4 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. In the simple biology example, dog is a hypernym and Fido is one of its hyponyms. A word can be both a hyponym and a hypernym. For example, dog is a hyponym of mammal and also a hypernym of Fido.

      I wish they hadn't used tokens/objects in this example. Wouldn't it be just as clear or clearer if they had stuck to only comparing types/classes?

      It may be okay to mix them like that in some contexts, but in other cases it seems like this would be suffering from ignoring/conflating/[better word?] the Type–token distinction.

      Does linguistics just not make the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type%E2%80%93token_distinction ?

      This statement seems to reinforce that idea:

      words that are examples of categories are hyponyms

      because an example of a category/class/type could be either a sub-class or an instance of that category/class/type, right?

    1. For instance English has a domain ‘Rain’, which includes words such as rain, drizzle, downpour, raindrop, puddle.

      "rain" seems more like a semantic field — a group of very related or nearly synonymous words — than a semantic field.

      Esp. when you consider the later example of basketball (https://hyp.is/ynKbXI1BEeuEheME3sLYrQ/en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semantic_domain) and coffee shop, which are more like the sense of "field" that means (academic/scientific/etc.) discipline.

  2. May 2020
    1. of, relating to, or being a grammatical case or form expressing means or agency

      I really need an example of this!

      It seems unusual that they specifically mention "a grammatical case or form". I've never seen a definition before that is anything like this one.

      How is this different from definition 1?

    1. In algebra, for some set S together with an operation ⋆ {\displaystyle \star } to form a group, it is necessary that ⋆ {\displaystyle \star } be associative.

      Seems like a simpler example (of individually necessary and jointly sufficient) that is easier to follow could be found.