45 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. prolonged interaction between the instructor and the students

      I'm always a little proud when I say that Hypothesis will not make things easier/more efficient for teachers. If anything, it helps widen and deepen this "prolonged interaction between the instructor and students," which takes even more time!

  2. Jan 2019
    1. But these tools require we think about their purpose, method, and audience just as carefully as when we design an essay prompt, a problem set, or any other assessment exercise.

      This is an example of when meta-teaching is helpful.

  3. Oct 2018
  4. Sep 2018
  5. Oct 2017
    1. Move away from simply asking whether EdTech is helpful or unhelpful.It’s here to stay, so focus on what pedagogical strategies it can support and how to use it better to improve student learning and other outcomes.

      Refreshing!

    1. Vendors serve as an invaluable source of knowledge on edtech products and trends for higher education decision-makers, cited as an information source in 80 percent of our interviews. That ranks second only to learning by word-of-mouth from colleagues (96 percent)

      These are pretty opposite sources of knowledge, one bottom up, the other top down.

    2. quality of partner relationships.

      Meaning the "service"? Nothing in here about privacy policies, terms of service, etc.

    3. rather than develop their own tools.

      Why not? Is it not scaleable? sustainable?

  6. Mar 2017
    1. It is our failure to internalize the idea that people who work for edtech companies are our colleagues and our partners which is at the root of much of disconnect that I see across the school / vendor divide.

      I came to this article through an Audrey Watters Tweet critique, but actually think this is a reasonable argument. It does not necessarily mean turning off the critical lens when evalutating ed-tech. It does mean turning criticism into conversation.

    2. This is not to say that those of us in higher ed are immune from market forces,

      Right?! Or neo-liberalism.

    3. We should not conflate the logic of short-term profit maximization with the values of the people who go to work at for-profit edtech companies.

      Though it is all connected and those connections need to be interogated by academics and by those who choose to work in industry.

    1. authentic relationships between the the people who work at your company and your customers.  
    2. Your customer-retention strategy should be as robust and intense as your customer-acquisition strategy.
    3. higher ed, as a whole, is a largely relationship-based industry.
    4. The best way to scale your platform, service or product is to get a few schools to sign up, and then spend lots of energy and money making sure the followers know. This means having a sales strategy that is narrow, deep and focused.  

      '#influencers'

    5. That's why very few of us are likely to sign up with an unproven vendor or adopt a new platform or service unless our peers have already done so.

      This similarly assumes things are moving one-way and is not truly in the spirit of collaboration/conversation.

    6. it requires robust and sustained conversations. 

      Yes.

    7. they talk about their solutions rather than our challenges.  
  7. Jun 2016
    1. Should faculty (and even students) have a greater say in which tools the university chooses instead of constantly finding themselves as consumers of those forced upon them by the institution?

      The answer here is clearly yes. But what forums exist or might be imagined to enable this dialogue. I know at h we are lucky (if I might say so myself) to have an educator on staff and we work closely with faculty on our product. What more could we do though? And how could an indie ed tech community more broadly nurture these conversations?...

    1. In considering considerations, I think it’s important to begin with a thinking (or erasing?) exercise that asks you to forget everything you know or think you know about ed tech and start over.  
  8. May 2016
    1. “curriculets,” the company’s eponymous term for embedded quizzes, videos and other multimedia elements designed to offer students a richer reading experience and to give teachers data into how their pupils were progressing.

      As a teacher, I don't know that I want this prefabricated, though....

    2. articles and take quizzes,

      And annotate, I believe.

  9. Apr 2016
    1. urchasing often involves department heads, CIOs, and provosts, since the choices made can affect the entire school.
    2. To succeed, they will need to fundamentally rethink their value propositions to take full advantage of the digital medium and consider the entire educational experience.

      And specifically the utility of various tools shipped with content.

    3. customization tools to “build your own textbook” from a variety of preexisting and newly created content

      Seems like a great fit for h...

    4. texts embedded in the online course
    5. practical tools that supplement core instruction

      Like, for example, hypothes.is?

  10. Mar 2016
    1. if someone is willing to commit to talking through hip hop

      I got this...

    2. like the personal API

      I need to learn more about this movement...

    1. They are tools like SPLOT, Wikity, Reclaim Hosting, Known, Github, and Hypothes.is to name a few.

      Word!

    1. At least on dating apps everyone can agree that everyone on the app has the same desired goal: a relationship.

      Interesting distinction. So we don't have the same goals in the algorithm of, say, an adaptive learning program?...

    1. You can listen to the “I Love My Label” playlist on Spotify, but you should support artists by buying their music. Unless it's Metallica. Then share freely.

      Badass.

    2. counterintuitively perhaps less “personalized.”

      But isn't the point that is is more (or more actually) "personalized"?

    3. “Personalization” might sound like it’s designed especially for us; but “personalization” is an algorithm based on a profile, on a category, on a label.

      This is a powerful argument. But could a proliferation of labels, enabled by computational power, better approach personalization?

      I've been thinking about a similar idea in relation to the music industry/algorithm while reading the above: are Spotify/Netflix recommendations looking for the hit? Or are they looking for musical/filmic suggestions that will keep me individually as a customer? I'm much more compelled by that model than what's offered on top 40 radio or the megaplex.

    4. Algorithms and analytics will “personalize” our world, we’re told. The problem, of course, is that the algorithms and the analytics also make everything sound the same.

      I'd love to just accept this argument, but want there to be more evidence. No doubt there are more radical forms of self-education, but isn't it true to some degree that there is personalization in, say, adaptive learning programs?

    5. What happens in the face of an algorithmic education to intellectual curiosity?

      Fair enough, but is it either/or or both/and. I'm happy to be recommended a new band by Spotify, but ultimately will make the call if I like it or not, perhaps even clicking a reaction so that the algorithm gets better? Or is that a fantasy?...I'm also not going to be deaf to my friends recommendations, etc. that might also direct my musical curiosity.

    6. I call myself a “serial dropout,”

    7. Little by little the subversive features of the computer were eroded away: Instead of cutting across and so challenging the very idea of subject boundaries, the computer now defined a new subject; instead of changing the emphasis from impersonal curriculum to excited live exploration by students, the computer was now used to reinforce School’s ways. What had started as a subversive instrument of change was neutralized by the system and converted into an instrument of consolidation.

      Wow, This is a great quote, and so apt in this new context of the rise of the LMS.

    8. Once something sells, than we hear it and echoes of it again and again and again and again.

      Love this sequence of slides:

    9. No one – well, except my parents, I guess – knew how many times I played that 45 of Autograph’s “Turn Up the Radio,” how many times I rewound the cassette to replay Guns & Roses’ “Welcome to the Jungle.” But now the software knows

      This seems empowering to me (or potentially so)...

    10. predict hit songs

      Different from predicting what songs I might like.

  11. Dec 2015
    1. ed-tech as data-extraction, control, surveillance, privatization, and profiteering