3 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The IAB Transparency and Consent Framework supports both Server-specific consent and Global consent. The former is given by the consumer to a Publisher or Vendor to access their browser and/or perform the requested processing purposes where a Publisher or vendor requires consent for their site

      Consent for the publisher to "access their browser"? Hmm. The Web is a pull-based, client/server, request/response model, not a push model. So it seems odd to me to talk about a publisher needing consent to "access" the user's browser. It is the user's browser (user agent) that made the HTTP request to the publisher's web server. Doesn't the publisher have the right, then, to send a response containing whatever content they wish, since the user requested the content? If the client wishes to filter/block/exclude some of that content, it seems like they have that right, but it seems the responsibility for that is on the client side, not the server side.

      Not that I like ads, but I wonder how much of these new policies are based on a misunderstanding of how web technologies actually work....

      Maybe the distinction is that the publisher of whom you requested content may dynamically load content (ads) from 3rd parties that the user did not specifically request content from? That too is just how the web works, and it is the publisher who controls what other content to load from other domains/sources. But it still may be a worthwhile distinction...?

  2. May 2020
    1. If we already have a shared ssh key to push things up from the server to Gitlab, why do we need to do all this just to get Gitlab to send commands for our server to run?
  3. Mar 2020
    1. Well, the checkbox type has nothing to do with AI, but I’ve read that the type where you have to select “Which picture is …” does collect data to train AIs. It seems dear Dave is confusing between the 2 types.