4 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. const setRefs = useRef(new Map()).current; const { children } = props; return ( <div> {React.Children.map(children, child => { return React.cloneElement(child, { // v not innerRef ref: node => { console.log('imHere'); return !node ? setRefs.delete(child.key) : setRefs.set(child.key, node)

      Illustrates the importance of having unique keys when iterating over children, since that allows them to be used as unique keys in a Map.

    1. Each time the ID changes, the EmailInput will be recreated and its state will be reset to the latest defaultEmail value. (Click here to see a demo of this pattern.) With this approach, you don’t have to add key to every input. It might make more sense to put a key on the whole form instead. Every time the key changes, all components within the form will be recreated with a freshly initialized state. In most cases, this is the best way to handle state that needs to be reset.
  2. Oct 2019
    1. However, if more control is needed, you can pass any of these pieces of state as a prop (as indicated above) and that state becomes controlled. As soon as this.props[statePropKey] !== undefined, internally, downshift will determine its state based on your prop's value rather than its own internal state.
    2. refKey: if you're rendering a composite component, that component will need to accept a prop which it forwards to the root DOM element. Commonly, folks call this innerRef. So you'd call: getRootProps({refKey: 'innerRef'}) and your composite component would forward like: <div ref={props.innerRef} />