7 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2016
    1. When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter’s power — upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world external to our minds awakes. It does not follow that we shall use that power well upon any plane. We may put a deadly green upon a man’s face and produce a horror; we may make the rare and terrible blue moon to shine; or we may cause woods to spring with silver leaves and rams to wear fleeces of gold, and put hot fire into the belly of the cold worm. But in such “fantasy,” as it is called, new form is made; Faerie begins; Man becomes a sub-creator.

      "When we can take green from grass, blue from heaven, and red from blood, we have already an enchanter’s power — upon one plane; and the desire to wield that power in the world external to our minds awakes... we may put a deadly green upon a man’s face and produce a horror; we may make the rare and terrible blue moon to shine; or we may cause woods to spring with silver leaves and rams to wear fleeces of gold, and put hot fire into the belly of the cold worm. But in such “fantasy,” as it is called, new form is made; Faerie begins; Man becomes a sub-creator.

  2. Aug 2016
    1. The consistency of the inner world must be rigorous for the spell of enchantment to be successful

      How does this statement apply to the pluralistic, decentralized, anarchistic world(s) of solarpunk?

    2. In the experience of ‘enchantment‘, the reader does not merely suspend disbelief but is drawn into an exploration of a created world.

      This is what Transition design needs, and what solarpunk is currently doing in an undisciplined way—but is ultimately very much capable of.

    3. Tolkien uses the term “Art” to describe “the operative link between Imagination and the final result, Sub‐creation”

      !!!! Not just world-building, but sub-creation—theological!

    4. “(enchantment) produces a Secondary World into which both designer and spectator can enter, to the satisfaction of their senses while they are inside; but in’ its purity it is artistic in desire and purpose”

      This is Coleridge's power, per Gareth Knight—the power of mythopoeia.