35 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2018
    1. not prepared to address the intersections of healing, politics, and emotion in classrooms.

      This seems like an overseen dimension of teacher prep, right? As if teaching can occur in a vacuum and emotions need not be addressed or recognized in the classroom, let alone be brought in explicitly and handled with sensitivity.

    1. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut. Sitting on a worn gray couch with earplugs in, trying to block out the sounds of sheering metal from the construction site right under my window as I translate stories from Arabic to English for the Damascus Bureau, an under-project of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting.

      the writer lures the reader in even further with a surprising turn of events, and creates an interesting contrast of environments to differentiate the translator’s life from that of the Syrian women affected by the war

    2. I have fled Aleppo from the increased fanaticism of the rebels, I have fled Aleppo from the chokehold of the regime, I have fled Aleppo to Turkey, I have fled Aleppo to Lebanon, I have fled Aleppo not knowing if I will ever return, or what I might find if I do.

      the use of repetition portrays the significance of this city to the writer and reveals her constant attempt at survival despite her clear attachment to her beloved home

    3. Lina Mounzer

      Thank you for this piece. For its power and beauty and insights and experience.

    4. Language gives the individual the power and strength of the collective. And writing, speaking, telling stories—wielding language in narrative form—has the ability to transform the collective through the individual experience.

      This is the center of the whole piece, to me.

    5. Who is the reader I’m addressing

      We are the readers ...

    6. there is no real resolution to the trauma of the collective. It lives on in all the stories you will ever tell from now on, in all the stories that will be passed down along the line of culture, even when they are about something else.

      Interesting insights ... writing about many lingers longer than writing about one person.

    7. Trying to rewrite my past in an effort to not have to translate it.

      The writer pivots here, to self.

    8. these I’s bump up into one another again and again until they are accidentally shattered, the various pieces of these commingled selves becoming, for long moments, indistinguishable from one another.

      (found poem from text)

      from you

      comes I

      for I have

      become you;

      these words

      now of us

      co-mingle,

      indistinguishable

      in these long moments

      where we both emerge

      accidentally shattered

      by story.

    9. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut. Sitting on a worn gray couch with earplugs in, trying to block out the sounds of sheering metal from the construction site right under my window as I translate stories from Arabic to English for the Damascus Bureau, an under-project of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting.

      This is the MOST AMAZING PLOT TWIST i have read in months! I loved how she made me believe that it was all her witnessing these awful scenes in reality by herself, Then stating the fact that she read about these situation & imagined them as if she has really lived in them scene by scene.

  2. Sep 2018
    1. Fear is something you get used to, it becomes the new baseline from which your body operates

      I agree to that as I was in a situation where i was in constant fear for more then a year. Yet, i believe she needed to add the fact that constant fear breaks one's stability. It's bad.

    2. For the last few nights I have been glued to the news, unable to turn it off

      most of us Egyptians can totally relate to that.. 25th of January 2011..

    3. Our daughter did not die because of a bullet or mortar shell or carbomb, like my father, sister, brother, cousin, mother, neighbor, pharmacist, teacher

      again, this is very catchy and touching. Listing all the deaths must be very hard for her

    4. range in age from their teens to their sixties and seventies

      Interesting to have different perspectives from different ages to see how diverse the struggle was among all ages.

    5. where her perfect blue body lay among countless others they had not yet found place enough to bury.

      the contradicting words "perfect" and "blue" burry a lot of pain. Besides not having a place to be buried is so unfair.

    6. When I tell you how my nine-year-old cousin was martyred his first day fighting on the frontlines, do you think us monstrous to have let him go, or must I add a note to explain how we have come to accept that in war the desire to fight and its attendant risk of death is something that doesn’t respect childhood?

      Its just so evident that shes writing this article straight from the heart and integrates the reader quite often with her way of writing, an emotional one I would say. She plays a lot on the emotional side of the reader which is good.

    7. A barrel will no longer ever be a barrel again; shrapnel will always explode from it. The word mustard will forevermore carry a whiff of gas, rashing your skin, smarting your eyes. When you say Sabra, or Shatila, you are not referring to a place, but to a heap of dead bodies shot indiscriminately and tossed aside like worn rags

      Things that we are exposed to in our daily lives change us in some way, and this is a perfect example of how her vocabulary changes, and how her way of thinking changes for words and her vision in general. We are always exposed to such changes that affect us in good ways, that not all the time, we notice.

    8. Translation is not just about transposing words from one language to another. But transplanting a feeling, a way of seeing the world, from one vocabulary of experience to another. I think of the verb, to transplant. A seedling from soil to soil. But also an organ from body to body. The procedure must be as delicate, as cognizant of the original conditions of creation in order to nurture and ensure a continuation of life.

      Here she provides a vital piece of information that makes the reader understand how passionate she is about translation. She beautifully defines, in her own words, what translation is.

    9. To translate a text is to enter into the most intimate relationship with it possible.

      To read such a text too, i got the same feeling.

    10. In Arabic, the root of the verb, to witness, is sh-h-d. Roots are important in Arabic. They are present, that is, known and recognizable, not obscure etymologies but immediate and close, giving life directly to all the words that bud and branch from them.

      Very true piece of info to provide for people that arent familiar with the arabic language.

    11. Translated literally, the subject is the doer, the verb is the doing, the object the one it is done to. In English, a writer writes a book; a letter. In Arabic, al-katib yaktubu kitab; maktoob. All from the root k-t-b, to write.

      Too powerful!!!

    12. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut. Sitting on a worn gray couch with earplugs in, trying to block out the sounds of sheering metal from the construction site right under my window as I translate stories from Arabic to English for the Damascus Bureau, an under-project of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting.

      Great twist! She grabbed my attention by how sad it starts with the article and makes me feel in some way upset about her situation and then just tells us that she's just listening and translating this! Amazing!

    13. My body vibrating, whether to the shattering of an earth drill or to the tension of what I read, I have witnessed them march in the streets calling for change, bury loved ones, resuscitate strangers, defy soldiers and snipers, wait in breadlines, pack their whole lives into vans and cars, undergo daily humiliation at checkpoints on their way to and from work, to and from university, which they have refused to leave or discontinue.

      The way that she had expressed and described such words was touching.

    14. I have buried seven husbands, three fiancés, fifteen sons and a two-week old daughter

      this is atrocious, no one should be put in such situation

    15. I have been threatened, beaten, strip-searched, thrown in prison, tortured and made to watch as my mother knelt weeping at the dirty feet of tribal leaders to beg for any information about my kidnapped father. I have waited at countless checkpoints, praying that no one finds the bread, the money, the schoolbooks, the chocolates I have hidden in my bag, on my body, trying to smuggle them through to people on the other side.

      This beginning of the article is very catchy, we do not understand where she is, why she is in this situation and it makes me want to understand what's happening to her by reading the article.

    16. And two contradictory things become true at once: that despite the fact I am attempting to reproduce her words as faithfully as I can, they must now re-emerge in words unavoidably my own.

      Here is the contradiction of the translator, I suppose.

    17. they are constantly traversing borders both visible and invisible

    18. Fear is something you get used to

      I am just shocked. All of us must have experienced fear in different ways. The fear of losing someone we love, the fear of failing in anything we do, but none of us thought that this is a feeling we can get used to.

    19. But the new words were strangely light.

      I wonder how hard not being able to translate the suffer in non-native language with other words which does not have the same power.

    20. the battle has been won in our favor. The enemy has been driven out of our town. The town council invites us back to reclaim our homes. Immediately I pile into a bus with my mother and sisters for the long journey back to our village, singing and ululating all the way. All I can think of is my journal, with all the poems I have written over the years. Left behind in the rush to leave, I have mourned it every day since, cursing myself for forgetting it. We climb the hill together, a key buried in my mother’s pocket, that never once left my mother’s pocket, flying the last half kilometer over jagged rocks and dried clumps of earth that were once orchards and fields. I see my mother pull out the key, ready to open the door, only to find a pile of rubble where our house once was.

      It is so heartbreaking when some people are finally achieving their dream of returning back home, their hopes die at the scene of destruction of their houses, memories, and their favorite objects.

    21. All this I have watched from my living room in Beirut

      Wait.

      So the stories above are not her stories ... she is translating and then writing of their experiences. Ok. Some sort of formatting should have made that more obvious to the reader. (Is that just me who feels this way?)

      I get this was a literary approach, and now I see the rest of the piece unfolds from a writer as translator, affected by the stories of the women bloggers.

      I think what I mean is, by annotating as I was reading, I felt as if I were with her -- now, a composite her -- speaking to her in the margins (along with all of you) -- and realizing the writer was removed, and only telling the stories of others, makes me want to go back and edit my remarks. I won't.

      But I never had that feeling before with annotation activities.

      Interesting ....

      Reading on ....

    22. Fatma

      I looked up the meaning of the name. Fatma. From this site:

      ... a girls' name is of Arabic derivation, and the meaning of the name Fatma is "baby's nurse". Fatma is a variant form of Fatima (Arabic): also possibly "one who abstains".

      I am thinking of that second meaning -- "one who abstains" -- and thinking of war and the powerless nature of those caught up in the war. Abstain from the chaos was not a choice Fatma or her mother (the writer) or the father had here.

    23. where our house once was

      I can't even imagine how it would feel like when your home, memories, experiences, and everything that make up what you really are as a person gets completely destroyed, and you can do nothing about it....it's not just a house that was buried underground, part of you was buried along with the house.

    24. I have waited at countless checkpoints, praying that no one finds the bread, the money, the schoolbooks, the chocolates I have hidden in my bag, on my body, trying to smuggle them through to people on the other side.

      This really triggers me because it doesn't usually occur to us that the things we consider very basic and don't give such great value, some people fight to get them; they fight to have normal lives.

    1. When we encourage students to use technology, do we remind them of the risks of placing their information online and give them choices of how much personal information to reveal? Do our students recognize the ways in which Facebook’s privacy settings continually shift without user permission, and what posting a photo today might mean for their future employment opportunities? Do students recognize the importance of password-protecting their devices and having different passwords across platforms?

      I totally agree with that, because putting into consideration the privacy & security issues really matter! And also about the citation or taking the permission process also matters because no one has the right to have all of the information that he got from outside sources to tell that these were his.