104 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. May 2017
    1. The strategy proved so successful in higher education that Mr. Casap decided to try it with public schools.

      So the Google strategy does have its roots in higher ed, though it is now most identified with K-12.

    2. I cannot answer for them what they are going to do with the quadratic equation.

      Ha! This is one of Roger Schenck's familiar examples in his criticisms of schooling...

    3. Google Classroom

      Is this the Google version of the LMS?

  3. Mar 2017
    1. I hope to explore this updated platform in the future.

      Julie Shahid has been using the new version, and the results have been good so far...

    2. The user analytics component of CS provides charts and graphs of class activity, student commentaries, and my responses. I’m able to keep track of when and how long students are active, the length of their responses, and if any questions were asked or answered in each task.

      I think you're the only one using CS who has employed the analytic tools...glad to know that you have found them helpful.

    3.  CS is also a good tool for managing assignments and tracking student activity. Assignments are easy to upload, store, and find.

      Great to hear...we've had several grantees using CS, with varying degrees of satisfaction. Perhaps those who were less impressed with it might pick up some ideas from those of you who have had successful implementations.

    4. This approach has proven to be especially effective for the quieter students in the class

      This is a very positive benefit...

    5. environment of accountability

      I really like the way you phrased this. Other collaborative projects also seem to bear out the fact that students feel motivated to up their game when the know that their work will be analyzed and evaluated by their peers.

    6. Students were assigned the task of analyzing their classmates’ works

      Did you assign who reviewed what, or allow students to pick and choose whose work they reviewed?

    7. working on their own creative works (a story or a poem),

      So what genre did most students create—poems, short stories, or something else?

    1. The video was then uploaded it to YouTube, and students used the captioning tool in YouTube to create the transcription in Spanish and the translated English subtitles.

      So, to be clear, they will eventually be producing two videos...one with Spanish captioning, and one with English?

    2. The creativity involved in the process of conveying an audio recording in a visual and textual format has proven especially motivating for the students. Each group expressed a different visual style and included distinct elements in their storytelling.

      This is very compelling...its sounds as though all the groups worked together very well.

    3. adding their own visual interpretation of the audio text

      So did they mostly use images and photos that you had given them, or did they go out and find more of them on their own?

    1. Simulation-based pedagogy offers an experiential learning process that emphasizes repeated action, reflection, accommodation, and testing.

      There are a possibilities for using simulation and game-based pedagogies across the curriculum, I believe ... your experience speaks to the benefits that can come from such strategies.

    2. This indicates that the simulation promotes better decision making by helping students see how their decisions can affect the performance of others and the organization as a whole.

      This is some solid evidence that the simulation is making a real difference in student learning outcomes.

    3. The goal is to achieve strategic dominance in the marketplace

      That is a very audacious goal...does the simulation deal with the ethical dimensions of business practice in any way?

    4. However, observing how well students handled the decision making process in the simulation, I upgraded the difficulty to a very high level in Spring 2017.

      Well we're very happy to hear that the students are doing so well!

    1. We were trained in a world of pen, paper, and heavy dictionaries, where if we didn’t understand the text it was our own individual failing. However, when the burden of understanding and of deciphering the text is on everyone, and students and instructor alike help each other move beyond comprehending the foreign words on the page, they can together move towards the more difficult work of understanding what the text is trying to do and what interest and value it holds.

      Such a valuable example of reflective practice here, comparing one's own learning environment and noting how different is the learning environment of today's students. And you are not even that much older than they are :)

    2. they record themselves having a conversation with a classmate

      How are these recordings then used by the students (and by you)?

    3. If students are asked to annotate texts by leaving definitions, asking follow-up questions, providing brief summaries, or pointing out particularly important quotes or ideas, they may find academic writing and research more approachable and engaging.

      Exactly, and it's why I'm so excited to see you project take off. I am looking forward to comparing your use of Annotation Studio with Brian Watkins' use of Hypothes.is as platforms for annotation.

    4. (Annotation Studio and Annotate

      Familiar with the first, but not the second...could you link to that second one?

    5. second classroom

      Could there be further "classrooms" in online spaces...dialogue and practice with native speakers on, say, Twitter and other platforms, for example?

    1. Writing assignments will be given via blogging.

      Great! This will help build the blogging community at the college.

    2. Justin and I will use a publishing software or platform, such as Scalar, to create an eBook rather than a printed book.

      A good choice, since Scalar is designed from the ground up as a digitally-native platform for book creation...and it's free and cross-platform.

    3. greater focus on digital art and graphics tools

      Looking forward to seeing how this develops

    4. the history of the book

      Would love to know what resources you used to teach about the history of the book.

    5. The digital component of this course was composed of creating art through art simulation software and graphic arts/pen tablets while collaborating and communicating with the students via Moodle course modules.

      "Art simulation software" ... that's a category I had never heard of :)

    1. a few takeaways that can have broader impact

      These are excellent ideas that should be widely applicable across our faculty and curriculum

    2. this will have some advertising and recruitment benefits

      YES...any evidence of this should be very compelling.

    3. open to anyone.

      Open online learning comes to Austin College...yay!

    1. I would like to end this report with student responses to some questions that I have asked for each offering of the flipped course.

      Thanks for including this data...extremely helpful.

    2. I don’t know if it is due to the flipped class or the requirement of Biochemistry for medical school.

      Well, wasn't Biochem a requirement for med school previously? If so, drop in D/W then very likely due to flip.

    3. It has been a major comment on my student evaluations that many students do not find these question-answer class sessions to be particularly useful

      I'm confused...is this statement referring to pre-flipped versions of the course, or is it reporting feedback on the flipped version? If the latter, seems inconsistent with what you said earlier in the paragraph.

    4. students are asking more than surface questions.

      This is really a great outcome, and, as you say, prompts you to up your game in return.

    5. I find the class much more dynamic in this format,

      Excellent...

    1. possible to annotate digital audio files, like Soundcloud allows

      I am not familiar with how annotation works on Soundcloud, so will have to check that out...thanks for the tip!

    2. a way of managing burn-out in a repetitive task

      So students were actually having "burn-out?" So yeah, the problem may be that students not only skip the annotation requirement, but skip the reading itself.

    3. the quality of their comments were light years ahead of previous course discussions

      Light years!

    1. Doing these tasks in Classroom Salon is very time-consuming.

      Is the extra time correlated to deeper student engagement and more insightful commentary on the pieces? Would be very helpful if I could see a couple of examples to get a feel for what you're dealing with...

    2. There is a new version that works somewhat differently that I might try. And there might be new applications that have come along in the past two years that may be better fits.

      Just let me know when you'd like to get together and take a look at options :)

    3. Classroom Salon does not support that

      I can't think of any system that would guarantee and prove that students had listened to what they said they had listened to.

    4. with them students must list the length of time for each individual piece)

      Couldn't the students just indicate in an annotation at the beginning of the piece exactly what and how much they listened to?

    5. each time a student makes an annotation in their listening, a heading is required for organization

      Wouldn't the use of tags be a better way to organize and categorize the annotations?

    1. Student feedback on lecturing format, recordings, and digital grading has been net positive.

      Do you have a sense of the impact on learning outcomes?

    2. fact sheet

      Could we link to this?

    3. a copy of the assignment and all feedback was retained for future reference.

      Do the students have access to their assignments and feedback after the class has ended? Or is their only access through Moodle?

    1. I plan to have students include these videos and annotations in their electronic portfolios

      First, kudos for using electronic portfolios. Are you all still using the LiveBinders platform? How does including the videos in a portfolio correlate to the privacy of the classroom salon studio?

    2. debriefing the student teachers.

      Would like to hear more about what is involved in "debriefing the student teachers." What kind of process, questions, prompts for reflection, etc. did you use?

    1. this lab experience was able to parallel the student’s life in providing opportunity of digitally chronicling events through picture.

      So again, incorporating visual elements into the composition process increases overall literacy and enhances enthusiasm for lab work. In the end, was your assessment of student performance in the lab this semester significantly higher than in previous semesters?

    2. requires clear and frequent communication to students of expectations of obstacles and challenges that may come

      Had you had extensive previous experience with LabArchives prior to this course? Did you expect the obstacles and challenges that arose, or did these take you by surprise? Based on what you've learned from this first go round with the technology, what adjustments will you make with the next iteration?

    3. Students’ attitudes toward the laboratory experience were certainly more positive because of the use of the technology

      And this positive affective component should contribute to longer-lasting retention of learning.

    4. the use of lab partners became almost a necessity

      Enhancing collaborative learning with ELNs...definitively contributes to learning objectives.

    5. Students took pictures and video throughout the lab to show the setup, illustrate color and color changes, and describe products.

      Very cool...would be great to see some examples. From your perspective as the instructor, does the incorporation of visuals into the reports deepen student learning and knowledge creation, or is it more just a nice illustrative addition?

    6. Over the course of the semester, the students’ comfort level improved such that, by the end, they had the process mastered.

      This nicely describes the arc of learning, from initial confusion and frustration, through improvement, reaching toward mastery.

  4. Feb 2017
    1. After all, we spend great sums for disciplines aimed at understanding and harnessing nuclear power. Why not consider developing a discipline aimed at understanding and harnessing “neural power?” In the long run, the power of the human intellect is really much the more important of the two

      A beautiful closing statement!

    2. work in parallel independence on the joint structure

      Nice phrase...captures the interplay of the individual and the collaborative

    3. they meet at their concept and terminology interface and work out little shifts in meaning and use which each can find digestible in his system, and which permit quite precise definitions in each system of the terms and concepts in the others

      A great description of how we learn and advance by getting an insight into the webs and trails of the brains of others,

    4. If any two want to work simultaneously on the same material, they simply duplicate and each starts reshaping his version–and later it is easy to merge their contributions.

      An early vision of GitHub?

    5. We feel that the effect of these augmentation developments upon group methods and group capability is actually going to be more pronounced than the effect upon individuals methods and capabilities, and we are very eager to increase our research effort in that direction

      And so the real amplification comes about because now a connected group of investigators can collaborate on their materials in a more immediate way ... the materials and processes are visible and shared,

    6. Many of the external composing and manipulating (modifying, rearranging) processes serve such characteristically “human” activities as playing with forms and relationships to ask what develops, cut-and-try multiple-pass development of an idea, or listing items to reflect on and then rearranging and extending them as thoughts develop

      "Playing with forms and relationships to ask what develops..." This is a great description of how emergent learning can take place ... the outcomes are not pre-ordained or predictable, but rather a matter of discovery and insight that comes about through "play."

    7. We refer to a way of life in an integrated domain where hunches, cut-and-try, intangibles, and the human “feel for a situation” usefully co-exist with powerful concepts, streamlined terminology and notation, sophisticated methods, and high-powered electronic aids.

      This description of an "integrated domain," combining distinctively human capabilities such as intuition and a "feel for the situation" with "high-powered electronic aids" calls to mind the description of contemporary chess players as described by Clive Thompson in the chapter "The Rise of the Centaurs" in his book, Smarter Than You Think. How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better. The best players today are those who have augmented their intelligence with the most sophisticated chess engines and analysis tools. Generalizing this idea, Thompson says, "We're all playing advanced chess these days. We just haven't learned to appreciate it."

    8. many other capabilities for manipulating and displaying information

      And here is the clear articulation, revolutionary at the time, that computers could do more than "compute" in the narrow sense, i.e. number crunching. "Symbolized concepts" could be "manipulated and displayed" in "nonmathematical" ways.

    9. repertoire hierarchy

      I'm intrigued by this phrase and wonder what Engelbart is referring to

    10. rearranging

      The term "rearranging" keeps appearing in this essay...reminds me of Gardner's term "combinatorial disposition" .... the propensity to seek a more intelligible synthesis of discrete elements by continually recombining them in new shapes and patterns and forms, as in a bricolage.

    1. Building critical literacies around information and digital technologies takes time.

    2. what happens when you get the technology part but you leave out the metacognitive part? Bush does not seem to consider this option but I think this is often the world that we live in today.

      It seems that our conversation about AWMT focused on using annotation to create a deliberate trail through well verified sources. But as you say, we all leave much larger and ambiguous trails through everything we do online. And I have no idea what an outfit like CA would make of my complete online record.

    1. revelatory juxtapositions

    2. the way familiar texts reveal new layers of meaning and implication

    3. the poem of the self that we draft each day, writing ourselves into being yet once more

    4. you start to understand at least a little about how an experimental physicist views the world

      This is an excellent example of the notion that achieving competence and, perhaps, mastery in a domain is a matter of "learning how to think like an x," when x may be a physicist, a mathematician, a historian, a psychologist, etc. Not just a detached grasp of a certain body of "content," but a level of conversational ability within a community of inquiry and practice.

    5. discipleship

      Intrigued by the way that terms with theological resonance to me ("revelatory" juxtaposition, discipleship) subtly working their way into the essay...

    6. affirmation at all

      Wow, this whole paragraph...and it's one sentence!

    7. divergent-convergent meta-education

      I am curious about this phrase!

    8. combinatorial disposition

      I love this phrase, which takes me back to days of teaching combinatorics, as part of a basic intro to probability. And indeed, the occurrence of these "revelatory juxtapositions" is a matter not of strict necessity but of probability, of the providential coincidence of elements both in the learning environment and in the learner, as you point out.

    1. This focus on the learner is a big mistake. We should look at the whole learning system and how it works—the learner, teacher, technologist, administration, community.

      Some pushback here against "student-centered" learning. I think there is some validity here...need to focus on entire system. But also real sense in which learning should be "subject-matter centered" in that any given domain of SM possesses certain intelligibilities that are not open to manipulation by learners. We all must have appropriate epistemic humility in order to let reality present its own intelligible order to us. This is the basis for "learning to think like a __" in whatever field of study one is in.

  5. Jan 2017
    1. For mature thought there is no mechanical substitute

      Yes! Let's highlight this...no technology can substitute for the cognitional acts that produce understanding and insight. Technological affordances may contribute to the conditions for the possibility of insight, but they never replace the intelligence that grasps a unifying idea in a set of particular and otherwise randomly associated data.

    2. Britannica

      I wonder if Bush could have foreseen, not just that the traditional stores of records would become astoundingly more accessible, but that technologies would enable new forms of building such records based on opening the processes of knowledge production and editing...here I am thinking of the comparison of the Britannica with Wikipedia, and those analyses that regard them as comparably authoritative sources of knowledge

    1. Openness creates a virtuous cycle

      But, if "open" is used to indicate that "a resource may be used in any way imaginable," then the cycle is by no means necessarily "virtuous." Again, the need for an ethical framework to this discussion is obvious.

    2. “phraseological neologisms

      This is so meta...I think "phraseological neologism" is itself an example of a "phraseological neologism."

    3. In other words, “open” is being used here not to indicate the resource itself, but rather to indicate the nature of the tools used to build the resource, or by which resources are provided.

      This use of open reminds me of the theme of "observable work," "working out loud," and "thinking out loud" that Jon Udell and others have spoken about. These are practices that perhaps, at least at first, benefit the original workers and thinkers, in that they open themselves to constructive feedback and thus improvement. Then, however, others benefit from access and use of both the product and the process that has been created and refined.

    4. Jenkins, et al. (2009) argue that much of what we consider received culture is the product of appropriation and remixing, from the Iliad to Lewis Carroll

      I love these historical examples of "remixing." Reminds me of older forms of scholarship which promoted commentary and exegesis before the production of "original" work.

  6. Jun 2016
    1. The instructions at the PressBooks installation page, starting at Part 2, were pretty clear.

      I'm glad you found them clear...I had some problems following along (and I already had WP multisite going). First, they have you uploading the plug-in file to the wp-content folder on the server (on Reclaim), instead of using the regular procedure for installing plug-ins in the WP dashboard. Took me a minute to figure that out. Then they have you network activate the plugin. I must be missing something...isn't the whole point to not have PB take over all of your network sites?

      What I did was to first create a new subdomain, and then install the PB plugin to that subdomain only. Now I can create new books, where each new book is a new subdomain. Seems to be working just fine.

  7. Apr 2016
    1. Colleagues at the conference were intrigued by the project and proposed several interesting observations and questions

      I'm really excited to see how annotation might spread on our campus, given the enthusiastic response at the workshop. We have several more digital pedagogy grants to award in the coming year, so maybe some more folks will get the annotation bug.

  8. Mar 2016
    1. I haven’t looked into it yet, but I don’t think I can make the .pdf page itself private

      Your post prompted me to look into this, and there doesn't seem to be any easy way to do it. Even if media is linked/embedded on a page/post marked "private," it is still publicly accessible to anyone with direct URL to media file. Surprised that there isn't a plug-in that addresses this.

      Of course, if you have wordpress.org, and need to keep a media file private, you could store it in the public_html folder of your domain and link to it there, instead of putting it in WP media library.

  9. Nov 2015
    1. enormous geographical extent

      a new annotation

    2. Lousiades

      Where are the Lousiades?

  10. Oct 2015
    1. pottery, sago, canoes, dried fish and yams

      Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Donec quam metus, sodales vitae est nec, tincidunt pretium urna. Maecenas sem eros, ullamcorper vel interdum tempus, imperdiet vel sapien. Nunc mattis vel est sit amet varius. Suspendisse rhoncus lectus sed ex auctor dignissim. Nunc finibus malesuada nisl, in accumsan lectus blandit ac. Donec scelerisque nibh odio. Fusce diam sapien, facilisis sed ipsum fringilla, condimentum maximus nibh. Ut et velit eget est sodales viverra. Integer tempor nunc ac turpis dictum, id faucibus massa fermentum. Nam dictum, sapien nec auctor hendrerit, risus est accumsan justo, eget bibendum ipsum odio eget mauris. In faucibus massa velit, in finibus ipsum tempus facilisis. Duis euismod porttitor ultricies. Phasellus ac purus quis purus elementum rhoncus.

    2. Gulf of Papua

      Gulf of Papua

    3. Dr. Seligman's Melanesians.

      Charles G. Seligman, The Melanesians of British New Guinea

    4. trading system, the Kula,

      <iframe width="853" height="480" src="&lt;a href=" https:="" <a="" href="http://www.youtube.com" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">www.youtube.com="" embed="" BjI-4pAnbNU"="" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noopener">https://www.youtube.com/embed/BjI-4pAnbNU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe>

    5. Conus millepunctatus

      Now referred to as Conus leopardus; see the World Register of Marine Species

  11. Sep 2015
    1. PJ O’Rourke’s Eat the Rich is a fantastic example of academic writing.

      Do you really mean to say "fantastic"?

    1. the intellectual effectiveness exercised today by a given human has little likelihood of being intelligence limited

    1. Whether in persuasive essays, scientific reports, or creative expression, all academic disciplines value clear and compelling prose. The act of writing visually demonstrates our thought processes: how we respond to ideas that challenge our own thinking, consider alternative perspectives or counter-evidence, and create entirely new points of view. As college educators, we recognize that our students become more engaged in the writing process when they draft, share, and respond to writing with a community of peer readers who encourage and challenge them to revise muddled first drafts into more polished, thoughtful essays. Moreover, we now realize how a new generation of web-based writing tools—including wikis, Google Documents, WordPress, and others—can transform how our students author, edit, publish, and comment on texts in ways that advance, rather than distract from, our liberal arts mission. But exactly how college educators can make use of these tools in our classrooms is not simple, and requires both time and support from our institutions. Our motivation behind this book is to offer faculty a wide range of web-based writing examples across the liberal arts, to help all of us to rethink our current approaches and inspire us to innovate with our own students.

  12. Jul 2015
    1. The problem with teaching history is the focus by its educators to “remember” history.

      This is a broad statement that seems to refer to all teaching of history at all levels. Have you experienced a qualitative difference in the teaching of history between middle/high school and college? What has been your experience at Austin College?

      Another question that arises is the distinction between "remembering" and "understanding." Do you imply a separation between these two? I would content that "understanding" is deeply reliant on memory, on having a sense of recall of key elements of, say, a historical event.

  13. Jun 2015
    1. Let us consider an augmented architect at work. He sits at a working station that has a visual display screen some three feet on a side; this is his working surface, and is controlled by a computer (his “clerk” ) with which he can communicate by means of a small keyboard and various other devices.

      Compare this with how architects actually work today.

    2. After all, we spend great sums for disciplines aimed at understanding and harnessing nuclear power. Why not consider developing a discipline aimed at understanding and harnessing “neural power?”

      Remember the context of this statement, coming at the height of the Cold War and the nuclear standoff with the Soviets.