12 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
  2. Jan 2018
    1. I am the vision. There are no limits to painting; that's why I am involved i

      She does take it to another level and her projects are extraordinary on a larger scale.

    2. It feels like being on another planet and I want to explore immediat

      While this comes from the interviewer, it pulls in what we were talking about in class with Grosse's paintings seeming to immerse viewers into the world of the painting. Which traditional paintings could only accomplish on a 2D/imaginative level.

  3. May 2017
    1. Responses to Ed Folsom's "Database as Genre: The Epic Transformation of Archives

      So an interesting thing about this article is that i's part of a set of articles, all responding to the same essay by Ed Folsom about the Whitman Archive. Jerome McGann (big name in digital humanities) slammed it, saying he didn't understand what a database was. Meredith McGill criticizes a number of things he claims his archive can do. Hayles is actually pretty friendly to Folsom, and in his response, he mentions he wants to make use of her "natural symbionts" phrasing.

  4. Apr 2017
    1. Heisactuallylookingforanaudienceandforconstraints;evenwhenhefindsanaudience,hedoesnotknowthatitisagen-uinelyrhetoricalaudience

      I've been thinking about the internet arguments, mentioned in class, where neither side seems interested in persuasion, and instead just sort of perform their side's argument. On the Internet, audiences are vague, shadowy things (I'm fond of the forum term of the "lurker," someone who reads the forums but doesn't post, and might not even have an account) that come across these arguments through retweets and crosslinks from friends-of-friends. These audiences are the actual target of these arguments, either to rally the base or to persuade moderates to take a more extreme side because they break the situation down into a binary between the one side and the enemy. Every content aggregator article that contains the word "eviscerates" demonstrates that this is a popular form of argument, but does it actually have a situation? Or is its audience entirely fictional?

  5. Feb 2017
    1. Don't take too much for granted. Don't think because these arc women of general intelli· gencc and Christian experience they arc also clear in 1heir respective minds as to the history. mystery, and melhods of the W.C.T.U.

      This is universally good advice for political movements. Looking into past movements and what to appropriate for contemporary use, you see a lot of focus on discipline, like here, and a reality that you have to train your members in the precise message, even if they're generally, even enthusiastically, on your side.

    1. led audi· ences to doubt that he had ever been a slave, or, contrariwise, to doubt that he spoke his own words

      How appropriate after we had a class on conspiracy theories.

      Those of you who've never checked out archconservative internet communities like Free Republic or The Blaze haven't seen the staggering litany of accusations against former President Obama's oratory. Ranging from teleprompter/empty suit accusations to accusing him of near-supernatural trickery or hypnotism to explain his popularity.

    1. successful communication is that which requires the least expenditure of mental energy to achieve successful receptio

      A thing for us to look forward to for next week, but I am unironically hype to learn more about this idea. There's all sorts of resonances this is already setting off with me--I'm thinking in terms of credit scores, twitter follower counts, and other mathematical means to codify the level of influence/respectability, it seems like there are some interesting connections down that way.

    2. as well as advocating for the rights of free African Americans and of Native Americans, for temperance, and for women's rights, including suffrage

      What's interesting to me is the general intersection of the lot. The National Parks Service has a chart that shows a general outline of three movements and how leadership worked across them. It's worth taking a moment to look at, especially with the first line in this paragraph and the contemporary reality that many liberal and leftist groups today tend to trip up with intersectionality.

    1. All passions arc not alike capable of producing this effect.

      Interesting division. You get a number of contemporary articles contrasting hope and fear in political appeals, also using a similar "elevating/lowering" rationale. But fear I see usually linked with anger, even though it's one of Campbell's "vehement" appeals.

  6. May 2016
  7. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. she could not write sonnets, she brought herself to read them; and though there seemed no chance of her throwing a whole party into raptures by a prelude on the pianoforte, of her own composition, she could listen to other people’s performance with very little fatigue. Her greatest deficiency was in the pencil — she had no notion of drawing

      This description of Catherine sounds similar to the description given in Pride and Prejudice of Elizabeth Bennett, who also has no great talent on the pianoforte or with a pencil. Austen consistently portrays the heroines of her novels in contrast to the women in the novels famous during her own life. These characteristics as mentioned in the Broadview edition of "Northanger Abbey" in appendix C.3 included musical accomplishments, artistic skills, and care for small creatures.

  8. May 2015