2 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2020
    1. I can’t do without Gabriel Betteredge

      This is such a strong remark, and I assume that it’s intentional and purposeful as we learn more about Betteredge’s role (beyond his butler role?) in this story. On another note, this also brings up the social norms in the Victorian era, especially the power dynamic between servants and their employers.

  2. Mar 2018
    1. I'm jealous of you

      Celie talks to Sophia about their difference in handling their husbands. Celie is obedient and oppressed, while Sophia is rebellious and oppressed. The way it sounds to me, is that Sophia was also subjected to sexual abuse, but she stood up for herself and didn't allow the men to take her power from her. Sophia, it seems, not to be afraid of killing someone or of death itself. While Celie has been forced to live after all of her babies got killed or thought to be killed. I don't believe Sophia has every been pregnant, therefore she still feels powerful. Does power come with not having children? You don't need to nurture a child and you can focus on yourself when you don't have a child. Shug Avery never had kids (or nurtured them for that matter) and she rose to fame and fortune