencies that are supposed to be protecting us instead of trying to find ways to use the laws against us.
    4. The key change here is the removal of an intent to defraud and replacing it with willfully; it will be illegal to share this information as long as you have any reason to know someone else might use it for unauthorized computer access.It is troublesome to consider the unintended consequences resulting from this small change.
    5. The problem is that it is that the laws themselves change the very definition of a criminal and put many innocent professionals at risk.
    1. If you force people to frequently change their passwords, they will use bad passwords.
    2. Stop forcing users to change their passwords every 30, 60, or 90 days, and stop forcing users to include a mixture of uppercase, lowercase, and special charactersForcing users to change their passwords should only happen if there is reason to believe an organization has been breached, or if a new third-party data breach affects employees or users.
    1. Once common practice, websites emailing you your password is now severely frowned upon. You'd often see this happen if you'd forgotten your password: you go to the "forgot password page", plug in your email address and get it delivered to your inbox. In fact, this is such a bad practice that there's even a website dedicated to shaming others that do this.
  5. Mar 2020
    1. Google Analytics Premium (later to be renamed Google Analytics 360)

      Google Analytics Premium was a better name, because it is very clear what it is.

      Google Analytics 360 sounds dumb to me. What does 360 have to do with anything?

      Reminds me Xbox Live 360 (and, though an unrelated number, Office 365). Are they copying Microsoft?

      Reminds me of YouTube Red. Where do they come up with this stuff?

    1. It won't let me go beyond this page. I'm sure I've answered the CAPTCHA correctly at least some of the 10+ times I've tried. What's going on?

      I can't even access their static website to find contact information for how to contact them about this problem!

    1. Robots are currently suffering extreme discrimination due to a few false assumptions, mainly that they’re distinctly separate actors from humans. My point of view is that robots and humans often need to behave in the same way, so it’s a fruitless and pointless endeavour to try distinguishing them.
    1. The deceitful obfuscation of commercial intention certainly runs all the way through the data brokering and ad tech industries that sit behind much of the ‘free’ consumer Internet. Here consumers have plainly been kept in the dark so they cannot see and object to how their personal information is being handed around, sliced and diced, and used to try to manipulate them.
    2. From an ad tech perspective, the concern is that manipulation doesn’t work when it’s obvious. And the goal of targeted advertising is to manipulate people’s decisions based on intelligence about them gleaned via clandestine surveillance of their online activity (so inferring who they are via their data). This might be a purchase decision. Equally it might be a vote.
    1. For years, the most used solution was to add an ugly captcha to the form, with some hard to read letters, numbers etc on an image. The user had to type these in an input field. The spambots have a hard time reading these images: problem solved!But this solution is not very user-friendly: it’s ugly, and annoys users so much you might lose conversions.
  6. Feb 2020
    1. When our analysts discovered six vulnerabilities in PayPal – ranging from dangerous exploits that can allow anyone to bypass their two-factor authentication (2FA), to being able to send malicious code through their SmartChat system – we were met with non-stop delays, unresponsive staff, and lack of appreciation. Below, we go over each vulnerability in detail and why we believe they’re so dangerous. When we pushed the HackerOne staff for clarification on these issues, they removed points from our Reputation scores, relegating our profiles to a suspicious, spammy level. This happened even when the issue was eventually patched, although we received no bounty, credit, or even a thanks. Instead, we got our Reputation scores (which start out at 100) negatively impacted, leaving us worse off than if we’d reported nothing at all.

      Paypal is a bad company in many ways. This is one of them.

    1. Automation helps us keep these steps out of our way while maintaining control through fast feedback loops (context-switching is our enemy).
  7. Jan 2020
  8. Dec 2019
    1. Personally, I think that the likelihood that one diet is the right diet for every human being is nonsense. There are lots of healthy diets, some vegan, some vegetarian, some omnivorous. I don't have a quarrel with those who avoid meat or dairy products. I do have a quarrel with those who claim they have the evidence to prove that meat and dairy products cause cancer and should be avoided altogether. The evidence isn't compelling and cherry-picking studies to support your lifestyle isn't healthy, either.

      A nice quote on the variability of humans & their best diets.

    1. pecial action-based dependency injection

      DO NOT USE IT. Can tie your own hands. Rely on normal DI.

  9. Nov 2019
    1. This blog is aimed to help you figure out the most common UX fails that breakdown the mobile experience. Make sure to learn from the mistakes done by others and create a UX that would be loved and appreciated by the majority of your target audience.

  10. Oct 2019
    1. The pay package Tesla promised to Elon Musk was so large, we had to add an extra dimension to the chart below to display it accurately

      It would be relevant here and should be mentioned that Elon Musk's compensation is conditioned on enormous growth of the company, and he receives nothing if that does not happen.

    1. Elon Musk, with a $2.3 billion package

      More accurately: $0 package, UNLESS value of company goes up 18 fold, to $650 billion, at which point it seems fair to let him have 0.5% of that....

      Makes one wonder if the other pay packages are equally misrepresented, here, and perhaps the entire conclusion is flawed.

  11. Sep 2019
  12. Aug 2019
    1. Both artists, through annotation, have produced new forms of public dialogue in response to other people (like Harvey Weinstein), texts (The New York Times), and ideas (sexual assault and racial bias) that are of broad social and political consequence.

      What about examples of future sorts of annotations/redactions like these with emerging technologies? Stories about deepfakes (like Obama calling Trump a "dipshit" or the Youtube Channel Bad Lip Reading redubbing the words of Senator Ted Cruz) are becoming more prevalent and these are versions of this sort of redaction taken to greater lengths. At present, these examples are obviously fake and facetious, but in short order they will be indistinguishable and more commonplace.

  13. Jul 2019
    1. but Salt Lake City’s cost of living is 16 percent lower than in Denver, 37 percent lower than Seattle’s and 48 percent under San Francisco’s, according to PayScale. The state — often led personally by Governor Gary Herbert — pitches its advantages well to firms considering relocation, says Joe Vranich, whose consulting firm helps small businesses looking to move. “They will roll out the carpet for you and treat you like a king.” The approach is working. Utah’s “Silicon Slopes”

      Utah's low cost of living attracts tech companies to operate in Utah. This will make more outsiders to relocate to Utah for jobs which can further aggravate the burden of housing shortage and pricing.

  14. May 2019
    1. Elon Musk, with a $2.3 billion package

      More accurately: $0 package, UNLESS value of company goes up 18 fold, to $650 billion, at which point it seems fair to let him have 0.5% of that....

      Makes one wonder if the other pay packages are equally misrepresented, here, and perhaps the entire conclusion is flawed.

    1. The pay package Tesla promised to Elon Musk was so large, we had to add an extra dimension to the chart below to display it accurately

      It would be relevant here and should be mentioned that Elon Musk's compensation is conditioned on enormous growth of the company, and he receives nothing if that does not happen.

    1. According to Australian Bureau of Statistics, in the 36 years between 1978 and 2014, 113 people died from terrorism, but this year alone 730 will die from domestic violence—i.e. on average two women each week—and around 2,500 people will take their own lives.

      bad argument IMO - completely irrelevant to main point as this compares terrorism on a whole to other crimes, as opposed to comparing islamic terrorism to terrorism on a whole

    2. That is, deaths from terrorism account for 0.025 of the total number of murders, or 2.5%

      Irrelevant statistics IMO

  15. Apr 2019
  16. Feb 2019
    1. Cure of those El'ils

      A medicinal model of education. "Hi, I'm Thomas Sheridan. All these dumbasses are hopelessly lost because they don't speak correctly. They'll never do anything good, or see what good is, because bad speech runs rampant. The only hope is to heal them by teaching them to speak well. That is, like me."

    1. Managing and maintaining the privacy and security of your digital identity through behaviors and digital tool settings

      Staying safe online is the most important aspect of learning internet usage. Knowing the repercussions of online sharing and how if it gets into the wrong hands can turn very dangeruos, very fast can help us to stay safe and continue to present ourselves in a safe environment.

  17. Jan 2019
    1. The We Defense argues that there are two kinds of rhetoric, good and bad. The good kind is used in good causes, the bad kind in bad causes. Our kind is the good kind; the bad kindjs used by our opponents

      Is Lanham suggesting that the "Weak Defense" argues that rhetoricians have an "us" vs. "them" mentality?

  18. Dec 2018
    1. At pre-test, the control group showed relatively high scores on all quality measures. The mean score for function-based was 0.84, evidence-based was 0.84, and non-punishment-based was 0.96. The treatment group showed slightlylower pre-test scores in the areas of function-based (mean = 0.78) and evidence-based (mean = 0.78) and similar scoreson non-punishment-based (mean = 0.96)

      ceiling effect for control group

  19. Nov 2018
    1. Adult Graduate Student VoicesGood and Bad Learning Experiences

      This article reviews a longitudinal study of graduate students in a Master's degree program that collected both good and bad learning experiences. The comments collect from the participants resulted in themes that were repeated throughout all three years of comments. The comments were compiled to and reviewed to determine adult student perspectives on the learning process. The authors noted that their is a need to balance suppor of students with challenging students. This is a ground work of student perspective and requires further investigation to implement appropriate changes and then review student perspective after the changes.

      Rating: 7/10

  20. Apr 2018
  21. Mar 2018
    1. Despite marketing claims that some television programs and DVDs help infants and toddlers learn, recent studies show that TV provides only empty calories for a child’s growing brain. The following research brief reviews the evidence that parents and caregivers of young children should take television off the menu.
    1. Pediatricians are firmly against programing modified specifically for young children, particularly when it is utilized to market toys, games, dolls, unhealthy foods and other items to babies. Furthermore, television will discourage and replace reading. Reading needs much more thinking than TV, and we realize that perusing books encourages youngsters’ healthy brain improvement. Kids from families that have the TV on a lot invest less time reading and being read to and are less likely to be able to read.
    2. television is a bad influence on kids, because watching TV at an early age can affect children’s brain development. For instance, the early years of a youngster are important to their development.
  22. Feb 2018
    1. Reinforce your values. Point out words and behavior in popular TV shows, websites, and music that are both positive and negative examples of what you do and don't want your kids to model. What you say to your child is up to you, but have the discussion.
  23. Sep 2017
    1. How can we draw many different bootstrap samples from the original sample if each bootstrap sample must contain the same number of cases as the original sample? If we allow every case in the original sample to be sampled only once, each bootstrap sample contains all cases of the original sample, so it is an exact copy of the original sample. Thus, we cannot create different bootstrap samples.

      So, bootstrapping without replacement doesn't allow for ANY bootstrapping regardless of sample size?

  24. Feb 2017
  25. Jan 2017
    1. bad attitude

      Wow, that's judgemental. The "bad" attitude could be because many OER people don't like "walled gardens" where only those with money or membership get to learn.

  26. Jun 2016
    1. Two images of the same message. America is the way, the truth and the how. The first image shows how nurturing the United States can be, giving the people who are defenseless and feeble creatures a new take on life and feeding them some well deserve knowledge and information while their former way of living will lead to death. Quite arrogant of America to have this way of thinking but it was completely normal in this setting and time period. To the right is America being stern showing that we can offer a more sophisticated way to be. As you see what is presumed to be the european students learning, you see the african, native american and asian counterparts all in lesser positions in relation to their current living arrangements. Two extreme interpretations and only time can tell what is best for those individuals. The way that the world has evolved, it is hard to argue if that it was best for those countries to conform but as America has grown and become political aware, we are one of the better countries for anyone to be apart of.

  27. Feb 2016
    1. The author almost realized the much more important conclusion of the fact he lived. He shouldn't conclude the article by asking "what is the purpose of studying maths?" and then giving an three stupid answers.

      He should have asked: is this actually "knowledge" as they say academia brings to society? Is the money researchers earn being well spent? Did I actually deserve to be remunerated by this piece of work no one understands -- and, in fact, no one has read except for maybe three people?

  28. Aug 2015
    1. Here, on page 2, a study on infrasound conducted by Mr. Richard James is referenced. Mr. Richard James references Nina Pierpont's "Wind Turbine Syndrome" in articles he has written, namely "Wind Turbine Infra and Low-Frequency Sound: Warning Signs That Were Not Heard," see this link. Wind turbine syndrome is not a real medical syndrome, see this link and this link. In fact, Mr. Richard James and his methodologies for measuring sound has been discredited in a Michigan court, see Rick James – A Technical Discussion of His Deposition and Testimony in the Spencer / Kobetz Lawsuit.

      On page 7, we learn that Mr. Richard James trained a field technician to set up sound measuring equipment at a dozen homes within the Shirley Wind Farm. It's unclear if Mr. Richard James was present to ensure set up and staging of equipment was per professional protocol. The trained field technician is stated to live within the Shirley Wind Farm. Mr. Richard James also collected weather data using a website called wonderground.com [sic]. Note that the field technician didn't record weather data via actual observation while domiciled within the Shirley Wind Farm. Also to consider is the likelihood of gaps in the collection of data, "On many occasions, there was an observer recording the events of the turbines..." This sounds fuzzy. Brings doubt to the reliability of collected data.

      On page 13, the Brown County Board of health declares the Shirley Wind Farm a human health hazard.

      As a result of Brown County's declaration, the Governor of Wisconsin will spend $250,000 to study health effects of wind power.

  29. Jun 2015
    1. Laboratory analysis of those samples found compounds that are toxic to humans, including acetone and methylene chloride — powerful industrial solvents — along with oil.

      In what concentrations? "Toxic" is pretty meaningless.

  30. Apr 2015
    1. Do your research elsewhere.

      Again, not bad advice, but for the wrong reasons.

      Wikipedia is a good starting point and a great place to get a reasonably reliable overview. The real resource that Wikipedia provides is the Citations and References sections. These are the sources for the detail in the article and recommended further reading to get to the guts of what you're researching.

      Other sources are always recommended. More reliable references are always a good thing and being able to get them cited in a Wikipedia article is a good way of giving extra validation given the process required to get something added to an article. It makes the Wikipedia article better and will cause the source article to appear higher in search results also.

    2. Never link to Wikipedia from your website.

      This is a fair thing to ask of people. The explanation is flawed and the advise is a little too firm but in general it is not bad.

      If you are referencing a general topic linking to Wikipedia is fine.

      If you are referencing a specific thing you should link to the source material rather than a general article. Chances are reasonably good that if your source material is well researched you could get it added to the sources in the Wikipedia article and maybe even update the general article too.

      Wikipedia has rules around editing that ensure factually correct information makes it through. Editing can be challenging but if you adhere to these editing can be quite rewarding.

  31. Sep 2013
    1. I mean to say, does he really know anything of what is good and evil, base or honourable, just or unjust in them; or has he only a way with the ignorant of persuading them that he not knowing is to be esteemed to know more about these things than some one else who knows?

      Dangers of persuasive rhetoric

    2. Suppose a man to have been trained in the palestra and to be a skilful boxer,—he in the fulness of his strength goes and strikes his father or mother or one of his familiars or friends; but that is no reason why the trainers or fencing-masters should be held in detestation or banished from the city;—surely not. For they taught their art for a good purpose, to be used against enemies and evil-doers, in self-defence not in aggression, and others have perverted their instructions, and turned to a bad use their own strength and skill. But not on this account are the teachers bad, neither is the art in fault, or bad in itself; I should rather say that those who make a bad use of the art are to blame

      An interesting argument in defense of rhetoric.