5 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2016
    1. How does the heart rate monitor work? The Pebble 2 and Time 2 will use optical heart rate monitors that will monitor heart rate constantly during a workout.  When at rest or sleeping, heart rate will be monitored every 10 minutes, ensuring your resting heart rate is monitored with little to no battery life impact. The monitor will have no problem with sweat, but won’t provide heart rate readings when submerged in water. Please note:  Pebble devices with a heart rate (HR) monitor are intended to be a valuable tool that can provide an accurate estimation of the user’s heart rate. Pebble smartwatches are not medical devices and you should not rely on the accuracy of heart rate data for any purpose, especially for medical or health purposes.

      Straight from the horse’s mouth. We now know that heart rate monitoring on the Pebble smartwatches is as infrequent as the Apple Watch. Ah, well… What remains to be known is what “constantly” means, for workouts. Every second, as with Fitbit?

  2. Feb 2016
    1. But as more data is added to the diagram that quantifies the outside world’s impact on his person—the health of the microbial biome in his gut, immediate and long-term environmental conditions, his various epidemiological contexts, and so on—the quality of everything that is “not him” comes to overcode and overwhelm any notion of himself as a withdrawn and self-contained agent. Like Theseus’s Paradox—where after every component of a thing has been replaced, nothing original remains but a metaphysical husk—the User is confronted with the existential lesson that at any point he is only the intersection of many streams.

      [above] "over-individuation and his ultimate pluralization"

  3. Jan 2016
  4. Dec 2015
  5. Aug 2015
    1. Individualism–

      Customisation: the “personal” era. What with “personal learning networks” and everything “self-”. Does sound like a major trend. What’s possibly most interesting, though, is the framing. To some of us, the term “individualism” may carry some negative connotations. It could be fairly neutral, in a context like this one, or deemed positive (prefixed with “rugged”), but it’s an interesting choice, here.