33 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
    1. And no child in highschool regardless should be able to do that either because of dresscode, horny hormone infused teenage boys, and you never know if some of the teacher are attracted to children.

      The writer of this argument does not use a specific type of evidence (first-hand, second-hand, and quantitative). The writer does not use facts proven by trustworthy authority, personal experience that would be reasoning for the writers opinion, or data that can be measured, but rather simply stating their opinion as evidence.

    2. gives kids the idea they can dress that way inside of school

      Chloe Neslon Logical Fallacies: Begging the Question - This claim is based on evidence that seems questionable and it is given without a source, making the claim seem untrustworthy.

    3. I find it disgusting

      Chloe Nelson: Logical Fallacy: False Authority - This writer states their personal opinion, and in the next sentence uses their opinion almost as evidence or a fact to claim that high schoolers in sports bras is "borderline child pornography," when in reality, the only thing back them up is their own authority.

    4. horny hormone infused teenage boys, and you never know if some of the teacher are attracted to children.

      The speaker uses the slippy slope fallacy in their argument. While it is possible for teenagers (namely boys according to the speaker) to sexualize minors in only sports bras and no shirt, it's an extreme case to assume all teenage boys would do so. The same applies to teachers sexualizing minors, as it is possible, it's an extreme case to assume all teachers or even any would do so.

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    1. whose mother is Colombian.

      Saying that Maria's mom is Columbian has nothing to do with the next sentence where it talks about singing.

    2. For all of its faults, the original film doesn’t rationalize aggression—or racism—away or reduce its characters to single motives.

      The speaker addresses one of the major problems with the new movie; however, doesn't give much reason to back it up.

    1. Your eyes are very important to your body, why risk damaging them by looking at a screen all day?

      Loaded question This sentence is a loaded question because, the author is asking the audience why they would risk damaging their eyes, by looking at a screen all day and assuming that the audience wants to purposely damage their eyes.

    2. If students were given a tablet for school, they will never pay attention in class.

      slippery slope: this sentence is labeled as a slippery slope because the author is leaping to an extreme hypothetical outcome by assuming that if students are given a tablet then then wont draw their attention to class.

  2. Oct 2021
    1. One example is a program that amounts to a whitelist for VIPs on Facebook, allowing some of the users most likely to spread misinformation to break Facebook’s rules without facing consequences.
  3. May 2021
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
  6. Oct 2020
    1. The false promise of your source code repository is that everything it contains is “good.” To complete your task, just find something that does something similar, copy, modify, and you’re done. Looking inside the same repository seems like a safety mechanism for quality but, in fact, there is no such guarantee.
    1. I’m reminded of how Greenspan’s observers in the financial industry tended to project all manner of genius onto him simply because he refused to articulate, in any concrete way that involved anything so crass as a narrative, what he was thinking or doing. For market watchers and finance industry savants, Greenspan was a human koan upon which they were expected to puzzle out their own economic enlightenment. If you didn’t get it, you were the idiot. 

      The Alan Greenspan fallacy

  7. Sep 2020
  8. Aug 2020
    1. This is all well and good when we’re talking about buying decisions, but what if I were to say, “Should we go to war in April or in May?”

      In addition to avoiding biases, we also have to be aware of logical fallacies too! False equivalence, etc...

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  9. Jul 2020
  10. May 2020
    1. CodeGuard relies upon industry best practices to protect customers’ data. All backups and passwords are encrypted, secure connections (SFTP/SSH/SSL) are utilized if possible, and annual vulnerability testing is conducted by an independent agency. To-date, there has not been a data breach or successful hack or attack upon CodeGuard.
    1. after nearly 10 years of continuous improvement

      Not necessarily a good or favorable thing. It might actually be preferable to pick a younger software product that doesn't have the baggage of previous architectural decisions to slow them down. Newer projects can benefit from both (1) the mistakes of previously-originated projects and (2) the knowledge of what technologies/paradigms are popular today; they may therefore be more agile and better able to create something that fits with the current state of the art, as opposite to the state of the art from 10 years ago (which, as we all know, was much different: before the popularity of GraphQL, React, headless CMS, for example).

      Older projects may have more technical debt and have more legacy technologies/paradigms/integrations/decisions that they now have the burden of supporting.

    1. as well as those of the country your site targets

      This is assuming your site only targets one country!?

      What if you want to target the whole world? Isn't that what most sites would like to target?

  11. Apr 2020
    1. Despite their awarded diplomas in the art of writing, you'd be surprised at how many editors and journalists in the United States make English mistakes. For instance, "an" is still often coupled with words that begin with an "H" sound, even though this is improper. I'd advise against treating material from news sources as if it were error-free or even a higher authority on grammar.
    1. the security risk argument doesn't make sense. Numerous social media and forum sites support HTML and they don't seem particularly prone to security issues.
  12. Mar 2020
    1. many of our interaction paradigms literally involved putting the old process on a screen
    2. we have anxious salarymen asking about the theft of their jobs, in the same way that’s apparently done by immigrants
    3. gave rise to human-powered flying machines, as though all creatures are made of essentially the same organic mechanics
  13. Dec 2019
    1. There’s the command prompt version, which is extremely useful for anyone who is constantly in the command prompt. But don’t panic if you’re not a command line fan, because it’s not the only tool available to you—there are great todo.txt clients for every platform.

      Just because you don't like one client doesn't mean you should rule out all clients of text-based to-do lists from consideration. (Similar issue with hledger: there are GUIs available for plain-text accounting software too!)

      Just because there are tools/features for power users doesn't mean it can't also work for more casual users.

  14. Nov 2019
  15. May 2019
  16. Apr 2018
    1. Interesting parts on the more manipulative aspects of persuasion. They are not necessarily evil, or fallacious.

      Parts look a lot like a this 2007 article : https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.copyblogger.com/persuasive-writing/

  17. Feb 2014
    1. A CAUTIONARY NOTE Don’t brief the case until you have read it through at least once. Don’t think that because you have found the judge’s best purple prose you have necessarily extracted the essence of the decision. Look for unarticulated premises, logical fallacies, manipulation of the factual record, or distortions of precedent. Then ask, How does this case relate to other cases in the same general area of law? What does it show about judicial policymaking? Does the result violate your sense of justice or fairness? How might it have been better decided?

      Read the case to identify:

      • unarticulated premises
      • logical fallacies
      • manipulation of the factual record
      • distortions of precedent.

      Then ask:

      • How does this case relate to other cases in the same general area of law?

      • What does it show about judicial policymaking?

      • Does the result violate your sense of justice or fairness?

      • How might it have been better decided?