7 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2018
    1. Then shining Heav'nly fair, a Goddess arm'd Out of thy head I sprung; amazement seis'd All th' Host of Heav'n back they recoild affraid At first, and call'd me Sin, and for a Sign

      This is odd, because it resembles Athena fully armed springing out of Zeus' head when he swallowed Metis, for fear that she would give birth to a child that would supplant him. Athena was the highly respected goddess of women who unfortunately strongly favored males over females, and claimed she had no mother, even though Metis was her actual mother. Sin here has no mother - she is born only of Satan. What isn't clear here is why Milton turns the Athena myth on its head (so to speak!) by substituting SIN for the goddess of wisdom.

  2. Jul 2018
  3. Jan 2018
  4. Nov 2017
  5. Sep 2017
    1. history

      Like a true oral historian, Arachne refuses to weave narratives as told by the gods [accept the dominant narrative]. Through her political praxis i.e. weaving, she resurrected a narrative that remained below the radar and thus told a story which seems to have destabilized normative criterion of knowability and that infuriated Athena.

      Here's a great oral history interview sequence: http://oralhistorykosovo.org/hava-shala-interview-sequence/

  6. Feb 2014
    1. But when the messengers came to Delphi, the Pythian priestess would not answer them before they restored the temple of Athena at Assesos in the Milesian territory,

      1.19. The Pythia refuses to answer the question about the illness until the Lydians rebuild the temple of Athena at Assesos.