12 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. I may suffer from the want of money. Younger sons cannot marry where they like.”

      In 18th century finances, typically, the oldest son is the one who usually inherits most of the family money and estates, leaving the younger sons to look for wealth through marriages to women of wealthy families. "Younger sons with no expectations of succeeding to any paternal property, might come to inherit the estates of much wealthier families to whose heiresses they could never have hoped to aspire."

      Clay, Christopher. “Marriage, Inheritance, and the Rise of Large Estates in England, 1660-1815.” The Economic History Review, vol. 21, no. 3, 1968, pp. 503–518. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2592747.

    2. Parsonage

      A church house provided for a member of the clergy. A rectory or vicarage" (OED).

    3. Hunsford

      Fictional home of Mr. Collins and Charlotte, located near Rosings Park in Kent. Also near Westerham.

      Image is of the Old Rectory at Heigh in Rutland from the set of the 1995 BBC version of Pride & Prejudice.

    4. rencontre

      French. Used in the 1800s as a variant form of rencounter. "To encounter or meet, usually under negative circumstances" (OED).

    5. haunt

      "A place in which one is frequently found; habit of being in a certain place" (Johnson).

      • A Dictionary of the English Language, Volume 1 By Samuel Johnson, John Walker, Robert S. Jameson
  2. May 2019
    1. prodigious

      "Amazing or astonishing"

      • A Dictionary of the English Language, Volume 1 By Samuel Johnson, John Walker, Robert S. Jameson
    2. spirits

      "In a lively or strong manner."

      • A Dictionary of the English Language, Volume 1 By Samuel Johnson, John Walker, Robert S. Jameson
    3. pales

      "Picket-style fence made of wooden stakes" (OED).

    4. arts

      Arts typically refer to "science, reason and creative imagination" (OED). Elizabeth uses this term to refer to Darcy's imagination or his reasoning.

    5. officious

      "Assertive of authority in a domineering way, especially with regard to trivial matters, annoying, pestering." (OED).

    6. propriety

      "Formal, behavior that is accepted as socially or morally correct and proper. The state or quality of being correct and proper" (OED).

    7. caprice

      "Freak, fancy, whim"

      • A Dictionary of the English Language Volume 1 By Samuel Johnson, John Walker, Robert S. Jameson

      "A sudden and unaccountable change of mood or behavior" (OED).