5 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. free of charge and free of licensing restrictions

      Are there any examples currently where something is not free of charge but is free of licensing restrictions?

  2. Feb 2017
    1. the goal posts must be placed further than simply cheaper textbooks.

      Yes. Because publishers will always be able to beat OER on price as they mine new business models. Not hard to image where the content becomes the loss leader for the publishers in order to get faculty buy-in into tools that have the real gold - data.

    2. This begs a broader question: If open educational practices are a game changer, why are OER advocates playing by the rules of the commercial textbook industry?

      This is a wonderful question. In part, I think it is to make it as palatable as possible to bring on board new faculty. If you make it like it old, but slightly different (incremental change) it may be easier for some to come around and on board. The problem with this is then OER no longer become truly innovative - it is reactive to the rules of the textbook industry. And that industry is going away.

  3. Apr 2016
  4. Nov 2015
    1. This article included an estimate from the system that further backs up the $530 – $640 figures. [Hanley’s] rough estimate: As of a few years ago, learners at the 23-campus, 460,200-student university system were spending $300 million a year on course materials — about $651 per student per school year.

      This graph is the kicker. It is NOT about textbook costs, it's about how much students can afford to spend. The amount hasn't changed, or has gone down, since '02!