2 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. Our atmosphere and oceans can absorb only so much heat before climate change, intensified by various feedback loops, spins completely out of control. The consensus among scientists and policy-makers is that we’ll pass this point of no return if the global mean temperature rises by more than two degrees Celsius (maybe a little more, but also maybe a little less).

      Biogeophysical feedbacks have different tipping points. Some are in the range of the 2ºC limit, while others would occur at higher temperature anomalies. For example, a critical transition in the Atlantic Meridional Ocean Circulation (AMOC) is not expected beyond 3ºC

  2. Oct 2015
    1. Severe storms, floods and agricultural losses may cost a great deal of money, but such extreme weather events – and their resulting costs – are dramatically declining as the Earth modestly warms.

      To the best of my knowledge, there is no scientific evidence showing that severe storms and flood are "dramatically declining". Such a strong statement should be supported by a strong reference.

      To the contrary, as the atmosphere warms, water vapor content increases, and this is allowing more extreme rainfall events, notably during hurricanes.

      see eg: Trenberth (2011) Changes in precipitation with climate change