2 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2017
    1. ANTONY. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones: So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault; And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,— For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honorable men,— Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once,—not without cause: What cause withholds you, then, to mourn for him?— O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason!—Bear with me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me.

      In this scene, Shakespeare balances the perspectives of two major characters, Brutus and Antony, and through them, the general population’s divided opinions on the assassination. In Brutus’ eulogy of Julius Caesar, his tone and manner of speech highlights his respect of Caesar, yet he laments for Caesar’s ‘ambition’, which was Brutus’ justification for conspiring against Caesar. Brutus also naively allows Antony to give a eulogy of Caesar, on the clause that he would not accuse the conspirators of any wrongdoings, in assumption that it would further the conspirators’ standing and claims. Antony does give a speech that is deferential and full of praise, yet his use of repetition, mockery, use of pathos, and sarcasm degrades the standing of Brutus and his fellow conspirators, expelling the crowd’s previous positive sentiment of the conspirators into, whipping them into an emotional frenzy against the conspirators.

      Mark Antony repeatedly asks rhetorical questions to the audience that contradict with Brutus’ claims of Caesar’s ever-dominating ‘ambition’ and ‘greed’, and deliberately ends each question by re-affirming that “Brutus is an honourable man”. His repeated use of rhetorical questions before stressing Brutus’ honour, who’s speech contradicted with Antony’s claims, forges a derisive and sarcastic tone to his praise of Brutus, undercutting and undermining Brutus’ standing with the plebeians, resulting in him fleeing from the city even before Antony finished his oration. This scene establishes Antony as a scheming and well-versed orator, who is bent on avenging Caesar as a front for advancing his own position in Roman society.

  2. Sep 2013
    1. eulogy

      I really like the use of "Eulogy" here. This is a word that has a lot of connotation. Obviously, it is something that happens after one's death, but it also is from someone who knows the deceased well. It's also something look highly upon, like being on a soapbox or in the spot-light.