2 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2017
    1. Labrador
      Newfoundland and Labrador is a province of Canada composed of the island of Newfoundland and Labrador to the northwest of Newfoundland. Newfoundland is the larger mainland sector of the province. It is the youngest province of the ten provinces making up the country of Canada. It joined the confederation in 1949. In 2001, its name was officially changed to Newfoundland and Labrador. Newfoundland was originally called “newfoundelande,” or New Found Land, by late 15th century explorers. The island of Newfoundland is separated from Labrador by the Strait of Belle Isle and from Novia Scotia by Cabot Strait. Due to its position as the most easterly land of North America, it has been important in defense, transportation, and communications. The economy, culture, and history of Newfoundland and Labrador has been shaped greatly by the fishing communities on the coastline which stretch along about 14,400 miles of the coast. The most plentiful mammals of Newfoundland are the moose, which were introduced to the area in the early 20th century. Labrador, however, has more caribou than moose. Other species that can be found in Newfoundland and Labrador are black bears, polar bears, arctic foxes, red foxes, beavers, lynx, harp seals, hooded seals, whales, and some small fur-bearing animals. The capital of Newfoundland and Labrador is St. John’s. The population in 2011 was approximately 514,536. The total area of Newfoundland and Labrador is 156,453 square miles, with Newfoundland being 42,031 square miles and Labrador being 113,641 square miles (Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. 2017). 
      

      References

      Encyclopaedia Britannica, Inc. . 2017. Newfoundland and Labrador. Accessed May 8, 2017. https://www.britannica.com/place/Newfoundland-and-Labrador.

    2. Churchill Falls hydro-electric project
      The Churchill Falls hydro-electric project was inaugurated by Pierre Trudeau, the Canadian Prime Minister, on June 16, 1972. This hydro-electric plant was constructed between 1967 and 1975 and completed one year ahead of the predicted schedule. At the height of its construction, approximately 6,300 workers were present in the summer of 1970. The majority of construction occurred in the summer months, although construction continued year-round despite harsh conditions in Labrador where temperatures dipped to -21°C with a mean annual snowfall of 406 centimeters. The Churchill Falls power station is located in southern Labrador about 1,100 kilometers from an urban area. The Churchill Falls hydro-electric project was the largest hydro-electric project at the time, capable of generating 5,225 mW of electricity. It creates this energy by utilizing the water of the Churchill and Naskaupi Rivers which have a total catchment area of about 67,340 km2 combined. The underground power station is about 305 meters below ground. It uses eleven generators with a combined capacity of 5,225,000 kW. In order to utilize this harvested energy, large power lines capable of handling voltages up to 735 kV were put in place to transmit the energy from Churchill Falls to the Hydro-Quebec transmission system in the Manicouagan-Outardes hydro complex. The distance between these two stations is 606 kilometers. The energy from Churchill Falls was also transmitted via power lines to the Labrador City-Wabush area (Crabb, 1973). 
      

      References

      Crabb, P. (1973). Churchill Falls- The Costs and Benefits of a Hydro-Electric Development Project. Geography, 330-335.