8 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. Generally, CSS selectors refer to markup or, in some cases, to element properties as set with scripting (client-side JavaScript), rather than user actions. For example, :empty matches element with empty content in markup; all input elements are unavoidably empty in this sense. The selector [value=""] tests whether the element has the value attribute in markup and has the empty string as its value. And :checked and :indeterminate are similar things. They are not affected by actual user input.
    2. The selector [value=""] tests whether the element has the value attribute in markup and has the empty string as its value.
  2. Sep 2020
    1. This sibling combinator is similar to X + Y, however, it's less strict. While an adjacent selector (ul + p) will only select the first element that is immediately preceded by the former selector, this one is more generalized. It will select, referring to our example above, any p elements, as long as they follow a ul.
  3. Nov 2019
  4. Aug 2019
    1. CSS syntax is awesome for two reasons: It is an order of magnitude faster and less resource intensive than the more complex XPath. When what you want to find can be found with a css selector, a corresponding XPath query doing the same would most of the time be much longer and harder to read.
  5. Jan 2017
  6. Apr 2016
    1. Interestingly, it uses multiple methods to locate the annotation within the cited page: absolute character count, text to search for, and XPath notation.

      That's done to accommodate sites who's DOM changes either over time or during user interaction (single page apps, etc).

      This blog post explains the current approach and thinking behind it in Hypothes.is: https://hypothes.is/blog/fuzzy-anchoring/