6 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2018
    1. I enjoy the works of Oliver Sacks because of his genuine interest in people and he never imposes the pretensions of narrow mindedness. This, to me, is the same reason I enjoy the works of Samuel Beckett. He does not use umbrella diagnoses, instead examines individual cases, which I believe is far superior in helping people. He seemed like a person with great benevolence for humanity.

      An example of his open mindedness is highlighted here from: ''There is no way by which the events of the world can be directly transmitted or recorded in our brains; they are experienced and constructed in a highly subjective way, which is different in every individual to begin with, and differently reinterpreted or reexperienced whenever they are recollected. Our only truth is narrative truth, the stories we tell each other and ourselves—the stories we continually recategorize and refine. Such subjectivity is built into the very nature of memory and follows from its basis and mechanisms in the brains we have.'' (The River of Consciousness)

    2. “slippages and errors of memory that occur in everyday life”

      The unreliability of memory is a subject explored through many of Beckett's unreliable narrators.

  2. Jul 2017
  3. Jun 2016
    1. WHAT DOES IT MATTER WHO IS SPEAKING/' SOMEONE SAID, "WHAT DOES IT MATTER WHO IS SPEAKING": Beckett, Foucault, Barthes Alastair Hir

      Hird, Alastair. 2010. “‘WHAT DOES IT MATTER WHO IS SPEAKING,’ SOMEONE SAID, ‘WHAT DOES IT MATTER WHO IS SPEAKING’: Beckett, Foucault, Barthes.” Samuel Beckett Today / Aujourd’hui 22: 289–99. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25781931.

      Picks up point that Beckett features very strongly in both Barthe's Death of an Author and Foucault's "What is an Author."