25 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2016
    1. It was clear to me that this folk tale genre had provided the class with a concise structure and enjoyable motivation for their pieces

      By giving students different examples of something you expect them to do, it will help get their minds moving and them thinking towards what they need to do.

    2. Students who were more advanced in language development were often on target with the moral Aesop had intended.

      After reading different Aesop fables, the morals for some of them were easy to figure out. For some of the other fables, they were not as easy. I think its great that students can figure out a moral to a fable without a teacher telling the students what it is.

    3. the original fables and a modern version. That way, the students would have a broader view of the genre.

      I think that when teachers use different views of something, it defiantly does help students have a broader view on something. I think that this is a great thing to do through fables.

    1. What if the shepherd boy actually saw the wolf each time he cried for help? What if the wolf was cunning and hid from the villagers? When we ask these questions, the meaning of the fable changes drastically. It is no longer a fable about the importance of honesty. Instead, it is a fable about the villagers unjustly accusing the shepherd boy of dishonesty. It is a fable about the dangers of jumping to conclusions without knowledge of all the facts.

      I think this is a interesting point. Normally we learn the moral of the story is to not be dishonest but this time the moral is to not jump to conclusions.

    2. As we all know, young children are most comfortable with clear rules and "black and white" thinking.

      I believe that it is the opposite. While it may be true that older children enjoy the "black and white" thinking it is only because they have grown up being taught that there is a right and a wrong answer. Young children enjoy being creative and they learn by using their imagination, that is why almost every preschool classroom has a dramatic play area for the children to use their imagination.

  2. Apr 2016
    1. Be prepared for a great discussion as you reread those sections of the story that open the door to the "what if" questions. Provoking the children to think critically via "what if" questions can be applied to any of Aesop's fables. Older children can even be asked to offer their own "what if" questions. The discussions will be fun and lively. Don’t forget to conclude with a discussion on "it depends."

      Children love to ask "why." This type of lesson allows them to do just that as they exercise their ability to think of things in new ways. It also provides them with a lesson about why some things can not be fully explained because "it depends."

    2. What if the shepherd boy actually saw the wolf each time he cried for help? What if the wolf was cunning and hid from the villagers? When we ask these questions, the meaning of the fable changes drastically. It is no longer a fable about the importance of honesty. Instead, it is a fable about the villagers unjustly accusing the shepherd boy of dishonesty. It is a fable about the dangers of jumping to conclusions without knowledge of all the facts.

      Thinking about this fable in a different way gives it a whole new meaning. I think having students think about how the lesson in a fable can be different if one aspect of the story is changed is a great way to help them begin to think critically.

    3. Introducing the concept is as simple as asking a question that causes the child to view the story from another perspective. It is imperative, however, that the child fully understands the message of the fable as presented from the original point of view.

      I like the idea of using fables as a way to introduce critical thinking to children because this type of genre requires students to apply something that happened to animals to a real life situation in order to understand it. Using a type of genre that students are familiar with is a great way to do this.

    4. As we all know, young children are most comfortable with clear rules and "black and white" thinking

      I disagree with this. If anything, younger students are more open to abstract thinking and putting their own creativity on things.

    5. It is a fundamental skill that is of such importance that many colleges and universities require their freshman students to complete an introductory course. The Common Core Standards also recognize the value of critical thinking, declaring it as one of the explicit skills children are to learn.

      I thought that it was very interesting that critical thinking is seen as an "explicit skill" that students should learn, yet many students have not mastered this skill which is why colleges require freshman to take a course on the subject. As a future teacher I will keep this fact in mind when I teach critical thinking to my students. Although this is a complex skill, I do believe that students can grasp the idea if it is taught in the right way.

    6. "What if" questions force an analysis and evaluation from a completely different point of view.

      I never really thought about how something so simple as asking someone "what if?" forces them to look at the situation from a new perspective. It is true though, because asking "what if" means looking at what we know actually happens and applying it to a made up scenario.

    7. "The Boy Who Cried Wolf" is one of the most well known of Aesop's fables. Children can easily relate to the shepherd boy who is bored and is looking for attention

      This is definitely a good example of a fable because it is something that can be directly related to the child's life. In a sense, the student can see themselves as the boy and see what they would do in his situation. If they would choose to act as the boy does, then they can see the repercussions.

    8. Introducing the concept is as simple as asking a question that causes the child to view the story from another perspective.

      We do this a lot in the 1st grade classroom I am placed in, every time we read a story we ask the students, "how do you think this character feels?" I like to ask the students to explain how they know that the character is feeling certain way because it allows me to gauge how well the student can read other people.

    9. they present a typical problem that children readily understand and can relate to. One or more characters, often animals, resolve the problem, thereby presenting the evaluation and analysis from a singular point of view

      It is interesting that fables seem to be so basic in structure, but carry such great meaning in our society. For example, The Tortoise and the Hare is a fable that teaches children to take their time with things and not to rush, and it something that is read to most (if not all) kids, but it really is so basic.

    10. As we all know, young children are most comfortable with clear rules and "black and white" thinking. The idea that a situation may have multiple answers that depend upon variables and context is a foreign and complex notion to children (and even many adults). Critical thinking begins with the recognition that there are multiple points of view

      As we know, the younger children are the more egocentric they are. Im not sure if this is the correct term, but I mean this in the sense that they only see the world from their own points of view. As children grow older, they become more aware of the idea that other people have different points of view.

    11. I am however, suggesting that children must first understand the concept of "it depends" and how it relates to their daily lives, if they are to think critically.

      This is very true. In order to make informed decisions, people much be able to weigh the pros and cons and see how it fits into the scheme of things. This is much easier to do when a person has an idea of how something would apply to their own lives.

    12. It is no longer a fable about the importance of honesty. Instead, it is a fable about the villagers unjustly accusing the shepherd boy of dishonesty

      This is a very good point. I would have ever thought about it this way, that the villagers just jump to the conclusion that boy was lying.

    13. Aesop's fables are timeless treasures that have been taught to children for many centuries.

      I think this is true because of how great not only the stories are, but the lessons that they teach are. The lessons themselves are timeless.

    14. That is because fables are allegorical stories that teach lessons about life.

      Fables are great ways of teaching life lessons to kids! The stories always result in learning a new lesson

    15. that children must first understand the concept of "it depends"

      I think that "the unknown" or "it depends" answer needs to not be "scary" to students. There are many times when learning you might not know what the answer is. The journey to get to an answer should be a learning process not a destination.

    16. How will children learn critical thinking? The answer is: "It depends."

      I agree with the ambiguity of this statement. Every child is different and will get something unique out of lessons regardless of how "black" or "white" the topic is. Elementary school teachers have to be careful of the materials that they use to teach as critical thinking as children need to be encouraged to think critically rather than learn to take a text and not think about it.

    17. As you know, there are many adaptations of "The Boy Who Cried Wolf."

      It is important to make this known to your class, and show the different ways that authors approach a fable Cinderella is also a grate fable to show the different adaptations and discuss how authors perceive each tale.

    18. In this way, fables provide the framework in which the concept of "it depends" can be introduced to young children

      I completely agree with this statement. I think using fables is an excellent way to help students gain perspective taking skills, reasoning skills, and problem-solving skills. Often times, answers are not cut-and-dry, and it is important that students understand this from a young age. One must think through their problems to resolve them productively and effectively. And if the problem remains unresolved after implementing a solution, the failed attempt can only help the child's understanding of the situation grow.

    19. Critical thinking is the evaluation and analysis of the differing points of view for the purpose of determining which one is "more valid."

      I think this is a very important notion to introduce to young children during mini lessons that require group participation.For example, if a teacher is doing a read aloud and frequently stops to ask her/his students questions relating to information in the book to confirm their understanding of the material, it is important for the students to additionally understand that while everyone's thoughts and answers are valued, we are collectively trying to determine which answer works best for the question concerning the story.

  3. Sep 2013
    1. Fables are suitable for popular addresses; and they have this advantage, that they are comparatively easy to invent, whereas it is hard to find parallels among actual past events.

      We like stories, they engage us.