84 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
  2. Jul 2019
    1. How is “Reading Like a Writer” similar to and/or different from the way(s) you read for other classes?

      Post your reply here!

    1. We

      Again, the student acknowledges the importance of conscious thought.

    2. human

      Student rejects Dillard’s ideas but only after explaining why it is important to reject them.

    3. consequences

      The writer sums up his argument while once again reminding us of the problem with Dillard’s ideas.

    4. choice

      Once again the student demonstrates why the logic of Dillard’s argument falls short when applied to her own writing.

    5. lives

      This is another thoughtful question that makes the reader think along with the writer.

    6. because

      The student brings two ideas together very smoothly here.

    7. memories

      The student asks what seems like a rhetorical question but it is one he will answer in the rest of his essay. It is also a question that forces the reader to think about a key term from the text— “choices.”

    8. victory

      The student makes a historical reference here that serves as strong evidence for his own argument.

    9. consequence

      While the student does not include a personal experience in the essay, this section gives us a sense of his personal view of life.

      Also note how he introduces the term “morals” here to point out the significance of the consequences of our actions. The point is that not only do we need to act but we also need to be aware of the result of our actions.

    10. my comments

      Find Gita DasBender's comments by clicking on the light colored highlights in the essay below.

    11. animal

      This final paragraph sums up the writer's perspective in a thoughtful and mature way. It moves away from Dillard’s argument and establishes the notion of human responsibility, an idea highly worth thinking about.

    12. future

      This question represents excellent critical thinking. The student acknowledges that theoretically “remembering nothing’ may have some merits but then ponders on the larger socio-­political problem it presents.

    13. actions

      This is a strong statement that captures the student’s appreciation of Dillard’s suggestion to live freely but also the ability to recognize why most people cannot live this way. This is a good example of critical thinking.

    14. place

      Student dismantles Dillard’s entire premise by telling us how the very act of writing the essay negates her argument. He has not only interpreted the essay but figured out how its premise is logically flawed.

    15. to

      Even as the writer starts with a general introduction, he makes a claim here that is related to Dillard’s essay.

    16. 210

      Up until this point the student has introduced Dillard’s essay and summarized some of its ideas. In the section that follows, he continues to think critically about Dillard’s ideas and argument.

    17. act

      Student summarizes Dillard’s essay by explaining the ideas of the essay in fresh words.

  3. Apr 2019
    1. Dolores Huerta

      "Dolores Clara Fernández Huerta (born April 10, 1930) is an American labor leader and civil rights activist who, with Cesar Chavez, is a co-founder of the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers (UFW)" (cited from Dolores Huerta - National Women's History Museum).

      https://youtu.be/Unzr9kiFScQ

      https://www.biography.com/news/dolores-huerta-documentary-interview

      https://player.pbs.org/viralplayer/2365053323/

    1. This is the first chapter in the main body of the text. You can change the text, rename the chapter, add new chapters, and add new parts.
    1. tegy for the organization to gain and maintain success. The executives leading the organization can simply create a plan and execute it, and they can be confident that their plan will not be undermined by changes over time. But as the consultant’s experience shows, only a few executives—such as the manager of the Panama Canal—enjoy a stable and predictable situation. Because change affects the strategies of almost all org

      note

  4. Mar 2019
    1. Effective inventory control can be broken down into a few important steps: Set up systems to track and record inventory Develop specifications and procedures for ordering and purchasing Develop standards and procedures to efficiently receive deliveries Determine the frequency and processes for reconciling inventory

      This is impotant!

      https://youtu.be/O3ukHC3fyuc

  5. Feb 2019
    1. Formal tools exist for understanding these relationships, and many of these tools are explained and applied in this book. But formal tools are not enough; creativity is just as important to strategic management. Mastering strategy is therefore part art and part

      This is for the midterm.

  6. Jan 2019
    1. We argue that in culturesthat provide less support, individuals will useautobiographical memory more frequently. Forexample, in a context with low support formaintaining social bonds, individuals may drawmore frequently on autobiographical memory forsocial-bonding purposes.

      not clear as to why at this point...?

    Annotators

    1. CytoarchiteC:ture

      cyto = cell // form follows function // brodmann

    2. The Cell Theory

      Idea that -- All living things are made up of cells.

    3. rodmann's most important tool in mapping the cortex was cytoarchitectonics
    4. One of the more influential localization schemes of this period was phrenology, developed by Gall and Spurzheim in the early 1800s (this movement is well known, so will only be summarized here)
    5. reticular theory.
    6. gap junttion

    7. Electrical synapses
    8. synaptic cleft
    9. chemical synapse,

    10. Dendrites receive incoming signals and carry them to the cell body
    11. Axons carry signals (action potentials) away from the cell body and toward the synapse
    12. A synapse is a junction between two neurons, that is, between the axon terminal of the presynaptic cell and the dendrite (or sometimes, the cell body itself) of the postsynaptic cell.
    13. Basic Neuron Anatomy

    14. Neurons, or nerve cells, consist of three major parts: cell body (soma), axon, and dendrites.
    15. the neuron doctrine
    1. Over the five years to 2018, despite rising external competition from conventional grocery and natural food stores that sell similar items, the industry’s average profit margin has risen amid growing focus on marketing higher-margin premium food products, such as local milk, artisan cheeses, gluten-free baked goods and loose-leaf teas. While competition from other industries is likely to increase significantly over the next few years, efforts by industry operators to minimize labor costs and stock a greater share of higher-margin products will prevent any significant losses. IBISWorld expects profit margins to decline only slightly over the five years to 2023.

      ihdihiefd

    1. The metro area has about 360,000 federal workers, representing 11.5 percent of the region’s full-time work force, according to Stephen Fuller, an economist at George Mason University who focuses on the Washington area. Of that group, about 145,000 have been furloughed, he said. This does not account for the many federal contractors whose pay is dependent on the government and who, unlike those in the Civil Service, do not expect any back pay.
    1. my comments

      Find Gita DasBender's comments by clicking on the light colored highlights in the essay below.

    2. animal

      This final paragraph sums up the writer's perspective in a thoughtful and mature way. It moves away from Dillard’s argument and establishes the notion of human responsibility, an idea highly worth thinking about.

    3. victory

      The student makes a historical reference here that serves as strong evidence for his own argument.

    4. lives

      This is another thoughtful question that makes the reader think along with the writer.

    5. consequences

      The writer sums up his argument while once again reminding us of the problem with Dillard’s ideas.

    6. because

      The student brings two ideas together very smoothly here.

    7. future

      This question represents excellent critical thinking. The student acknowledges that theoretically “remembering nothing’ may have some merits but then ponders on the larger socio-­political problem it presents.

    8. choice

      Once again the student demonstrates why the logic of Dillard’s argument falls short when applied to her own writing.

    9. place

      Student dismantles Dillard’s entire premise by telling us how the very act of writing the essay negates her argument. He has not only interpreted the essay but figured out how its premise is logically flawed.

    10. human

      Student rejects Dillard’s ideas but only after explaining why it is important to reject them.

    11. consequence

      While the student does not include a personal experience in the essay, this section gives us a sense of his personal view of life.

      Also note how he introduces the term “morals” here to point out the significance of the consequences of our actions. The point is that not only do we need to act but we also need to be aware of the result of our actions.

    12. We

      Again, the student acknowledges the importance of conscious thought.

    13. actions

      This is a strong statement that captures the student’s appreciation of Dillard’s suggestion to live freely but also the ability to recognize why most people cannot live this way. This is a good example of critical thinking.

    14. 210

      Up until this point the student has introduced Dillard’s essay and summarized some of its ideas. In the section that follows, he continues to think critically about Dillard’s ideas and argument.

    15. act

      Student summarizes Dillard’s essay by explaining the ideas of the essay in fresh words.

    16. memories

      The student asks what seems like a rhetorical question but it is one he will answer in the rest of his essay. It is also a question that forces the reader to think about a key term from the text— “choices.”

    17. to

      Even as the writer starts with a general introduction, he makes a claim here that is related to Dillard’s essay.

  7. Dec 2018
    1. How is “Reading Like a Writer” similar to and/or different from the way(s) you read for other classes?

      Post your reply below!

  8. Mar 2018
    1. Going all the way back to the Hermann Ebbinghaus “forgetting curve” experiments of the 1880s, we have known -- and replicated in dozens if not hundreds of experiments -- that no matter how serious, responsible and dedicated we professors are to “covering” our “topic,” students retain and apply subsequently only what is meaningful to them. I like to call this “haunted by the 8 percent.” In experiment after experiment, if you test students with basically matched backgrounds (say, from the same educational institution and major) who took a big introductory course on a topic (say, Psychology 101) six months in the past and compare their results with those of other students who never took the course, the differential in test scores is only about 8 percent. Here’s a variation: recently, at one of the nation’s elite private prep schools, students were given, with no warning, the exact same exams one September that they had taken as final exams the previous May. The average grade on finals was about A-minus/B-plus. On the September retests: F.
    2. As professors, we have it drilled into us that testable content is the most important thing we do and that we are not responsible and respectable teachers if we don’t offer full coverage of the topic. We brag about a 25-page syllabus or about “too much reading.” Stop! Everything we know about learning shows us that, when we overassign, we inspire skimming and cheating, not learning.

      CIP_Point 4 (+link)

    3. Because so much of active learning is front-loaded and continual, with feedback being constant and formative, the “finals” (papers, exams, turning in grades) aren’t much different than what one has been doing all term. Because summative exams and papers are anathema in active learning -- because learning is a process, with lots of opportunities to repeat and improve (a friend says all of his active learning classes are “pass/try again”) -- by the end of the term, a student has a full, rich, carefully evaluated portfolio of work. The final should be really just an affirmation or confirmation of a process mastered throughout the term.

      CIP_Point 3 (+link)

    4. Active learning takes lots of scaffolding. You need to take a lot of time thinking deeply and carefully before you then have the right setting where students can take the lead. You must know not just the content but also how to design challenging readings, learning experiments, maker exercises, interactive experiments -- all kinds of ways that students can step in and take responsibility for the course. Will they be designing the syllabus? Some of it or all? Will they be contributing to assessment and helping to determine standards for the course? Will they be publishing their work on a public website? Each of those takes serious planning and design before the course begins.

      CIP_Point 2 (+link)

    5. Active learning means shifting some of the leadership of the course to the students and creating a situation where they will be responsible, in a significant measure, for their own learning.

      CIP_Point 1 (+link)

  9. Jan 2018
    1. The origins of America’s separate juvenile justice system go back to 1899, when the state of Illinois created the first juvenile courts in Cook County, which includes Chicago. That first system had a special juvenile court and associated clinics staffed with experts in social services. Compared to traditional adult courts, that juvenile court was informal. Focusing on rehabilitating minors, it operated under the philosophy of parens patriae, which means the state playing the role of parent. That principle gave Illinois’s court the power to intervene in the lives of any juvenile under the age of sixteen who committed delinquent or criminal acts or was thought to be in need of state help. Since then, parens patriae has been the cornerstone of the juvenile justice system in the United States.

      yes

    1. Since the turn of the twentieth century, one of the most significant developments in the American justice system has been a trend away from treating juvenile offenders in the adult justice system by developing a largely autonomous system of justice designed for the special needs of adolescents.The origins of America’s separate juvenile justice system go back to 1899, when the state of Illinois created the first juvenile courts in Cook County, which includes Chicago. That first system had a special juvenile court and associated clinics staffed with experts in social services. Compared to traditional adult courts, that juvenile court was informal. Focusing on rehabilitating minors, it operated under the philosophy of parens patriae, which means the state playing the role of parent. That principle gave Illinois’s court the power to intervene in the lives of any juvenile under the age of sixteen who committed delinquent or criminal acts or was thought to be in need of state help. Since then, parens patriae has been the cornerstone of the juvenile justice system in the United States.

      test

  10. Nov 2017
    1. Gaining the students' attention and establishing expectations. Reviewing relevant, previously-learned material. Presenting the new information by linking it to previous learning. Providing learning guidance or elaboration. Providing time for practice and feedback. Providing for spaced practice to enhance retention.

      These six items are key to "mastering the art of teaching."

    1. NTRODUCTIONt has long been known that the advancement of Thailanguage processing technology is mainly delayed,comparing to many other languages.

      test!

    1. The comments above, one from an international teaching assistant (ITA) in chemistry from Russia and the other from an ITA in computer science from China, indicate the kinds of challenges that ITAs face on a daily basis in the U.S. classroom

      Great point! You can also read about this in your textbook, Chapter 3.

  11. hypothesis-h5p.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com hypothesis-h5p.s3.us-east-2.amazonaws.com
    1. <iframe allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" frameborder="0" height="214" src="https://h5p.org/h5p/embed/138441" width="1090"></iframe><script charset="UTF-8" src="https://h5p.org/sites/all/modules/h5p/library/js/h5p-resizer.js"></script>