2,386 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. 2021-09-01

    2. Cheek, N. N., Reutskaja, E., & Schwartz, B. (2021). Balancing the Freedom-Security Tradeoff During Crises and Disasters [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/8y2zt

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/8y2zt
    4. During crises and disasters, such as hurricanes, terrorist threats, or pandemics, policymakers must often increase security at the cost of freedom. Psychological science, however, has shown that the restriction of freedom may have strong negative consequences for behavior and health. We suggest that psychology can inform policy both by elucidating some negative consequences of lost freedom (e.g., depression or behavioral reactance) and by revealing strategies to address them. We propose four interlocking principles that can help policymakers restore the freedom-security balance. Careful consideration of the psychology of freedom can help policymakers develop policies that most effectively promote public health, safety, and well-being when crises and disasters strike.
    5. Balancing the Freedom-Security Tradeoff During Crises and Disasters
  2. Aug 2021
    1. 2021-08-18

    2. Latest Data on COVID-19 Vaccinations by Race/Ethnicity | KFF. (n.d.). Retrieved August 27, 2021, from https://www.kff.org/coronavirus-covid-19/issue-brief/latest-data-on-covid-19-vaccinations-race-ethnicity/

    3. As of this week, 72% of the adult population in the United States have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. While this progress represents a marked achievement in vaccinations that has led to steep declines in COVID-19 cases and deaths, vaccination coverage—and the protections provided by it—remains uneven across the country. With the growing spread of the more transmissible Delta variant, cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are once again rising, largely among unvaccinated people. While White adults account for the largest share (57%) of unvaccinated adults, Black and Hispanic people remain less likely than their White counterparts to have received a vaccine, leaving them at increased risk, particularly as the variant spreads.
    4. Latest Data on COVID-19 Vaccinations by Race/Ethnicity
    1. 2021-08-24

    2. Tim Plante, MD MHS on Twitter: “Just reported: About half of recent ICU patients with #Covid19 in #Vermont are vaccinated. Sounds like the vaccines aren’t working, right? WRONG. Vaccines are working and here’s why. But first, let’s talk a bit about unprotected sex. A thread. (Refs at the end.) 1/n https://t.co/iyQcfCDAfh” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 27, 2021, from https://twitter.com/tbplante/status/1430222978961317896

    3. Just reported: About half of recent ICU patients with #Covid19 in #Vermont are vaccinated. Sounds like the vaccines aren't working, right? WRONG. Vaccines are working and here's why. But first, let's talk a bit about unprotected sex. A thread. (Refs at the end.) 1/n
    1. 2021-08-13

    2. Rogers, J. P., Watson, C. J., Badenoch, J., Cross, B., Butler, M., Song, J., Hafeez, D., Morrin, H., Rengasamy, E. R., Thomas, L., Ralovska, S., Smakowski, A., Sundaram, R. D., Hunt, C. K., Lim, M. F., Aniwattanapong, D., Singh, V., Hussain, Z., Chakraborty, S., … Rooney, A. G. (2021). Neurology and neuropsychiatry of COVID-19: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the early literature reveals frequent CNS manifestations and key emerging narratives. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, jnnp-2021-326405. https://doi.org/10.1136/jnnp-2021-326405

    3. 10.1136/jnnp-2021-326405
    4. There is accumulating evidence of the neurological and neuropsychiatric features of infection with SARS-CoV-2. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to describe the characteristics of the early literature and estimate point prevalences for neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and CINAHL up to 18 July 2020 for randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies and case series. Studies reporting prevalences of neurological or neuropsychiatric symptoms were synthesised into meta-analyses to estimate pooled prevalence.13 292 records were screened by at least two authors to identify 215 included studies, of which there were 37 cohort studies, 15 case-control studies, 80 cross-sectional studies and 83 case series from 30 countries. 147 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The symptoms with the highest prevalence were anosmia (43.1% (95% CI 35.2% to 51.3%), n=15 975, 63 studies), weakness (40.0% (95% CI 27.9% to 53.5%), n=221, 3 studies), fatigue (37.8% (95% CI 31.6% to 44.4%), n=21 101, 67 studies), dysgeusia (37.2% (95% CI 29.8% to 45.3%), n=13 686, 52 studies), myalgia (25.1% (95% CI 19.8% to 31.3%), n=66 268, 76 studies), depression (23.0% (95% CI 11.8% to 40.2%), n=43 128, 10 studies), headache (20.7% (95% CI 16.1% to 26.1%), n=64 613, 84 studies), anxiety (15.9% (5.6% to 37.7%), n=42 566, 9 studies) and altered mental status (8.2% (95% CI 4.4% to 14.8%), n=49 326, 19 studies). Heterogeneity for most clinical manifestations was high.Neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 in the pandemic’s early phase are varied and common. The neurological and psychiatric academic communities should develop systems to facilitate high-quality methodologies, including more rapid examination of the longitudinal course of neuropsychiatric complications of newly emerging diseases and their relationship to neuroimaging and inflammatory biomarkers.psychiatryclinical neurologysystematic reviewsCOVID-19meta-analysisThis article is made freely available for use in accordance with BMJ’s website terms and conditions for the duration of the covid-19 pandemic or until otherwise determined by BMJ. You may use, download and print the article for any lawful, non-commercial purpose (including text and data mining) provided that all copyright notices and trade marks are retained.
    5. Neurology and neuropsychiatry of COVID-19: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the early literature reveals frequent CNS manifestations and key emerging narratives
    1. 2021-08-19

    2. Maftei, A., & Holman, A. C. (2021). SARS-CoV-2 Threat Perception and Willingness to Vaccinate: The Mediating Role of Conspiracy Beliefs. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 672634. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.672634

    3. 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.672634
    4. In the current exploratory study, we investigated the willingness of participants to vaccinate against the novel coronavirus [severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)] that has shaken up the world since the beginning of 2020. More specifically, we tested the mediating role of conspiracy beliefs (CBs) on the relationship between threat perception (TP) and willingness of participants to vaccinate against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), along with a series of associated demographic variables. Overall, 40% of our sample expressed total rejection of the COVID-19 vaccine. Our results suggested no significant differences in gender, age, educational level, and vaccine acceptance or hesitancy of participants. The results also indicated that CBs partially mediated the relationship between TP and willingness of participants to vaccinate. The current findings are discussed within the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework and their importance for public health communication and practices and building public trust within the global fight against COVID-19. We considered the present results as a valuable starting point in understanding the psychological constructs related to the extended model of TPB and other personal factors and addressed the attitudinal roots that shape the acceptance and rejection of COVID-19 vaccination.
    5. SARS-CoV-2 Threat Perception and Willingness to Vaccinate: The Mediating Role of Conspiracy Beliefs
    1. 2021-08-19

    2. Pham, Q. T., Le, X. T. T., Phan, T. C., Nguyen, Q. N., Ta, N. K. T., Nguyen, A. N., Nguyen, T. T., Nguyen, Q. T., Le, H. T., Luong, A. M., Koh, D., Hoang, M. T., Pham, H. Q., Vu, L. G., Nguyen, T. H., Tran, B. X., Latkin, C. A., Ho, C. S. H., & Ho, R. C. M. (2021). Impacts of COVID-19 on the Life and Work of Healthcare Workers During the Nationwide Partial Lockdown in Vietnam. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 563193. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.563193

    3. 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.563193
    4. Background: Healthcare workers are frontline responders facing a disproportionate increase in occupational responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Added work-related stress among healthcare personnel may lead to personal and work-related repercussions, such as burnout or decreased quality of care for patients; however, little is known about how the COVID-19 pandemic affects the daily work and life of these workers. This study aimed to evaluate the personal and occupational impacts of the COVID-19 induced partial lockdown in Vietnam among hospital staff. Methods: A cross-sectional web-based study was carried out to collect demographic data and the personal and job impacts of respondents during the second week of national lockdown in April 2020. Snowball sampling technique was applied to recruit 742 hospital staff. The exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was used to examine the validity of the instrument. Results: Of the 742 respondents, 21.2% agreed that “working attitude well-maintained,” followed by 16.1% of respondents who reported that there were “enough employees at work.” Only 3.2% of respondents agreed that “their work was appreciated by society.” Furthermore, healthcare workers in the central region were less likely to have experienced “Avoidance of disclosure and discrimination related to COVID-19” than other areas (Coef. = – 0.25, CI: −0.42 to −0.07). Being women also had a negative association with scores in “Avoidance of disclosure and discrimination related to COVID 19” domain (Coef. = −0.27, CI: −0.43 to −0.12) while having a positive association with “negative attitude towards working conditions” domain (Coef. = 0.19, CI: 0.09 to 0.3). In addition, working in administrative offices (Coef. = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.36) and infectious departments (Coef. = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.09 to 0.63) had a positive association with “Increased work pressure due to COVID 19” domain. Conclusion: These findings revealed marginal impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the work and life of hospital staff in Vietnam. Furthermore, this study highlighted the importance of implementing preventive strategies during the nationwide partial lockdown to manage hospital admissions and the burden on healthcare workers. Finally, this study characterizes targeted demographics that may benefit from appreciation by employers and society during a national pandemic.
    5. Impacts of COVID-19 on the Life and Work of Healthcare Workers During the Nationwide Partial Lockdown in Vietnam
    1. 2021-08-18

    2. Kaloeti, D. V. S., Ardhiani, L. N., & Stück, M. (2021). The Consequences of COVID-19 Toward Human Growth: The Role of Traumatic Event and Coping Strategies Among Indonesian Sample. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, 685115. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.685115

    3. 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.685115
    4. COVID-19 has brought a massive psychological impact on individuals' life. The current study sets a significant purpose to test the model whether post-traumatic stress and coping strategies affect stress-related growth regarding the COVID-19 event. One hundred and ninety-nine participants have participated in an online survey in the period of lockdown. The proposed hypotheses model is further tested using PLS-SEM. The first model explains a significant moderate, 46% amount of variance for stress-related growth. With gender as moderator, the second model explains a significant 29% amount of variance for stress-related growth, which is also moderate. This study shows that active coping strategies and positive affirmation significantly influence individual stress-related growth. The trauma event (COVID-19) does not significantly affect growth. Women experience trauma compared to men, besides active coping with the COVID-19 situation is higher in men than women. Using the Bio-centric perspective, having a positive connection through acceptance and awareness of the situation, self-care, and affective interaction with others would develop growth regarding traumatic situations. Further, interventions about coping skills and positive affirmations are essential to give, especially to vulnerable groups such as women.
    5. The Consequences of COVID-19 Toward Human Growth: The Role of Traumatic Event and Coping Strategies Among Indonesian Sample
    1. 2021-05-21

    2. Prof. Christina Pagel on Twitter: “THREAD latest on B.1.617.2 variant in England: B.1.617.2 (1st discovered in India) is now dominant in England. Here is a thread summarising latest PHE report and Sanger local data. TLDR: it is NOT good news. 1/7” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 24, 2021, from https://twitter.com/chrischirp/status/1399333330286415876

    3. PS: PHE report here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/990177/Variants_of_Concern_VOC_Technical_Briefing_13_England.pdf… Sanger data here: https://covid19.sanger.ac.uk/downloads I'm also kinda sick of people minimising this the whole time. The speed of spread has been so quick.
    4. We need to stop obsessing about 21st June and start worrying about where we are *now* and how we can get cases down *now*. Oh and massively discourage international travel - not least to protect other, less vaccinated, countries from this variant. https://twitter.com/chrischirp/status/1398955136756617219?s=20… 7/7
    5. Reported cases in England have risen 27% in last week. Hospital admissions to 26 May have risen 15%. Cases are going up steeply in many local authorities. https://twitter.com/julesmchamish/status/1399059877226504194?s=20… 6/7
    6. There are still reasons why this might be higher other than just higher transmissibility - but note this estimate has got *higher* since previous report, as more data has come in. Also, SAGE's bad scenarios start from 40% more transmissible variant. https://twitter.com/Dr_D_Robertson/status/1396568757892489217?s=20… 5/7Quote Tweet
    7. The PHE report last week also looked at "secondary attack rates" - chance that a close contact of a confirmed case will also test positive (NB contacts with no symptoms not necessarily tested) They estimate that person with B.1.617.2 is 67% more likely to infect a contact. 4/7
    8. B.1.617.2 is now dominant in almost every region of England. Even NE and Yorks are catching up very fast. 3/7
    9. Firstly, B.1.617.2 is now dominant in England. This data excludes traveller data and surge testing as much as possible. In absolute numbers, B.1.617.2 ("India") overtook B.1.1.7 ("Kent") about 15 May. PHE report estimates a few days earlier. 2/7
    10. THREAD latest on B.1.617.2 variant in England: B.1.617.2 (1st discovered in India) is now dominant in England. Here is a thread summarising latest PHE report and Sanger local data. TLDR: it is NOT good news. 1/7
    1. 2021-07-02

    2. Thorpe, A., Fagerlin, A., Butler, J., Stevens, V., Drews, F. A., Shoemaker, H., Riddoch, M., & Scherer, L. D. (2021). Communicating about COVID-19 vaccine development and safety [Preprint]. Public and Global Health. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.06.25.21259519

    3. 10.1101/2021.06.25.21259519
    4. Purpose Beliefs that the risks from the vaccine outweigh the risks from getting COVID-19 and concerns that the vaccine development process was rushed and lacking rigor have been identified as important drivers of hesitancy and refusal to get a COVID-19 vaccine. We tested whether messages designed to address these beliefs and concerns might promote intentions to get a COVID-19 vaccine.Method An online survey fielded between March 8-March 23, 2021 with US Veteran (n=688) and non-Veteran (n=387) respondents. In a between-subjects experiment, respondents were randomly assigned to a control group (with no message) or to read one of two intervention messages: 1. a fact-box styled message comparing the risks of getting COVID-19 compared to the vaccine, and 2. a timeline styled message describing the development process of the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines.Results Most respondents (60%) wanted a COVID-19 vaccine. However, 17% expressed hesitancy and 23% did not want to get a COVID-19 vaccine. The fact-box styled message and the timeline message did not significantly improve vaccination intentions, F(2,359)=0.91, p=.402, <img class="highwire-embed" alt="Embedded Image" src="https://www.medrxiv.org/sites/default/files/highwire/medrxiv/early/2021/07/02/2021.06.25.21259519/embed/inline-graphic-1.gif"/>, or reduce the time respondents wanted to wait before getting vaccinated, F(2,307)=0.76, p=.468, <img class="highwire-embed" alt="Embedded Image" src="https://www.medrxiv.org/sites/default/files/highwire/medrxiv/early/2021/07/02/2021.06.25.21259519/embed/inline-graphic-2.gif"/>, compared to no messages.Discussion We did not find an impact on vaccine intention based on providing information about vaccine risks and development. Further research is needed to identify how to effectively address concerns about the risks associated with COVID-19 vaccines and the development process and to understand additional factors that influence vaccine intentions.
    5. Communicating about COVID-19 vaccine development and safety
    1. 2021-08-18

    2. (2) David Fisman on Twitter: “Here’s some really simple modeling that hopefully will help provide some insight into why having a large, unvaccinated minority in Ontario is a problem for the population as a whole.” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 23, 2021, from https://twitter.com/DFisman/status/1427940663925092354

    3. Here's some really simple modeling that hopefully will help provide some insight into why having a large, unvaccinated minority in Ontario is a problem for the population as a whole.
    1. 2021-08-19

    2. (2) Dr Nicole E Basta on Twitter: “There is SO MUCH misunderstanding about what a #vaccine #mandate IS & what a vaccine mandate DOES. No one is calling for anyone to be banned. No one is calling for anyone to be forcibly vaccinated. Please, gather 'round and listen up, so you know what we’re talking about... 1/n” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 23, 2021, from https://twitter.com/IDEpiPhD/status/1428410251884302336?s=20

    3. There is SO MUCH misunderstanding about what a #vaccine #mandate IS & what a vaccine mandate DOES. No one is calling for anyone to be banned. No one is calling for anyone to be forcibly vaccinated. Please, gather 'round and listen up, so you know what we're talking about... 1/n
    1. 2021-08-18

    2. Pilditch, T. (2021). Why scientific evidence is no longer enough in public debate [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/98v2n

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/98v2n
    4. Many of the global problems humanity is facing concern acting appropriately given the available evidence. However, issues including climate change denial (McGlade and Ekins, 2015; Steffen et al., 2015) and anti-vaccination movements (Hargreaves, Lewis, and Speers, 2003; Petrovic, Roberts, and Ramsay, 2001) appear to run contrary to overwhelming evidence. The investigation of these issues has pointed to two possible causes; either insufficient exposure to the evidence at hand, or ulterior / biased motives5. Here I show such explanations are unnecessary, and further, why current counterarguments focussed on scientific evidence may not only be ineffective, but may backfire. I highlight that denialist arguments focusing on credibility-based attacks can provoke rational scepticism of the issue at hand, requiring a shift in counterargument strategy – away from the evidence itself. I show the maximally effective counterargument strategy is to separately and directly address credibility-attacks, salvaging both the immediate issue, and future debate.
    5. Why scientific evidence is no longer enough in public debate
    1. 2021-08-20

    2. Kai Kupferschmidt on Twitter: “One of the most important things I was looking for in reporting on #SARSCoV2 evolution was a way of making sense of all the virus variants, putting them in some framework. And one of the most useful things I found for that is this antigenic map. It’s worth explaining a bit: Https://t.co/miO8Kh9w9e” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 22, 2021, from https://twitter.com/kakape/status/1428650961652916230?s=20

    3. One of the most important things I was looking for in reporting on #SARSCoV2 evolution was a way of making sense of all the virus variants, putting them in some framework. And one of the most useful things I found for that is this antigenic map. It’s worth explaining a bit:
    1. 2021-08-15

    2. Skylark, W. J. (2021). When is there a more-credible effect? [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/7mysg

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/7mysg
    4. Hoorens and Bruckmüller (2015) reported that people are more likely to judge comparison statements to be true when the comparison is framed as \textit{A is more than B} than when it is framed as \textit{B is less than A}. Skylark (2021) recently provided further evidence for this \textit{more-credible effect}, but found that it did not emerge for all stimulus sets. In particular, there was very little effect of comparative when participants evaluated the truth of statements comparing the amount of land required to produce certain foodstuffs. The present report describes two further pre-registered studies that probe the generality of the more-credible effect. Study 1 used the same land-use comparisons as Skylark (2021) but increased the masses of the foodstuffs from 1 kilo to 1000 tons (the idea being that 'less than' framing might only reduce credibility when the compared quantities are large). A manipulation check found that the change in stated mass increased the subjective size of the items, but there was still little effect of comparative on judgments of truth: more-than statements were judged true about 3\% more often than less-than statements, and the effect was not reliably different from zero. Study 2 asked people to judge the truth of statements comparing the CO2 production of pairs of countries selected from the most polluting countries in the world. A modest, 'significant' more-credible effect emerged, with more-than framing boosting perceived truth by approximately 5\%. Exploratory cross-study comparison indicated that the more-credible effect did not meaningfully differ between the two studies. The factors that determine when, and how far, more-than framing boosts the credibility of comparative statements remains an important topic for inquiry.
    5. When is there a more-credible effect?
    1. 2021-06-07

    2. Kim, H., Rebholz, C. M., Hegde, S., LaFiura, C., Raghavan, M., Lloyd, J. F., Cheng, S., & Seidelmann, S. B. (2021). Plant-based diets, pescatarian diets and COVID-19 severity: A population-based case–control study in six countries. BMJ Nutrition, Prevention & Health, 4(1), 257–266. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjnph-2021-000272

    3. 10.1136/bmjnph-2021-000272
    4. Background Several studies have hypothesised that dietary habits may play an important role in COVID-19 infection, severity of symptoms, and duration of illness. However, no previous studies have investigated the association between dietary patterns and COVID-19.Methods Healthcare workers (HCWs) from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, USA) with substantial exposure to COVID-19 patients completed a web-based survey from 17 July to 25 September 2020. Participants provided information on demographic characteristics, dietary information, and COVID-19 outcomes. We used multivariable logistic regression models to evaluate the association between self-reported diets and COVID-19 infection, severity, and duration.Results There were 568 COVID-19 cases and 2316 controls. Among the 568 cases, 138 individuals had moderate-to-severe COVID-19 severity whereas 430 individuals had very mild to mild COVID-19 severity. After adjusting for important confounders, participants who reported following ‘plant-based diets’ and ‘plant-based diets or pescatarian diets’ had 73% (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.81) and 59% (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.99) lower odds of moderate-to-severe COVID-19 severity, respectively, compared with participants who did not follow these diets. Compared with participants who reported following ‘plant-based diets’, those who reported following ‘low carbohydrate, high protein diets’ had greater odds of moderate-to-severe COVID-19 (OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.13 to 13.24). No association was observed between self-reported diets and COVID-19 infection or duration.Conclusion In six countries, plant-based diets or pescatarian diets were associated with lower odds of moderate-to-severe COVID-19. These dietary patterns may be considered for protection against severe COVID-19.
    5. Plant-based diets, pescatarian diets and COVID-19 severity: a population-based case–control study in six countries
    1. 2021-08-05

    2. Youyang Gu on Twitter: “People were worried cases would spike further when the UK lifted almost all remaining restrictions in July. The opposite happened. We must acknowledge that restrictions aren’t all that effective in Western countries. (Except Australia, who just entered their 6th lockdown) https://t.co/l7tygXQqn7” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 13, 2021, from https://twitter.com/youyanggu/status/1423415277765734402

    3. As I didn't realize this thread would blow up, some additional clarifications: 1) My claim is based on my past analysis on the effectiveness of restrictions in the US: https://twitter.com/youyanggu/status/1397230156301930497… 2) Here is the original source which my Tweet was based from: https://businessinsider.com/uk-lifting-restrictions-increase-cases-euros-mystery-2021-8
    4. To clarify, I am not anti-lockdown. If lockdown/restrictions work and the benefits are worth the trade-offs, then I'm all for it. I just haven't seen solid evidence of causal effectiveness & a thorough discussion of the trade-offs. I'm anti-bad science.
    5. While cases in the UK reached similar levels as the Winter wave, deaths are less than 10% of the Winter wave. Unlike the fuzzy evidence on the effectiveness of restrictions, there is overwhelming evidence that vaccines are effective at reducing severe illness/death.
    6. Many bad papers looked at these curves in 2020 & concluded that more restrictions is followed by a decline in cases, when the decline would've happened regardless. If we apply the same flawed logic here, one can say that the lifting of restrictions is followed by fewer cases.
    7. It's interesting that some experts would rather question the accuracy of the data than acknowledge this reality.
    8. People were worried cases would spike further when the UK lifted almost all remaining restrictions in July. The opposite happened. We must acknowledge that restrictions aren't all that effective in Western countries. (Except Australia, who just entered their 6th lockdown)
    1. 2021-08-11

    2. André Picard on Twitter: “Most of those numbers are in the column, which focuses on a) the risk of the Delta variant to children under 12 and b) the 29% of Canadians who are not fully vaccinated. Brace yourself for more COVID-19 nastiness https://t.co/V0agVYvKRx” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 13, 2021, from https://twitter.com/picardonhealth/status/1425316861176995840

    3. Most of those numbers are in the column, which focuses on a) the risk of the Delta variant to children under 12 and b) the 29% of Canadians who are not fully vaccinated. Brace yourself for more COVID-19 nastiness https://theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-brace-yourself-for-more-covid-19-nastiness/…Quote Tweet
    1. 2021-08-06

    2. Emerging signs COVID-19 vaccines may not stop Delta variant transmission, England says—The Globe and Mail. (n.d.). Retrieved August 12, 2021, from https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-emerging-signs-covid-19-vaccines-may-not-stop-delta-variant-england/?utm_medium=Referrer:+Social+Network+/+Media&utm_campaign=Shared+Web+Article+Links

    3. There are early signs that people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19 may be able to transmit the Delta variant of the virus as easily as those who have not, scientists at Public Health England (PHE) said on Friday.
    4. Emerging signs COVID-19 vaccines may not stop Delta variant transmission, England says
    1. 2021-08-11

    2. Gov. Ron DeSantis’ Office: State Education Board Could Withhold Salaries Of Superintendents, School Board Members Who Implement Mask Mandates – CBS Miami. (n.d.). Retrieved August 12, 2021, from https://miami.cbslocal.com/2021/08/11/ron-desantis-state-education-board-withhold-salaries-superintendents-school-board-members-mask-mandates/

    3. TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami) – The Office of Gov. Ron DeSantis announced that the Florida Board of Education could withhold the salaries of superintendents and school board members who defy the governor’s executive order prohibiting mask mandates.
    4. Gov. Ron DeSantis’ Office: State Education Board Could Withhold Salaries Of Superintendents, School Board Members Who Implement Mask Mandates
    1. 2021-08-10

    2. Price, A. (2021). Commentary: My pandemic grief and the Japanese art of kintsugi. BMJ, n1906. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n1906

    3. 10.1136/bmj.n1906
    4. Grief is an opportunity to offer empathy by honouring brokenness to support healing, writes Amy PriceAfter the loss of my husband to covid-19, I kept working and tried not to think about it, confident that grief was part of life and time would heal.1 After all, I signed on for the marriage knowing one of us would die first. Even though our last words were, “I love you,” my grieving did not go as planned. I find I am not alone.2Grief’s pain is raw, chronic, unremitting, and cumulative, and we become isolated. Negative thoughts are etched below consciousness. There is no respite from the things we can’t unsee. Without joy, we identify as the problem instead of the problem solver. In pain we can react in anger, freeze in confusion, or retreat, paralysed by fear. Collaborations become laboured, motivation is lost, and inspiration dies.3 Our power to transform hurt is limited, and when the pain spills out, we can harm others.4 The self-disintegration and guilt are exhausting.The ravages and side effects of grief cause survivors to retreat, unable to seek help when it is needed most. Prescribed drugs fall short of expectations because when their effects wear off, the pain, defensive behaviour, and realisation of the finality of death remain.5 The journey back to feeling like a healthy member of society is challenging.
    5. Commentary: My pandemic grief and the Japanese art of kintsugi
    1. 2021-08-09

    2. Kadambari, S., & Vanderslott, S. (2021). Lessons about COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among minority ethnic people in the UK. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, S1473309921004047. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(21)00404-7

    3. 10.1016/S1473-3099(21)00404-7
    4. According to data collected by Public Health England, in the UK, minority ethnic groups were between two and four times more likely to die due to COVID-19 compared with those from a White ethnic background.1Public Health EnglandDisparities in the risk and outcomes of COVID-19. Public Health England, London2021Google Scholar These outcomes are independent of age, sex, or socioeconomic factors. Moreover, at the start of the national vaccine rollout, routinely collected clinical data in England showed that Black people older than 80 years were only half as likely as White people to have been vaccinated against COVID-19.2MacKenna B Curtis HJ Morton CE et al.Trends, regional variation, and clinical characteristics of COVID-19 vaccine recipients: a retrospective cohort study in 23·4 million patients using OpenSAFELY.medRxiv. 2021; (published online Jan 26.) (preprint).https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.01.25.21250356Google Scholar A UK-wide survey of 12 035 participants investigating attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination showed that Black and Black British respondents had the highest rate of vaccine hesitancy (71·8%), followed by Pakistani and Bangladeshi respondents (42·3%), compared with White British or Irish respondents (15·2%) who were not likely or very unlikely to take a vaccine.3Robertson E Reeve KS Niedzwiedz CL et al.Predictors of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the UK household longitudinal study.Brain Behav Immun. 2021; 94: 41-50Crossref PubMed Scopus (20) Google ScholarSince the start of the COVID-19 vaccine programme, we, as health researchers, have sought to engage with over 200 community organisations that provide religious or social support for minority ethnic groups to offer information about available vaccines, answer questions, and encourage dialogue. We met with groups on online meeting platforms during the third national lockdown to answer questions and discuss concerns. The reasons for vaccine hesitancy are complex, multifactorial, and vary according to age, sex, and ethnic group. However, two broad themes were apparent.
    5. Lessons about COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among minority ethnic people in the UK