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  1. Jan 2019
    1. The implemented designof ChronoShare uses an approach that treats indi-vidual user operations on les as streams of \ac-tions," where each action speci es which le hasbeen modi ed and what changes have been made,e.g., new le, updated content, changed le sys-tem permissions, or removed le (Figure 2.10). Ac-tions are carried in NDN data packets, thus they arenamed and signed, automatically adding ownershipinformation for each operation. By applying actionsfrom all participants in a deterministic order, in combination with the con ict resolution process described,each ChronoShare user can build her consistent up-to-date view of the shared folder and, when desired, fetchall missing les. The main advantage of this action-based approach is that, in typical shared folder usagescenarios, no matter how many changes a user might have made to the shared folder, there is a straightfor-ward way to propagate changes to other participants: Others just need to fetch all actions from the user andapply these actions to their folder. Actions by each user form a \stream" of data items, and the streamsfrom all users of a shared folder form a dataset that can be synchronized using the ChronoSync primitive.

      ChronoShare Intro

    2. The routing protocol developmentcontinues to progress in two parallel directions: conventional routing (Named-data Link State Routing,NLSR [4]) and update-less greedy routing (Hyperbolic Routing, HR [3]) (Section 5.1)

      The routing protocol development continues to progress in two parallel directions:<br> Conventional routing (Named-data Link State Routing,NLSR [4]) and Update-less greedy routing (Hyperbolic Routing, HR [3])

    3. e completed the design and eval-uation of PartialSync (pSync) [5]. We also conducted a thorough comparative study of the di erent syncprotocols we have developed over the last few years, including CCNx Sync [1], iSync [6], ChronoSync [8],RoundSync [2], and pSync.

      We completed the design and evaluation of Partial Sync (pSync) [5]. We also conducted a thorough comparative study of the different sync protocols we have developed over the last few years, including CCNx Sync [1], iSync [6], ChronoSync [8], RoundSync [2], and pSync.

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    1. Data producer signsdata with a digital signature..•.. so the consumers know when they get bad data!•.. so data can come from any node that has a copy.
    1. It is widely accepted that creative design is not a matter of first fixing the problem and then searching for a satisfactory solution concept; instead it seems more to be a matter of developing and refining together both the formulation of the problem and ideas for its solution
    1. In this article, we have modelled and quantified the related im-pact of a Name Resolution Server (NRS) on each content’s deliverycost based on its popularity, size, availability, and its locality, i.e.,local or external content

      In this article, we have modelled and quantified the related impact of a Name Resolution Server (NRS) on each content’s delivery cost based on its popularity, size, availability, and its locality, i.e.,local or external content. Then, we have identified the content objects whose delivery cost substantially decreases in the existence of the NRS by solving our optimization problem which minimizes the expected cost of content delivery within an AS given a size constraint for the NRS. Our results suggest that an AS can increase its cache hit ratio, decrease its inter-AS traffic and data access latency with the help of an NRS which indexes only a small fraction of the requested content set.

    2. Current ICN architectures apply eithername resolutionservicewhich implements a logically centralizedlookup-by-nameapproach, e.g. the rendezvous point in the PSIRP/PURSUIT archi-tecture [11], orroute-by-nameapproaches, e.g. NDN/CCNx [27],or a combination of both, e.g. as in SCANDEX [20]

      Current ICN architectures apply either name resolution service which implements a logically centralized lookup-by name approach, e.g. the rendezvous point in the PSIRP/PURSUIT architecture [11], or route-by-name approaches, e.g. NDN/CCNx [27],or a combination of both, e.g. as in SCANDEX

    3. A key strength of an Information-Centric Network (ICN) lies inits capability to leverage the content copies stored temporarily inthe in-network caches

      A key strength of an Information-Centric Network (ICN) lies in its capability to leverage the content copies stored temporarily in the in-network caches

    4. The AS hosts an NRS for indexingthe temporary content copies and a server for local publisherinformation, i.e., permanent copies. External networks are ab-stracted as a single external AS whose content can be accessedvia inter-domain routing and is subject to monetary cost basedon AS peering relations.

      The AS hosts an NRS for indexing the temporary content copies and a server for local publisher information, i.e., permanent copies. External networks are abstracted as a single external AS whose content can be accessed via inter-domain routing and is subject to monetary cost based on AS peering relations.

    5. How doesan NRS which stores locators for the cached copies of the contentitems affect bandwidth efficiency and content discovery/retrievalcost? Can we have an NRS that indexes only some of the contentbut brings most of the benefits?

      How does an NRS which stores locators for the cached copies of the content items affect bandwidth efficiency and content discovery/retrieval cost? Can we have an NRS that indexes only some of the content but brings most of the benefits?

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    1. Name resolution : matches/translates a content name to locators of providers/sources that can provide the content. Content discovery : routes the content request towards the content either based on its name or locator. Content delivery : transfers the content to the requester.

      Name resolution : matches/translates a content name to locators of providers/sources that can provide the content.

      Content Discovery : routes the content request towards the content either based on its name or locator.

      Content Delivery : transfers the content to the requester.

    2. The Name Resolution Service (NRS) in ICN is defined as the service that provides the name resolution function translating an object name into some other information such as locator and another name that is used for forwarding the object request. In other words, the NRS is the service that shall be provided by ICN infrastructure to help a consumer to reach a specific piece of content, service, or host using a persistent name when the name resolution is needed. The name resolution is a necessary process in ICN routing although the name resolution either can be separated from the content discovery as a standalone process or can be integrated with the content discovery as one combined process. The former is referred as standalone name resolution approach, the latter is referred as name based routing approach in this document.

      Definition of Name Resolution Service of ICN

      The Name Resolution Service (NRS) in ICN is defined as the service that provides the name resolution function translating an object name into some other information such as locator and another name that is used for forwarding the object request. In other words, the NRS is the service that shall be provided by ICN infrastructure to help a consumer to reach a specific piece of content, service, or host using a persistent name when the name resolution is needed.

    3. Comparisons of name resolution approaches

      Different Approaches of Name Resolutions

      1. Update Message Overhead
      2. Resolution Capability
      3. Node Failure Impact
      4. Maintained Databases