16 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2021
  2. Mar 2021
  3. Sep 2020
    1. make on-street parking expensive (to reflect its real costs) and to make transit cheap or free. The way we price transit, and don’t price private car storage in the public realm, is evidence of “Asphalt Socialism“–subsidies for cars and driving, and high prices and penalties for those who take transit.

      Socialism for the oligarchs, the pointy end of capitalism for everyone else.

    2. the only places where transit really works well in the United States are in the areas where cities charge for parking.  When street parking is free, people own cars and drive, depriving transit systems of customers and revenue, and skewing the transit ridership to the dispossessed and powerless.

      Though NYC has probably the most comprehensive transit capabilities in the US, and it somehow fails to charge for parking permits. Surprisingly, SF appears to be the "big winner" here, $12/month for a parking permit and $81/month for a Muni pass. (However, in these pandemic times, I wonder how much buying monthly passes has decreased. And for a compact city, so much SF stuff still assumes you have a car.)

      Also of note: huge swaths of SF are SFH yet still have (one-car) garages so you don't have to park your (first) car on the street. Compare how many cars per household in SF, in the Bay Area, and contrast with NYC.

    3. on most streets, in most cities — including, bizarrely New York City — street parking is completely unpriced almost everywhere.  In effect, the prices shown for parking in Goodman’s sample overstate what city’s actually charge for parking: it’s mostly zero.

      $70 for a monthly transit pass vs. $2.25 for a monthly parking permit. I wonder what the price for a monthly parking permit averages out to among the cities that DO charge.

  4. Aug 2020
  5. Jun 2020
  6. Jan 2020
  7. Dec 2018
    1. 9 cities world wide have 24 hours service on some line every night. 14 cities world wide have 24 hours service on some line every weekends. Which lines, which nights, should it be in KL? https://twitter.com/sabre23t/status/1071943579025661955

  8. Mar 2017
    1. Bringing Bridj to Kansas City seemed like a no-brainer to transit officials. For just $1.50, anyone could use an app to summon a ride downtown in van that would follow a route calculated on the fly by an algorithm. No one within the service area was ever more than a 10 minute walk from a stop, and as an added incentive, your first 10 rides were free.

      Never heard of it.

  9. Oct 2016
    1. Once you pay for 12 full MiWay fares during any one-week (Monday to Sunday) using your PRESTO card, you can then ride free on MiWay for the remainder of that week!

      Those loyalty programs are pretty interesting. Wish the same existed for day and monthly passes.

  10. Sep 2016
    1. (Crazy app uptake + riding data + math wizardry = many surprises in store.)

      Like Waze for public transit? Way to merge official Open Data from municipal authorities with the power of crowdsourcing mass transportation.

  11. Jan 2016
    1. I only skimmed this, but I think I got the point. You move more people faster on escalators when none of them are reserved for walking -- simply because not enough people are willing or able to walk. If you have walking lanes, they are under-used, and the standing lanes are over-crowded.