17 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. ou cry together at enough funerals, you figure you can bleedtogether on a football field, too.

      I found this so powerful and the fact that the author included it twice truly makes an impact on this article. It wasn't your typical sad soppy story. It was showing how family comes to together during hard times and they patch up their bruise ( losing teammates/co-workers) with a band-aid (football).

  2. Jun 2018
    1. In hindsight, I read these acts as cries for help, a kind of academic self-medication. I was bored, not because I’d mastered the required material – I got more than my share of non-A grades – but because the things I was asked to do were generally uninspiring. Perhaps nothing was more uninspiring than preparing for an AP exam.
  3. Feb 2018
    1. As they enter adolescence, silence and modesty are instilled as desirable values, as girls are pressed to behave in a "modest fashion."

      Girls are often times sheltered by their parents. They have stricter rules, earlier curfews and many other restrictions that are not placed on boys.

    1. 133,000 people behind bars in U.S. prisons and jails for drug possession – and 63,000 of these people are held pre-trial, which means they’re locked up simply because they’re too poor to post bail.

      Why are we doing this to our citizens, we are supposed to be helping them while all we are doing is mentally and physically hurting them more then the drugs do.

    2. 80 percent of those arrests are for simple drug possession.
    3. More than a million people are arrested each year in the U.S. for drug possession,
    4. Decriminalization benefits public safety and health.
    5. Our retrograde federal administration is ramping up the war on drugs – despite widespread public support for ending it and instead focusing our limited resources on health-based approaches to drug addiction and overdose deaths.

      why is the government fighting for what they believe is right and not what is best for their citizens, since their citizens have experimented with drugs.

    6. Half of all adults in the U.S. have used an illegal drug at some point.
  4. Dec 2017
    1. The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act

      The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (ISDEAA) was passed in 1975 by the Congress of the United States and increased the amount of self-governance of the native peoples1. If any Native American tribe requests a “self-determination” contract from the federal government, the government is obligated to give them one. This contract gives the tribe funding for programs and gives it the responsibility of running services administered by the federal government. The federal government is also required to provide “contract support costs” – the additional transaction costs of the Act. These costs are only enacted when the tribe decides to plan its own programs without the government’s help. The Act gives the native peoples a lot of freedom and leeway, as they are able to create something they can call their own through these government-provided funds. Funding for the ISDEAA comes from the Indian Self-Determination Fund, which has its limitations: the Availability Clause and the Reduction Clause. The Availability Clause provides that funds are subject to availability of appropriations, and the Reduction Clause states that funding to one tribe cannot be reduced to gain more funding for another2.         This Act has been one of the most important legislative acts for Indians because it greatly affects them in a positive way. The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act “…has been a key driver in improving communities throughout Indian country”3. One example of this would be the lives of the Navajos in Arizona. The Director of the Rough Rock Demonstration School told the Inquiry that under this new legislation they have established their own school system. The director describes the benefits of this, “Navaho people…are running a sophisticated school, unabashedly oriented to Navaho children”1. All of the staff comes from the community – giving the Navajos more jobs and income. The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act not only improves the education of Native Americans, but their quality of life as well. This principle of native self-determination in education was already accepted in Canada in 1972. The National Indian Brotherhood wrote a policy paper called the Indian Control of Indian Education, which was accepted the following year1. The acceptance of native people’s self-governance was clearly growing in the 1970s. Because of the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, Native Americans were and are able to control more aspects of their lives, especially education.

      A Navajo woman, Kathryn Manuelito, conducted research to emphasize the importance of education to the Indians. After studying the Navajo peoples she stated that “Since the passage of the Indian Self-Determination Act, which provides for tribal- and community based schools, many Indian peoples have considered formal education to be a primary force in the survival of their languages and cultures"4. The indigenous also believe that the act preserves their rights. Manuelito concluded that the traditional Navajo education that resulted from the Act has advanced and helped the Navajo to maintain their existing identities. By the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, Indian cultures, especially the Navajo, were able to be preserved4.

      Picture: http://data2.archives.ca/ap/a/a185534-v8.jpg Caption: Reverend Lachlan McLean counsels student soldier at Indian Residential School in the 1970s.

      Citations:

      1. Thomas Berger, “Native Claims,” in Northern Frontier Northern Homeland: The Report of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry. (Vancouver: Douglas & McIntyre, 1988), 183.
      2. Elizabeth M. Glazer, “Comments – Appropriating Availability: Reconciling Purpose and Text Under the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act,” The University of Chicago Law Review 71, no. 4 (2004):1637-1638.
      3. United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Indian Affairs (1993), Amending the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act to Provide Further Self-Governance by Indian Tribes, and for Other Purposes: Report (to Accompany S. 979). (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 2015), 1-2.
      4. Kathryn Manuelito, “The Role of education in American Indian Self-Determination: Lessons from the Ramah Navajo Community School,” Anthropology & Education Quarterly 36, no. 1 (2005): 73-75. http://doi:10.1525/aeq.2005.36.1.073.
  5. Mar 2016
    1. As professionals continue to argue the academic validity of hip hop and disseminate the social significance of rap,

      Hip hop is an art and I will fight any man woman or child who says otherwise

  6. Feb 2016
    1. A minimum wage of $7.25 is not enough to live on. Full-time minimum-wage workers today earn about $15,000 a year. In 1968, they earned about $20,000 per year in today’s dollars. While certainly not enough for a life of luxury, it is enough for a family of three to stay above the poverty line – which can’t be said for today’s minimum-wage workers.

      This is true, $7.25 is not enough for people to live on. At first this was understandable because this was an ok amount for teenagers to experience their first job, but with unemployment rates high, people are forced to deal with minimum wage to make a living. This is not enough for them

    2. If we’re going to live in one unified America, we need an economy that works for all Americans

      I agree that if we are to be unified as a society, we need an economy that works to everyone's benefit.

    1. Developing the two Wyoming sites would make more than 640 million tons of coal available to mining companies, according to the Interior Department. Each ton of burned coal creates 1.66 metric tons of carbon dioxide, according to government data.

      This is an astounding statistic that would be hard for anyone to back up. It is issues like this that we need to address in order to stop the huge problem of climate change.

    1. But after decades of expanding enrollments, applications have begun tapering off. College enrollment peaked in 2011.

      This is the point i was trying to get across in my argument. College tuition is getting to the point where students are considering not going to school instead. This is a serious problem that should be addressed.

  7. Jun 2015