3 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. Due to the time constraintsof intensive online courses, instructional design strategies should be modifiedin order to retain the quality of learning without reducing the quantity of the course content. This paper presents how ablended approach combiningobjectivist and constructivist instructional strategies was used in the designof an intensive summer online course in the context of a support-based online learning environment

      The paper by Sue-Jen Chen reviews a research study where a objectivist-constructivist blended approach was applied to an intensive online course at an educational institution. This approach was adopted to ensure that valuable and quality content was not lost for the learners, but still met the time constraints of the course. The article continues by promoting that the instructor should take lead in facilitating the content, but still providing options to the learner that applies to their motivations, interest and it relevant to their past experiences. A "blended approach" framework is presented that consists of four core components: content, people, technology, and goals/learning tasks. The article concludes by providing detailed examples of how each component would look in a real life example by giving details of the study conducted. (Rating: 10/10)

    1. your assumptions about learners align nicely with a body of thought known as “adult learning theory,” pioneered mainly by Malcolm Knowles beginning in the 1950s. Knowles led community-based education programs and started to notice that the adults in his classes seemed to learn differently than school-age students

      This webpage sponsored by Portland Community College provides a six question "True or False" assessment. After completing, the article states that if you answered True to most of the statements, then the assumptions align with Malcolm's Adult Learning theory. The article reviews in detail on how most adults need to know why they need the information; most learners need to have the ability to incorporate their past experiences in their learning; learners are motivated by different elements and factors; and that all learners are diverse (i.e. ages, learning styles) and efforts should be made to be aware of the difference/similarities. The article concludes by reaffirming that facilitators should be aware of the diversity of the learners using different strategies and make an attempt to become aware of what motivates them. (Rating: 6/10)

    1. This fact sheet reviews three major theories—andragogy, self-directed learning, and transformational learning—and discusses their implications for practice

      The fact sheet provided by TEAL Center reviews three core adult leaning theories, including andragogy, self-directed learning (SDL), and transformational learning. In terms of andragogy, the fact sheet informs that, in contrast to pedaggogy, the learning theory caters to adults by leveraging a set of 5 assumptions. In terms of SDL, this learning theory strives to have learners take the lead in directing their own learning and use their past experience to direct what is important to them. SDL assist user in identifying what goals to accomplish, how to evaluate content, and what to accept and reject. Lastly, transformational learning theory is the learning that the learners have a change of perspective (i.e. about themselves or their environment) after the learning has occurred. (Rating: 10/10)