10 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2020
    1. my Mind

      http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/90

      • That item is simply a portrait of John Locke. The relation is that the word "mind" is very relevant to all the work accomplished by Locke, as he spent most of his life as a renowned philosopher.

      Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    2. I was most inexpressibly sick in Body

      http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/526

      • This item is an excerpt from Oroonoko in which Aphra Behn is describing his physique. What is extremely ironic is that in that excerpt he is being described as almost god like, but he ends up suffering from illness, similar in fashion to what Crusoe is depicting here.

      Behn, Aphra, and Adelaide P. Amore. Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave: a Critical Edition. University Press of America, 1987. Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    3. Robinson Crusoe

      http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/332

      • This item relates to the artifact in that it is a map illustrating towns and villages described throughout the rest of the book.

      Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    4. The Ship

      http://enlightenmens.lmc.gatech.edu/items/show/129

      • This word reminded me of the part of Oroonoko in which he is held captive on a ship and then sold into slavery.

      Behn, Aphra, and Adelaide P. Amore. Oroonoko, or, The Royal Slave: a Critical Edition. University Press of America, 1987.

    5. and the Breach of my Duty to God and my Father.

      Here, Crusoe parallels “God” and his “Father”. This hints at him holding them up to similar pedestals.This peculiar way of comparing them is also evidently seen in the bible, where Jesus- being crucified- exclaims out to his Father (who is also “god”) “Father, into thy hands I commit my spirit.” In another passage he similarly shouts”My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?”, while being crucified. Here, Jesus uses both “God” and “Father” interchangeably. This parallel between crusoe and Jesus demonstrates how Crusoe’s character is mirroring Jesus. This shows us how, although an early novel, the narrative still contains similar plots and characters to traditional pre-novel pieces of literature- in this case being the bible.

      “BibleGateway.” Mark 4:35-41 NIV - - Bible Gateway, www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Mark+4:35-41&version=NIV. “BibleGateway.” Luke 23:46 NIV - - Bible Gateway, www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke+23:46&version=NIV. Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    6. came now fresh into my Mind, and my Conscience,

      The words conscience and mind bring about ideas that can be noted in John Locke’s text: *An essay concerning Human Understanding.* In book two, Locke explains how thoughts come to be. He believes that “All ideas come from sensation or reflections”. In this specific case, the ideas being expressed in this excerpt are rooted in reflection, as Crusoe is thinking on how and why he dared to actually leave his parents the way that he did. Much of this is seen throughout the whole narrative as it is written in the view of Crusoe. Nonetheless, it demonstrates how this story is evolving from simple story telling in the perspective of an outsider to the actual recount of the person living it in their own words.

      John Locke, The Works of John Locke in Nine Volumes, (London: Rivington, 1824 12th ed.). Vol. 1. 2/12/2020. https://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/761 Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    7. Entreaties

      An unfamiliar word, I searched the definition to better understand the excerpt. One definition according to the OED: An earnest or humble request. Also: the action of making such a request; supplication. Here he uses a word with a very innocent connotation to describe what his mother has asked of him. In most traditional texts, prior to the novel, women always seemed to be portrayed as innocent and truthful. His mother is being portrayed here in that exact manner. As a result, this further enhances the idea that this text still contains elements of traditional pre novel texts.

      "entreaty, n." OED Online, Oxford University Press, December 2019, www.oed.com/view/Entry/62972. Accessed 12 February 2020.

      Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    8. how justly I was overtaken by the Judgment of Heaven for my wicked leaving my Father's House, and abandoning my Duty; all the good Counsel of my Parents,

      This reminds me of the story in the bible of the prodigal son. In this story, a young man leaves his family and completely wastes his inheritance. Ultimately, he returns home and his father accepts him with open arms, throwing him a huge welcome back party. Saying ”For this son of mine was dead and is alive again; he was lost and is found.”. When crusoe says he feels guilty for having left his “duty” to God and his father, it almost sounds exactly like the prodigal son apologizing to his father upon returning home:‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son”. This illustrates how Robinson crusoe indeed mirrors the bible, which considered a traditional text, although it is still considered one of the earliest novels.

      Luke 15 NIV, biblehub.com/niv/luke/15.htm. Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

    9. I began now seriously to reflect upon what I had done

      This seems like a huge contrast to the story of Fantomina, where she seemingly never reflects upon why she is pursuing sir Beauplaisir and feels no shame in constantly scamming him. This can be noted in the story where she immediately leaves the place she's staying at when she hears Beauplaisir leaves “and in that Time provided herself of another Disguise to carry on a third Plot”. Here Fantomina doesn't give her plan of scamming him a second thought, and displays absolutely no remorse. The juxtaposition of both of these characters and their stories demonstrate how distinct these stories truly are. In Fantomina, we see a very different type of story, completely apart from stories that existed at that time. Robinson crusoe seems to have more of a traditional story vibe, having aspects that reflect the bible. Robinson Crusoe demonstrates how some early novels still maintained traits from traditional literatures and Fantomina demonstrates the beginning of distinct genres and perspectives coming into play within the narrative.

      Haywood, Eliza. “Fantomina.” Fantomina: Or, Love in a Maze., digital.library.upenn.edu/women/haywood/fantomina/fantomina.html. Mowat, Diane, and Daniel Defoe. Robinson Crusoe. Oxford University Press Canada, 2008.

  2. Jun 2019
    1. Daniel Defoe

      Daniel Defoe - English novelist, pamphleteer and journalist Daniel Defoe is best known for his novels Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders