14 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. by Charlotte with the calmness of amused curiosity, and by Mr. Parker with the eager eye which hoped to see scarcely any empty houses

      The contrast between Charlotte’s and Mr. Parker’s attitudes towards these houses are somewhat farcical for the audience. While Charlotte, upon her first visit, is not associating the houses with any external values, Mr. Parker has come to deem the plain houses a gold mine.

  2. Jul 2018
    1. Josephine got very red when this happened, and she fastened her small, bead-like eyes on the tablecloth as if she saw a minute strange insect creeping through the web of it. But Constantia’s long, pale face lengthened and set, and she gazed away—away—far over the desert, to where that line of camels unwound like a thread of wool...

      The girls advert their attention to something else to restrain from their annoyance at Nurse Andrews, but there is a contrast to the entities they turn to: the table close up right before them versus the faraway, imagined desert, and the tiny insect versus a line of large mammalian camels.

  3. Jun 2017
    1. ANTONY. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones: So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault; And grievously hath Caesar answer’d it. Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest,— For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honorable men,— Come I to speak in Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, faithful and just to me: But Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. He hath brought many captives home to Rome, Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill: Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff: Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown, Which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And, sure, he is an honourable man. I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once,—not without cause: What cause withholds you, then, to mourn for him?— O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason!—Bear with me; My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, And I must pause till it come back to me.

      In this scene, Shakespeare balances the perspectives of two major characters, Brutus and Antony, and through them, the general population’s divided opinions on the assassination. In Brutus’ eulogy of Julius Caesar, his tone and manner of speech highlights his respect of Caesar, yet he laments for Caesar’s ‘ambition’, which was Brutus’ justification for conspiring against Caesar. Brutus also naively allows Antony to give a eulogy of Caesar, on the clause that he would not accuse the conspirators of any wrongdoings, in assumption that it would further the conspirators’ standing and claims. Antony does give a speech that is deferential and full of praise, yet his use of repetition, mockery, use of pathos, and sarcasm degrades the standing of Brutus and his fellow conspirators, expelling the crowd’s previous positive sentiment of the conspirators into, whipping them into an emotional frenzy against the conspirators.

      Mark Antony repeatedly asks rhetorical questions to the audience that contradict with Brutus’ claims of Caesar’s ever-dominating ‘ambition’ and ‘greed’, and deliberately ends each question by re-affirming that “Brutus is an honourable man”. His repeated use of rhetorical questions before stressing Brutus’ honour, who’s speech contradicted with Antony’s claims, forges a derisive and sarcastic tone to his praise of Brutus, undercutting and undermining Brutus’ standing with the plebeians, resulting in him fleeing from the city even before Antony finished his oration. This scene establishes Antony as a scheming and well-versed orator, who is bent on avenging Caesar as a front for advancing his own position in Roman society.

    1. Act I, Scene II

      Shakespeare has employed the upper classes’ fear of Caesar (Namely Flavius and Murellus) and Caesar’s overwhelming support with the plebeians to build up Caesar into a deity; An indestructible and perpetual force. However, in the second scene of the play, this image of Caesar is completely reversed, with all of Caesar’s imperfections placed starkly in the spotlight.

      When Cassius attempts to convince Brutus of the danger that Julius Caesar poses, he juxtaposes the public image of Caesar with the reality. The truth that Cassius tells is of a Caesar that nearly drowned, and cried to Cassius “Help me, Cassius, or I sink!” Though Cassius may be exaggerating or spinning tales in an attempt to convince Brutus to their cause, this scene still sharply contrasts with the figure of Caesar built up so far in the play.

      While Caesar is talking to Antony, he commands him to “Come on my right hand, for this ear is deaf”, indicating that Caesar is deaf in his left ear. Shakespeare goes to extreme lengths to let the audience know of Caesar’s many physical and mental flaws in an attempt to show how even the seemingly most perfect people have their imperfections, and that in the end, everyone is as much of a human as one another, and that no human can ever become a god.

  4. Apr 2017
    1. meaning

      Signifyin' definitely differs from the Enlightenment concerns for uniformity and simplicity. Style and indirectness are virtues.

    2. rhetoric's practical purpose: to win, to persuade.

      This is different than what we have been reading from Corder and others the past few weeks, who have been trying to advocate against rhetoric as a contest and more as a formative experience and something that should come from a place of love.

  5. Feb 2017
    1. Spencer is not at all opposed to artful writing, to rhetorical nourish, or to poetry.

      Contrasts general enlightenment thought, but especially Astell:

      "But we shou'd fold up our Thoughts so closely and neatly, expressing them in such significant tho few words, as that the Readers Mind may easily open and enlarge them. And if this can be done with facility we are Perspicuous as well as Strong, if with difficulty or not at all, we're then perplext and Obscure Writers" (852).

  6. Jan 2017
    1. nation's bedrooms, leading him to back down.

      even though the EU doesn't approve of polygamy, they still didn't appreciate when the Prime Minister "intervened" in peoples private lives.

    2. criminalizing adultery

      for many people they believe that polygamy is criminal like but for others it is a huge part of their culture and normal. This is an interesting balance

  7. Feb 2016
    1. Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story (e.g., Cinderella stories) by different authors or from different cultures.

      This would require child to read different versions of the same story in order to understand different cultures. Students can make Venn diagrams or use other graphic organizers to compare and contrast

      any of the classic fairy tales, cinderella, little red riding hood and more would help teach this standard.

  8. Feb 2014
    1. Intellectual property is far more egalitarian. Of limited duration and obtainable by anyone, intellectual property can be seen as a reward, an empowering instrument, for the talented upstarts Burke sought to restrain. Intellectual property is often the propertization of what we call "talent." It tends to shift the balance toward the talented newcomers whom Burke mistrusted

      intellectual property is often the propertization of what we call talent.

  9. Nov 2013
    1. The venerability, reliability, and utility of truth is something which a person demonstrates for himself from the contrast with the liar, whom no one trusts and everyone excludes.

      The idea that truth exists only in contrast to its opposite, with no fundamental autonomous, self-determining, independent, or sovereign foundation.

    2. For even our contrast between individual and species is something anthropomorphic and does not originate in the essence of things; although we should not presume to claim that this contrast does not correspond o the essence of things: that would of course be a dogmatic assertion and, as such, would be just as indemonstrable as its opposite.

      An interesting point that "we should not presume to claim that this contrast does not correspond o the essence of things".

  10. Oct 2013
    1. And the speaker has it in his discretion to use the subdued style even where the majestic would be allowable, in order that the majestic when it is used may be the more majestic by comparison, and may as it were shine out with greater brilliance from the dark background

      This is a little tangential, but it like our use of exclamation points today. They are so overused they have no meaning or emphasis anymore