23 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
  2. Dec 2021
    1. violencia de género

      «Todo acto de violencia sexista que tiene como resultado posible o real un daño físico, sexual o psíquico, incluidas las amenazas, la coerción o la privación arbitraria de libertad, ya sea que ocurra en la vida pública o en la privada».

    2. Esa “formación” del hombre, que lo conduce a una estructura de la personalidad de tipo psicopático

      No existe un perfil único de maltratador. Tampoco se trata de hombres agresivos ni de psicópatas. Nuestro estudio pone en cuestión los estereotipos relacionados hasta ahora con la conducta y los rasgos del maltratador, como puede ser el consumo de sustancias tóxicas y de alcohol, la vivencia de experiencias traumáticas en la edad infantil o los problemas psíquicos. En este último aspecto, los datos del patrón de personalidad de un grupo de maltratadores basados en el inventario clínico multiaxial Millon-II señalan a la compulsividad como rasgo más destacado de estas personas; no obstante, el percentil no supera el grado de normalidad, por lo que se descarta la posibilidad de una psicopatología.

  3. Nov 2021
    1. const palette: { [key: string]: string } = {...
    2. Object literals don't have index signatures. They are assignable to types with index signatures if they have compatible properties and are fresh (i.e. provably do not have properties we don't know about) but never have index signatures implicitly or explicitly.
    3. Which... is confusing because Palette technically does have an index signature Palette is a mapped type, and mapped types don't have index signatures. The fact that both use [ ] is a syntactic coincidence.
    4. Generate type with the index signature: interface RandomMappingWithIndexSignature { stringProp: string; numberProp: number; [propName: string]: string | number | undefined; }
    5. we have no way to know that the line nameMap[3] = "bob"; isn't somewhere in your program
    1. The other commenters are right about the potential solutions. However, it is actually considered a best practice to move the object with the index signature to a nested property.Said differently: No property in the object with the index signature should depart from how the index signature is typed.
    2. Like others have noted, your function does not conform to index signature. [key: string]: string means "all fields are strings" and on the next line you declare a field with function in it.This can be solved by using union types:type IFoo = { [foo: string]: string } & { fooMethod(fooParam: string): void }
    1. So now the question is, why does Session, an interface, not get implicit index signatures while SessionType, an identically-structured typealias, *does*? Surely, you might again think, the compiler does not simply deny implicit index signatures tointerface` types? Surprisingly enough, this is exactly what happens. See microsoft/TypeScript#15300, specifically this comment: Just to fill people in, this behavior is currently by design. Because interfaces can be augmented by additional declarations but type aliases can't, it's "safer" (heavy quotes on that one) to infer an implicit index signature for type aliases than for interfaces. But we'll consider doing it for interfaces as well if that seems to make sense And there you go. You cannot use a Session in place of a WithAdditionalParams<Session> because it's possible that someone might merge properties that conflict with the index signature at some later date. Whether or not that is a compelling reason is up for rather vigorous debate, as you can see if you read through microsoft/TypeScript#15300.
    2. why is Session not assignable to WithAdditionalParams<Session>? Well, the type WithAdditionalParams<Session> is a subtype of Session with includes a string index signature whose properties are of type unknown. (This is what Record<string, unknown> means.) Since Session does not have an index signature, the compiler does not consider WithAdditionalParams<Session> assignable to Session.
  4. Oct 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. A ring signature is created when the sender of a transaction is mixed together with a random collection of other IDs that basically serve as a decoy. This process produces a unique digital signature for the transaction, but it blurs the identity of the real sender.

      Ring Signature

  6. Jul 2020
    1. prevent its disclosure to any person not authorized to create the subscriber's digital signature

      So the signature can be used by another entity to create the digital signature if authorized beforehand.

      So if there is a statement that "I authorize [organization] to create a cryptographic key-pair on my behalf, and create the digital signature."

  7. May 2020
  8. Feb 2020
  9. Aug 2019
  10. May 2017
    1. A cognitive signature™ encodes the exact structure of a graph.●It is a lossless encoding, similar to a Gödel numbering. *●For unlabeled graphs, integers are sufficient for a cognitive signature.●For example, 0 maps to and from an empty graph with no nodes or arcs.●1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 can be mapped to and from the following graphs:●To encode the structure of conceptual graphs in Cognitive Memory, the cognitive signatures are based on generalized combinatorial maps. **By contrast, a word vector encodes labels, but not structure.●A word vector is a “bag of labels” that ignores the graph connections.●Word vectors are often used for measuring the similarity of documents.●But they discard the structural information necessary for reasoning, question answering, and language understanding.

      Comparing Kyndi's Cognitive Signature to word vectors. Word vectors as bags of labels whereas a cognitive signature captures structure as well as ontology

  11. Oct 2016
  12. Aug 2015
    1. Digital signature

      see Burdens of Proof for a technological history of digital signatures.