6 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
    1. I chose all my scholarly journals, I put them together. I chose some YouTube videos; they were –IF:        Mm-hmm.CF:        – like, a bunch of TED talks.        

      Compiling research materials.

      Is there room for us to think about the iterative process; can we work with instructors to "reward" (or assign) students to alternate the searching, reading and writing.

    2. And – And I seen how – I saw how many, um, scholarly journals or how many sources came up for it, right? Um, number of sources. Right. And then, if I – if I felt like it wasn’t enough for me to thoroughly talk about the topic, I would move on. Right? So, when I did segregation, there – like, I guess, like, my specific topic was modern-day, so there wasn’t really much about it. Right? So, not much info. Right? And then, when I did gentrification, there were a lot, right?

      This part of the process is interesting to me. Links topic selection to search (seemingly a single search).

      It also seems a little misguided. What can we do in our lessons that could make tiny changes to this attitude?

  2. Jul 2015
    1. Mr. Obama has already tapped executives in Silicon Valley companies to help with technology problems in his administration.

      Private sector technologists, while important to work with, would not be good choices IMO, especially considering the need to cut down copyright law and especially considering that libraries often work with the poor and disadvantaged. Considering Silicon Valley's egregious income disparity, I don't think there are many in Silicon Valley who would be appropriate for this position.

      Why is it always that the most notable position in a largely FEMALE profession, has been held exclusively by white men?

    2. If the president accepted that recommendation, his choices might include Anthony W. Marx, president of the New York Public Library; David S. Ferriero, the archivist of the United States; or Sarah Thomas, the librarian at Harvard.

      I like how most of the choices listed in this article are white men. How about someone who actually represents librarianship? Like a woman? Maybe even from a public university, why from Harvard?

    3. Courtney Young

      I think Courtney Young should be the Librarian of Congress