166 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. Container and Packaging Recycling Law

      Japan has more laws that have to do with recycling different materials.

    1. The newest hotspots for handling US plastic recycling are some of the world’s poorest countries, including Bangladesh, Laos, Ethiopia and Senegal, offering cheap labor and limited environmental regulation.

      As the United States sends our recyclables to other countries to handle our overflow, Cheap labor is used.

    1. The value of plastic, glass and aluminum has decreased, forcing many redemption centers to shut their doors, despite a state subsidy program designed to help them weather market downturns.

      Here are some of the challenges the Bay Area are facing due to lack of funding.

    1. I'm so glad you shared this and I'm so, so, so glad that you're doing okay. I'm sure it's strange to read it - but I was worried about you. I'm sure a lot of us nameless, faceless people out here were.I cried reading this. I've been there. I'll probably be there again. Thank you for being brave enough to share more of your journey with us.

      I noticed a connection between this blog and the Jonny Sun piece. Both people created something and then put it out there on the internet. They both developed a virtual participatory culture communities from the art that was created.

    1. And in these dangerous and unsure times, in the midst of it all, I think the thing that we have to hold on to is other people. And I know that is a small thing made up of small moments, but I think it is one tiny, tiny sliver of light in all the darkness. 

      Sometimes a little acknowledgement is all that is needed to be able to ground yourself and to step back from the end to a new beginning.

    2. t can feel like you are writing in this personal, intimate diary that's completely private, yet at the same time you want everyone in the world to read it. And I think part of that, the joy of that is that we get to experience things from perspectives from people who are completely different from ourselves, and sometimes that's a nice thing. 

      I have had this feeling before

    1. “For us, it slows things down. We try to integrate people back to humanity,” Mr. McAleer said. “If isolation and shame is the driver for people joining these types of groups, doxxing certainly isn’t the answer.”

      There's probably a commentary here about incel groups too but I just cant think of it.

    2. Now the online hunt to reveal extremists has raised concerns about unintended consequences, or even collateral damage. A few individuals have been misidentified in recent weeks, including a professor from Arkansas who was wrongly accused of participating in the neo-Nazi march.

      This in particular reminds me of the Boston Bombing, and how reddit users took it among themselves to find out who did it and instead doxxed the wrong person, who eventually ended up killing himself I believe since the false accusation. Everyone think in these scenarios they're doing it for the cause, and that they're in the right, until someone uninvolved gets accused and ruins their lives. I do think it's tricky though because I do think for like, the people going to Nazi rallies and promoting hateful and toxic content need to recognize there are probably consequences for creating hostility, but where is that line drawn?

    3. But doxxing has emerged from subculture websites like 4Chan and Reddit to become something of a mainstream phenomenon since a white supremacist march on Charlottesville,

      I know it says that it's been happening for a while, but doxxing has been a huge part of toxic internet culture for the last 12+ years. Definitely longer than the march in Charlottesville, anyways.

    4. The next year, doxxing became a tool by in the “GamerGate” controversy, an online dispute purportedly about ethics in video game journalism that became a foundational moment for some of today’s fringe far right. Mostly male video-game players began to publish personal information — including home address and phone numbers — for women in their community, typically journalists and game designers who they said were unfairly politicizing gaming culture.

      Posting someone's information is unbelievable. It's unbelievable someone would do that. Those people should be held liable for their actions. Just because someone had an opinion about gaming culture, doesn't mean someone should attack them and exploit the person's information online. Everyone has a right to their opinion, and doxing is not a good way to get your point across.

    5. This article looks at the consequences of doxxing and how it's become a mainstream answer to exposing white supremacists. It supports both pros and cons of "outing" by using quotes from counter-protestors to a Nazi march in San Francisco and a Nazi reformer. There are references to a Charlottesville, VA march, mistaken identity with doxxing, the death of Cecil the lion, and the mob mentality behind doxxing.

    6. It is not as though they are hiding their identities.

      Does this mean when I am out supporting a Black Lives Matter event, that someone who doesn't agree with me, can doxx me? It is not I appreciate your transparent.

    7. Now the online hunt to reveal extremists has raised concerns about unintended consequences, or even collateral damage. A few individuals have been misidentified in recent weeks, including a professor from Arkansas who was wrongly accused of participating in the neo-Nazi march.

      People who are doxxed could be good or bad people, but it doesn't justify its the right thing to do.

    8. The next year, doxxing became a tool by in the “GamerGate” controversy, an online dispute purportedly about ethics in video game journalism that became a foundational moment for some of today’s fringe far right. Mostly male video-game players began to publish personal information — including home address and phone numbers — for women in their community, typically journalists and game designers who they said were unfairly politicizing gaming culture.

      I saw a play about game gate, really well done and really illustrated the personal impacts of being "doxx"'d. Reflecting back on that story, doxx'ing seems like it might be a poor way to actually influence someone's thinking or behavior.

    9. But the two young men pictured were not the bombers. At one point, Reddit sleuths even set their sights on a student from Brown University, about 60 miles away in Providence, R.I., who was missing. He had nothing to do with the bombing; he had committed suicide.

      I think it's really important to note that people can really interfere with police investigations and cause chaos in the lives of the people they point the finger at.

    10. “People went berserk,” Ms. Coleman said. “That, to me, was this interesting turning point where it showed the general public would be willing to jump into the fray.”

      I think when people are angry, that makes them willing to commit more extreme acts than they might otherwise not do.

    11. White supremacists marched with torches during a rally in Charlottesville, Va.Credit...Edu Bayer for The New York Times

      Fire has historically been used in battle, and as a fear tactic. Take the Great Fire of London in 1666, which destroyed thousands upon thousands of homes, churches, and businesses. While that fire may have been an accident, it's a testament to the destructive power of fire.

      There are many things, passive and active, that white supremacists could accomplish with such tiki torches, including burning people of color in direct combat. Considering the nature of white supremacy, I'm surprised I have not seen such accounts of violence on the news.

    12. SAN FRANCISCO — Riding a motorized pony and strumming a cigar box ukulele, Dana Cory led a singalong to the tune of “If you’re happy and you know it clap your hands.”“You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault,” she sang. “You were spotted in a mob, now you lost your freaking job. You’re a Nazi and you’re fired, it’s your fault.”“All together now!” Ms. Cory, 48, shouted to a cheering crowd in San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood on Saturday. They were protesting a rally planned by far-right organizers about a mile away.“Dox a Nazi all day, every day,” she said.

      Well, that's a heck of a way to start off an article.

      Honestly, there's a certain sort of camaraderie within protests. Not all of them are jovial, as what seems to be going on here, but by their nature, they're very passionate. At the BLM protest in Walnut Creek I attended, we were blowing out our lungs chanting in support of the fallen, and I ended up getting swept away on a wave of justified anger by the time we flooded onto the freeway. A large source of anger amongst the protestors is that the cops overseeing the protests, for the most part, covered their badge numbers and other identifying teachers, meaning that by the time tear gas and rubber bullets were on the table, there was no enemy more specific than the Walnut Creek Police Department. You can't exactly doxx a whole police department and expect it to have as severe of a consequence as if the individual police officers were prosecuted individually.

      P.S.: I note the bias in my annotation, but the difficulty in diffuse consequences stands.

    1. he problem, of course, was that she was telling a story about two people who had no idea they’d been cast as leads in a riveting story for thousands of strangers.

      This kind of reminds me about the movie Jim Carey did called "The Truman Show" and it's disturbing to know that it's still happening, years later, as if we didn't learn anything from it

    2. In the case of that woman from Blair’s flight, her legions of “fans” are digging day and night to find more information, to meet the female lead of this summer’s hottest rom-com. They want to know what happens next. They want to make her finish the story. Go on a date; now kiss; now get engaged; tell us what it was like. We need to know more. More. More.

      In many ways that is one of the most unfortunate things about the "commercialization of the internet", social media, reality television, etc. it's the whole idea of pleasure versus enjoyment. When we aren't working for anything and just passively letting it come to us, we discard it as soon as it's "used up"

    3. Seemingly innocent cases, like that of “Plane Bae,” are small warning signs on the road to our even more networked future. We are all watching each other, mining each other’s lives for “content” that we give for free to large corporations who then monetize it. “Plane Bae” didn’t just benefit Twitter, a company badly in need of good PR, but also T-Mobile, whose savvy CEO swooped in to offer Blair a reimbursement on the Wi-Fi she purchased to write her thread.

      That's the really tragic part is that people are selling other people's lives so they can get "internet famous" for just a moment. Not for doing anything meaningful with their lives, simply by harvesting private moments of other people.

    4. The problem, of course, was that she was telling a story about two people who had no idea they’d been cast as leads in a riveting story for thousands of strangers.

      If you don't take precautions in protecting people's identity, then you can inadvertently turn them into celebrities. This is not fair to the people involved.

    5. It was, after all, the digital equivalent of must-see TV. “Have not been this riveted since the final episode of Lost, and this *didn’t* piss me off! Amazing!” wrote one Twitter user in reply to Blair’s thread. “Please @TheEllenShow have a look on it! We need to know more about this happy end,” wrote another. Blair should be credited, if nothing else, with spinning the relatively unremarkable behavior of two strangers into such a simple but compelling story.

      This is a remarkable insight. While I can definitely empathize with the entertainment value of such a livestream type of entertainment, having watched people make fools of themselves online or play video games, the involuntary aspect of it is unsettling. Saying that these happenings didn't piss them off means that the Twitter user came in with an expectation that this unfolding story should be consumable and intriguing while not breaking off or taking a drastic turn for the worse, as many "first-date" type scenarios do. And I wouldn't even consider this a real first date! Then again, I'm not one to speak for the duo involved.

    6. This is the Faustian alchemy of social media: we are all given the opportunity to become celebrities in an instant, sometimes for nonsensical reasons, with or without our input. But we gain virtually none of the benefits of that fame, none of the glamor or the institutional support to help deal with the invasiveness of celebrity and how it can eat away at every boundary you ever took for granted.

      We don't get to control our own coverage online. Sure, with lawyers and copyright strikes, you can control the spread to the extent, but without an overruling power, such as in the Democratic Peoples' Republic of Korea (AKA: North Korea), people are free to access, interpret, and share information mostly at their own discretion. This is a great thing in the context of freedom, but this also can lead the the spread of misinformation, confusion, and untoward feelings.

    1. Experts say that we would need to implement changes across the board. Legislators may need to pass laws requiring manufacturers to use more recyclable materials, companies would need to build much-needed recycling infrastructure and people would need to recycle properly.

      More changes need to be made to help ensure recycling is done properly. More funding is needed to assist in this process.

    1. Given the immense harm inflicted on individuals and groups of color via prejudice and discrimination, it becomes imperative for our nation to begin the process of disarming, disrupting, and dismantling the constant onslaught of micro- and macroaggressions.

      A

    2. n the United States, the omnipresence of racial bias and bigotry has led many to question the reasons for their persistence in light of widespread public condemnation. Social scientists have proposed a number of reasons for people’s failure to act: (a) the invisibility of modern forms of bias, (b) trivializing an incident as innocuous, (c) diffusion of responsibility, (d) fear of repercussions or retaliation, and (e) the paralysis of not knowing what to do (Goodman, 2011; Kawakami, Dunn, Karmali, & Dovidio, 2009; Latané & Darley, 1968; Scully & Rowe, 2009; Shelton, Richeson, Salvtore, & Hill, 2006; Sue, 2003).

      Supports my question

    1. I have received numerous texts and emails from white friends recently — checking in, asking whether I’m okay. I appreciate the concern, and I want everyone to know I’m fine. Well, I’m as fine as I’ve been since 1982. That’s when, after my family moved to a new neighborhood in Chicago, a group of white kids tried to blow up our car by sticking a rag in the gas tank and lighting it on fire.

      This reminds me of the ending of Invisible Man and I Am Not Your Negro.

    2. Of course, white people, like everyone else, face genuine hardships, but these hardships do not negate white privilege. Consider the difference in responses to the suffering of black people during the crack cocaine epidemic and that of rural whites during the opioid epidemic. O

      Good example of similar stories with vastly different consequences

    3. This will not be easy. The price of justice — the loss of privilege — will be a painful shock.

      Straight forward and true.

    4. As Frederick Douglass said, without struggle, there is no progress. Let’s struggle together for our collective soul.

      Welcoming conclusion.

    1. Meanwhile, I hope college students will go forth, outside the campus bubble, and help people. The relationships they form will generate orders of magnitude more wisdom and understanding about people unlike themselves than any social-justice dogma.

      It seems that the guide offered a one size fits all way to be an ally only by looking inward without being specific as to how to do this.

    2. The high school volunteers mentioned above and the special-needs community with whom they allied are both better off for the fact that service to others through outward action was emphasized, rather than inward reflection on privilege.

      Is being an ally offering a service, creating a bond, and then that leads to increased advocacy? Our connection to other people changes our ability to see the world.

    1. This is this really kind of a generational upheaval. We can either make some serious structural changes, redistribute power and wealth in a way that we haven't been willing to consider in the past.

      It's well past time to reconsider the changes and reparations we need to make.

    2. I think at the time of the Rodney King beating it was easier to view it as an isolated incident or as a few bad apples. But now, over time, we see a persistent and pervasive pattern. Over years and years.

      I think the pervasiveness of the incidents being recored make a difference. It is difficult to unsee a murder. It makes me wonder about all of the incidents that occurred and were not able to be documented.

    3. I think a lot of people, when they saw that video of George Floyd, who weren't in the black community, felt agony.

      It was murder.

    4. The protests and marches today you see are multiethnic, multicultural, even multigenerational. And the allyship is something that is more pronounced now than it perhaps once was.

      That's what I have seen at protests here.

    1. In a 2014 report by the Sentencing Project, a national nonprofit, 68% of Black respondents said the U.S. justice system is biased against Black people compared with 25% of whites. The report went on to say that white perceptions of overall fairness led to greater levels of punitive sentencing for people of color.

      whites have a high perception of overall fairness in sentencing

    1. n the early 2010s, as grassroots Black demonstrations emerged after the killings of Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner in New York City, both state and federal government were again there to watch. Protest and advocacy organizations such as Black Lives Matter and government-labeled “Black Identity Extremists” are being monitored and infiltrated.[15]

      infiltration by city, state, and federal govts. monitored movements such as Black Lives Matter as "Black Identity Extremists."

    2. ervasive government surveillance in America is not a new phenomenon. Government monitoring and suppression of Black speech and conduct has been an essential feature of American society far before the public at large realized the potential dangers of widespread surveillance. Although privacy is a national value, it has been an elusive concept for Black people in America.

      Privacy is an elusive concept for Black people in America

    1. Many people know that during World War II, innocent Americans of Japanese descent were surveilled and detained in internment camps. Fewer people know that in the wake of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson openly feared that black servicemen returning from Europe would become “the greatest medium in conveying Bolshevism to America.” Around the same time, the Military Intelligence Division created a special “Negro Subversion” section devoted to spying on black Americans. Near the top of its list was W.E.B. DuBois, a “rank Socialist” whom they tracked in Paris for fear he would “attempt to introduce socialist tendencies at the Peace Conference.”

      Woodrow Wilson's Military Intelligence Division created a "Negro Subversion" section..WEB DuBois at top of list.

    2. We now find ourselves in a new surveillance debate—and the lessons of the King scandal should weigh heavy on our minds. A few months after the first Edward Snowden revelation, the National Security Agency disclosed that it had itself wiretapped King in the late 1960s. Yet what happened to King is almost entirely absent from our current conversation. In NSA reform debates in the House of Representatives, King was mentioned only a handful of times, usually in passing. And notwithstanding a few brave speeches by senators such as Patrick Leahy and Rand Paul outside of the Senate, the available Senate record suggests that in two years of actual hearings and floor debates, no one ever spoke his name.  

      NSA had wiretapped Dr. MLK

    1. However, within copyright law exists the doctrine of fair use, which allows for use of a copyrighted work in the creation of new work without permission, as long as the use fits within certain parameters.

      Fair use is nice that we have that, it gives people leeway to express themselves.

    2. Image-based memes are easy to create and easy to spread, though whether they will go viral is never a given. If you create or post one, remember to pay attention to the source of the image. Your best bet is to start with an image or clip that is already labeled for reuse or is in the public domain, meaning out of copyright protection altogether.

      If your a librarian and want to make a Meme, this would be good information to know about.

    1. Algorithms are taking over – and woe betide anyone they class as a 'deadbeat' This article is more than 1 year old Zoe Williams

      title of article in The Guardian July 12, 2018

    1. The more difficult question concerns whether scoring systems’ source code, algorithmic predictions, and modeling should be transparent to affected individuals and ultimately the public at large. Neil Richards and Jonathan King astutely explain that “there are legitimate arguments for some level of big data secrecy,” including concerns “connected to highly sensitive intellectual property and national security assets.”146 But these concerns are more than outweighed by the threats to human dignity posed by pervasive, secret, and automated scoring systems

      while this article treats credit scores predicted by algorithms, the effect of the secret scoring systems on jobs, housing, and opportunities are widespread and often unable to be challenged...reminds me of what happens with too much faith in ai surveillance without due process for those affected

    2. 05 - Citron & Pasquale Article.docx (Do Not Delete)3/26/2014 2:47 PM14 WASHINGTON LAW REVIEW[Vol. 89:1 and data behind them.73 Software engineers construct the datasets mined by scoring systems; they define the parameters of data-mining analyses; they create the clusters, links, and decision trees applied;74 they generate the predictive models applied.75 The biases and values of system developers and software programmers are embedded into each and every step of development

      Biases of system developers and software programmers

    3. 05 - Citron & Pasquale Article.docx (Do Not Delete)3/26/2014 2:47 PMTHE SCORED SOCIETY: DUE PROCESS FOR AUTOMATED PREDICTIONSDanielle Keats Citron* & Frank Pasquale**Abstract: Big Data is increasingly mined to rank and rate individuals. Predictive algorithms assess whether we are good credit risks, desirable employees, reliable tenants, valuable customers—or deadbeats, shirkers, menaces, and “wastes of time.

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  2. Jun 2020
    1. On Saturday May 30th filmmaker and photographer David Jones of David Jones Media felt compelled to go out and serve the community in some way. He decided to use his art to try and explain the events that were currently impacting our lives. On day two, Sunday the 31st, he activated his dear friend author Kimberly Jones to tag along and conduct interviews. During a moment of downtime he captured these powerful words from her and felt the world couldn’t wait for the full length documentary, they needed to hear them now. Show less Show more

      This is a powerful video where this young woman wonders why people are focusing on the what instead of focusing on the why

    2. The Most Intense Heartfelt Description Of Racism I Ever Filmed225,347 views225K views•Jun 17, 2020 15K 284 Share Save 15,382 / 284 David Hoffman David Hoffman Verified 395K subscribers Subscribe As my subscribers know, I have done thousands of interviews in my life. This interview with journalist, civil rights advocate, lawyer Roger Wilkins was one that I never forgot. I asked him to be straight and honest with me and to speak to his grandchildren in the future, of his experiences. That is exactly what he did, with such intensity and clarity. During this challenging time with the black lives matter movement and police unfairness and the coronavirus pandemic, I thought that I would present Roger's comments again. I always felt that every student (at any age) should hear Roger to better understand what was experienced by so many Americans during slavery, in the 1940s, the 1950s, the 1960s, and, to some extent, today. I want to take the time in this description to thank Roger Wilkins for the effort and energy he put into his responses to my questions. Show less Show more

      This was filmed in 1989 with Roger Wilkins explaining his experiences of racism in the 1950s and 60s, released by David Hoffman ..gently describing the horrendous https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXUFiXeNZV4 Excellent background for those recently aware

    3. ohn Oliver takes a look at facial recognition technology, how it’s used by private companies and law enforcement, and why it can be dangerous.

      Baltimore police in the Freddy Gray marches used facial recognition to identify and target different people--there is no framework used...a man in England who blocks his face is then photographed by police...the Capability is the Austrailian new launch of this technology..

    4. Facial Recognition: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)

      June 15, 2020 the expansion of applications brings a host of privacy and civil liberty issues

    1. One of the most shocking things that many of us learned when the Covid-19 pandemic was first landing on our shores, and we were weighing the pros and cons of closing the schools, was that for tens of millions of American kids, going to school represents the only guarantee of a decent meal on any given day. I’m pretty confident that most of the kids we’re talking about here aren’t white. And whatever you think about the opportunities in this country and whatever individual success stories you can call to mind, there is no question that some of us start on third base, or second base. Everyone has a lot to deal with, of course. Life is hard. But not everyone is a single mom, or single grandparent, struggling to raise kids in the inner city, all the while trying to keep them from getting murdered. The disparities in our society are absolutely heartbreaking and unacceptable. And we need to have a rational discussion about their actual causes and solutions. We have to pull back from the brink here. And all we have with which to do that is conversation. And the only thing that makes conversation possible is an openness to evidence and arguments—a willingness to update one’s view of the world when better reasons are given.

      The bulk of this podcast questions many recent assumptions...about policing, about anti-racism too, though I'm not sure he sees this as I do..and I am not on board with some of his perspective...but he got me thinking

    2. How much of this is inequality due to the legacy of slavery? And how much of it is due to an ensuing century of racist policies? I’m prepared to believe quite a lot. And it strikes me as totally legitimate to think about paying reparations as a possible remedy here.

      The NYTimes magazine of Sunday, June 28 has an extraordinary essay about reparations “What is owed”

    3. with social media, we’ve all been enrolled in a psychological experiment for which no one gave consent, and it’s not at all clear how it will turn out. And it’s still not clear how it will turn out, but it’s not looking good. It’s fairly disorienting out there. All information is becoming weaponized. All communication is becoming performative. And on the most important topics, it now seems to be fury and sanctimony and bad faith almost all the time.

      I learned about Sam Harris from Marina, and I listened to his recent podcast

    1. There are parents who will not have their children's faces appear anywhere on the internet, including sending emails of photos...I cannot imagine how the parents of that small child peering over her seat reacted if they were made aware of this inadvertent web appearance

    2. In some cases, our use of cellphone cameras has the potential to liberate us when directed at the state, subjecting the powerful and privileged to forms of accountability that they’re not used to. That’s been made plain by the significant role of cellphone video in the movement against police brutality.

      The cell phone has come to be seen as doing more for civil rights than anything in many years--especially in the recent killing of George Floyd and the awareness (finally) of many Americans about the blatant injustices that have gone unchecked.

    3. The story’s charm disguises the invasion of privacy at its heart: the way technology is both eroding our personal boundaries and coercing us in deleterious ways.

      A story that serves as momentary entertainment for many can wreak havoc on those it is about. In this case, a young woman who values her privacy has to hire an attorney and remove herself from the internet...while others enjoy their fifteen minutes of fame.

    1. unintended consequences

      This is exactly the situation in the Plane Bae situation

    2. Online vigilantism has been around since the early days of the internet. So has “doxxing” — originally a slang term among hackers for obtaining and posting private documents about an individual, usually a rival or enemy.

      Origin of term doxxing

    1. This article introduces a new strategic framework developed for addressing micro-aggressions that moves beyond coping and survival to concrete action steps and dialogues that targets, allies, and bystanders can perform (micro-interventions).

    2. APA Reference

    1. ’m talking with professor Ibram X. Kendi, New York Times bestselling author of How to Be an Antiracist and the Director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University. We talk about racial disparities, policy, and equality, but we really focus on How to Be an Antiracist, which is a groundbreaking approach to understanding uprooting racism and inequality in our society and in
    1. Why are so many unarmed black people being killed by police while armed white people are simply arrested? Why are officials addressing violent crime in poorer neighborhoods by adding more police instead of more jobs?
    1. Ms. Williams, a real estate marketing director and food blogger, also tweeted at the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan, which took an immediate interest.

      smart wife

    2. The Friday that Mr. Williams sat in a Detroit police interrogation room was the day before his 42nd birthday. That morning, his wife emailed his boss to say he would miss work because of a family emergency; it broke his four-year record of perfect attendance.In Mr. Williams’s recollection, after he held the surveillance video still next to his face, the two detectives leaned back in their chairs and looked at one another. One detective, seeming chagrined, said to his partner: “I guess the computer got it wrong.”

      Apologies??

    1. The stakes are too high in criminal investigations to rely on unreliable—or wrong—inputs. It is one thing for a company to build a face recognition system designed to help individuals find their celebrity doppelgänger6 or painting lookalike7 for entertainment purposes. It's quite another to use these techniques to identify criminal suspects, who may be deprived of their liberty and ultimately prosecuted based on the match. Unfortunately, police departments' reliance on questionable probe photos appears all too common.

      linked to the article on Mr. Williams's wrongful arrest

    1. Some of the students are at BHS. One who spoke at the protest on 6/20/20, was very moving.

    1. This List Of Books, Films And Podcasts About Racism Is A Start, Not A Panacea

      Code Switch is a podcast I already subscribe to and it's a good source of information.

    2. And it will be a multipart process.

      This is something that will be revisited again and again.

    1. The designation no longer exists?” Pressley asked.“It hasn’t existed since I’ve been here for 17 months,” McGarrity replied. “We are not using ‘black identity extremists’ as a term or for a group.”Advertisement

      Why didn't they have someone who could answer Pressley questions.

    2. there’s no domestic terrorism charge.”To be clear, there is a law that defines domestic terrorism but not one that charges people who commit acts of terrorism in America. People who conspire with international terrorists—even if they aren’t materially involved in an act of violence—are charged with “

      I was shocked by this. As a nation we've been burdened with domestic terrorism for far too long to not have laws in place that address this problem directly.

    3. The subcommittee noted that there was a 17 percent increase in reported hate crimes in 2017 from the previous year and a 31 percent increase since 2014. And in spite of the ADL’s report that white supremacists were responsible for 78 percent of extremist murders in 2018, the FBI still dedicates most of its time, money and manpower to investigating and stopping international terrorism. According to the Daily Beast, the Trump administration even disbanded a unit in the Department of Homeland Security dedicated to domestic terrorism and right-wing extremists, upsetting many intelligence and law enforcement officials. cnxps.cmd.push(function () { cnxps({ playerId: '4e065883-27be-43c1-b568-898f10d3390b' }).render('f10c6314028348d6baed500a30d59066'); }); G/O Media may get a commissionSave Your Floors From Dirt and Grime With $130 off a Dyson V10 Cordless Vacuum From NeweggDyson V10 Cordless Vacuum (Refurbished)Buy for $270 from Newegg“The FBI has testified the bureau allocates its resources almost exactly backwards than the problem would suggest,” Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) said. “Devoting 80 percent of field agents to stopping international terrorism including Islamic extremism and only 20 percent to stopping domestic terrorism including far right and white supremacist extremism.”

      This is sad and shocking, but not really.

    4. Pressley: How many extremist murders has the FBI linked to Black Lives Matter or similar black activist groups? McGarrity: We don’t work Black Lives Matter it’s a movement. It’s an ideology. We don’t work that. Pressley: So the answer is none. Can you just say that for the record? There has been no killing that the FBI can link to black Lives Matter or similar black activist groups, to your knowledge.McGarrity: To my knowledge—I’d have to go back—but to my knowledge, right now, no.

      This is a surprisingly clear look into the motives & actions of the FBI. If we take was McGarrity is saying to be truthful, then although black extremist-adjacent topics may have been linked to murders, Black Lives Matter is not a focus for the FBI. This is positive, as there is no evidence linking Black Lives Matter to the types of hate crimes historically committed by white supremacist groups.

    5. McGarrity explained that right-wing extremists like the Tree of Life Synagogue shooter in Pittsburgh were charged with hate crimes instead of domestic terrorism simply because “there’s no domestic terrorism charge.”To be clear, there is a law that defines domestic terrorism but not one that charges people who commit acts of terrorism in America. People who conspire with international terrorists—even if they aren’t materially involved in an act of violence—are charged with “acts of terrorism transcending international boundaries.” But someone who sends pipe bombs to Democrats; plows through a crowd of anti-racism protesters in Charlottesville, Va.; or shoots up a church in Charleston, S.C., will not face domestic terrorism charges.

      I believe that there should be a "domestic terrorism" charge, to more accurately represent the crimes that are being committed. While hate crimes are also a good representation of the crimes being committed, these are not purely crimes of hate. They are crimes associated with mass destruction of property or life.

    1. Gregory McMichael “stated he was in his front yard and saw the suspect from the break-ins ‘hauling ass’” down the road, according to the police report. McMichael “stated there have been several Break-ins in the neighborhood and further the suspect was caught on surveillance video,” the report said. But where is the surveillance video linking Arbery to a recent burglary? And McMichael’s neighborhood had gone seven weeks without a reported burglary, a local police lieutenant recently told CNN. The last reported burglary was on January 1, when a 9-mm pistol was stolen from an unlocked truck outside the McMichaels’ home.

      Claiming a robbery caught on a non-existent surveillance video

    1. Go up to the “omnibar” Strip off everything after the domain name, type wikipedia and press enter This generates a Google search for that URL with the Wikipedia page at the top Click that link, then check in the sidebar that the URL matches. Forty-nine out of fifty times it will. The fiftieth time you may have some work to do.

      This is a useful tip. Wikipedia is a very trustworthy website. I use alexa.com to check out websites.

    2. There are some hard problems with misinformation on the web. But for the average user, a lot of what goes wrong comes down to failure to follow simple and quick processes of verification and contextualization. Not after you start thinking, but before you do.

      This is a good reminder to always check because of misinformation.

    3. Your methods of checking have to be really quick. They have to be habitual, automatic. They can’t be cognitively expensive.

      I agree

    4. This is an easy to technique to check the information source.

    5. I appreciated his idea of a quick and habitual check.

    6. If you’re a human being reading this on the internet and if you’re not a time traveler from some future, better world, there is less than a one in a hundred chance you do the sort of checks we’re showing regularly. And if you do do this regularly — and not just for the stuff that feels fishy — then my guesstimate is you’re about two to three standard devs out from the mean. Now imagine a world where checking your mirrors before switching lanes was rare, three standard-deviations-out behavior. What would the roads look like? Well, it’d probably look like the Mad Max-like smoking heap of collisions, car fires, and carnage that is our modern web.

      I find this to be a very striking visual of what happens when we, as sharers of content, do not independently verify our sources, and blindly share them along. There's a stereotype about grandparents sharing along links to less-than-reputable news articles. By participating in this behaviour, grandparents end up digging themselves into filter bubbles and pockets of misinformation, no matter their good intentions.

      I admit, that although I try to be web-literate, I'm certainly not the perfect example of web/information/digital literacy. Sometimes, I forget to check sources, or I end up using a source I thought was a different source. (Darn you, fake websites that switch out .edu/.net with .com) By implementing Mike Caulfield's steps to check one's sources, I can make sure that I am disseminating useful and reliable information sources in the future.

    7. digital literacy needs to start with the mirror and head-checks before it gets to automotive repair or controlled skids. Because it is these simple behaviors, applied as habits and enforced as norms, that have the power to change the web as we know it, to break our cycle of reaction and recognition, and ultimately to get even our deeper investigations off to a better start.

      I love his analogy and can understand his mission-like zeal. He provides such a clear explanation on how to make his suggestions into habits.

    1. This story is true. The violence white supremacist bring to our country is a terrorist threat. This was admitted in a Congressional hearing.

    1. ut never before have the cries carried this kind of muscle. Among American voters, support for the Black Lives Matter movement grew in the first two weeks of protests almost as much as it did in the preceding two years.

      This is an entire section of today's news...in the morning of Memorial Day Chris Cooper is in the Ramble birdwatching...and then threatened...and that night George Floyd is killed...both incidents recorded on cell phones. Black Lives Matter--begun six years ago--has taken flight...four articles in the WSJ in one day...it seems as if we finally have reached a turning point, at least in awareness

    1. supplement protests with other actions, such as supporting black-owned businesses and donating to bail funds and advocacy groups.

      what to do now

    1. The killing of Mr. Floyd, Mr. Boyer said, brought a shift in perceptions of what Mr. Kaepernick was trying to achieve. “Whereas kneeling was received as such a divisive gesture, it’s sort of become a uniting gesture,” he said. “But it takes a lot more to actually change” the system that athletes like Mr. Kaepernick are protesting against.

      shift in attitudes--four years later

    1. The ACLU of Southern California has fought for decades against police abuse and for policing that is equitable, transparent and democratic. In the courts, in city halls, in the legislature, the ACLU SoCal has challenged excessive force, racial profiling, broken-windows policing and dragnet surveillance.

      racial profiling, policing, surveillance

    1. The FBI came under heavy criticism in 2017 for creating the designation ”Black Identity Extremist” as a discriminatory measure to target racial-justice advocates for surveillance and prosecution. Similarly, the DHS memo appears to wrongly characterize peaceful, anti-racist groups carrying out protests as worthy of invasive and persistent surveillance. “We are concerned that biases and inaccuracies reflected in the ‘Race Paper’ could result in unconstitutional law enforcement activities throughout the country that disproportionately impact activists, protesters, and communities of color,” reads the letter. The signers include 18 Million Rising, the American Civil Liberties Union, the Brennan Center for Justice, the Center for Media Justice, Color Of Change, Free Press, the Muslim Justice League, the NAACP, the National Lawyers Guild, Project Censored, the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law and the Southern Poverty Law Center.

      Reading about the race paper mentioned in Harriot's article--and DHS's sending a pdf of nine black sheets of paper--led me to see where this later led and to the website of rightsanddissent.org. What an insult--to make policy based on information that is not shared with those it most affects.

    1. So here it is. And here is what it expresses — my utter shock that when talking to some otherwise intelligent adults about the fact that we are not educating our students to be critical consumers of web content, or to use networks to solve problems, etc — my utter shock that often as not the response to this problem is “Well, if students would just stop getting information from the web and go back to books, this whole problem would go away.”

      This perspective is something I have never encountered among instructors at DVC...though there has always been concern about students tracking down legitimate sources rather than accepting something just because they see it on the web.

  3. Oct 2019
    1. But Tony McAleer, a former white supremacist leader who now runs Life After Hate, a rehabilitation program for neo-Nazis, called doxxing a “ passive aggressive violence.”

      I would agree that this kind of activity is passive aggressive and is different than revealing someone's previously chosen hidden identity.

    2. “Some of what is happening now will make these white supremacists realize why their grandparents wore hoods,” Ms. Wilson said. “At least then there was shame.”

      Interesting logic. If these current protesters aren't bothered by their identities being known then clearly other things are at play and approaches other than vigilantism seem would be more constructive.

    3. One of the concerning aspects of Internet vigilantism is the nature of the internet being both ephemeral (due to the overwhelming amount of new, incoming information) and eternal (due to the nature of reaction and spread of information) simultaneously

    4. This level of engagement is clearly different from the beginning nature of doxxing revealing the identity of other hackers. The notion of the general public "jumping in the fray" creates a feeling of chaos and disregard of any private rights. If everyone does not respect privacy, I am afraid going out in any public setting is now opening up yourself to any and all forms of privacy-breaches.

    5. In short, once someone is labeled a Nazi on the internet, that person stays a Nazi on the internet.Internet vigilantism has a checkered history.

      One of the concerning aspects of Internet vigilantism is the nature of the internet being both ephemeral (due to the overwhelming amount of new, incoming information) and eternal (due to the nature of reaction and spread of information) simultaneously

    6. “People went berserk,” Ms. Coleman said. “That, to me, was this interesting turning point where it showed the general public would be willing to jump into the fray.”Charlottesville has made doxxing even more commonplace.“For a long time it was only a certain quarter of people on the internet who would be willing to do this,” Ms. Coleman said. “It was very much hinged on certain geek cultures, but there was an extraordinary quality to the Charlottesville protest. It was such a strong public display I think it just opened the gates.”

      This level of engagement is clearly different from the beginning nature of doxxing revealing the identity of other hackers. The notion of the general public "jumping in the fray" creates a feeling of chaos and disregard of any private rights. If everyone does not respect privacy, I am afraid going out in any public setting is now opening up yourself to any and all forms of privacy-breaches.

    7. The ethics — and even the definition — of doxxing is murky. It is the dissemination of often publicly available information. And, some at the protest asked, are you really doxxing a person if he or she is marching on a public street, face revealed and apparently proud? It is not as though they are hiding their identities.

      doxxing seems to be an act of black mailing done online by people who wish to be anonymous towards those they feel are there enemies however when it's done in person, its questionable if considered to be doxxing.

    8. “For a long time it was only a certain quarter of people on the internet who would be willing to do this,” Ms. Coleman said. “It was very much hinged on certain geek cultures, but there was an extraordinary quality to the Charlottesville protest. It was such a strong public display I think it just opened the gates.”

      I think this to be true. For a while doxxing as they say wasn't something really heard of besides in the online game world. That quickly has changed and now we see doxxing going on in many forms. An example was in the last election when Wikileaks leaked out documents on certain candidates.

    9. Marla Wilson, 35, of San Francisco, said she was appalled when she saw white supremacists marching so brazenly in Charlottesville. Doxxing, she believed, was an effective way to make people think twice about being so bold with their racism.

      By actively participating in the march a person marching can be assumed to believe in what the marchers are promoting; a danger would be to dox a bystander who may be observing, or protesting the march.

    10. she believed, was an effective way to make people think twice about being so bold with their racism.

      This does sound like a form of public shaming, to prevent an undesired behavior, but it could go so wrong. Like the prof from earlier in the article, but when there is no law citizens tend to take it into their own hands.

  4. Jul 2019
    1. Meme creators and posters have been sued for using people’s images without permission, especially those who were not already public figures. In 2003, the parents of the unwilling star of the “Star Wars Kid” video sued their son’s classmates for posting the video online.

      That's just awful. Can't get passed how sharing someones image or a video without their knowledge can lead to cyberbullying and over all is a huge invasion of privacy that we should all be entitled to.

    2. In using images taken from creative works or private life, memes show how copyright law intersects with issues of internet use and privacy.

      Memes are made by using creative works, or from people's private lives. Memes spread fast over the internet causing havoc and interfering with people's privacy.

    3. Image-based memes involve, primarily, an image created by somebody. Sometimes the meme creator is also the image creator, but often, when involving movie stills or images of celebrities, the image’s copyright is owned by someone else. American copyright law gives creators the exclusive rights of reproduction, modification, distribution, performance, and display. The viral spread of a meme infringes on theses protections as the original image is modified and then displayed, distributed and reproduced when posted and reposted.

      I believe that doctrine of "fair use" allows for use of copyrighted work, however when a meme goes viral, there isn't a way to stop distribution and reposts. This is like a wildfire that cannot be stopped.

    4. Lantagne notes that if memes are considered a form of communication, they are also subject to the limits placed on speech including the rights of others to privacy.

      It's interesting that memes going virally replicated is a form of digital communication as the article states. Could memes be a form of participatory culture? If so, then a percentage of memes are used purposely to promote a celebrity or make non-public person a celebrity; and they are also used inadvertently to the detriment of someone, to the point of damaging someone's life or reputation.

    5. . If you create or post one, remember to pay attention to the source of the image.

      I agree. However, does memes database have a written netiquette rules in place?

    6. When you see a meme going around, give a thought to the subject of that meme image, whose life may forever be changed.

      The article on the dark side of "Plane Bae" illustrates the reality of this statement.

    7. Meme histories are tracked from first appearance, providing a reference of viral memes.

      I would love to study the spread of some of my favorite memes to learn when they originated and hypothesize about how they reached my screen. Fascinating!

    8. When memes or the subjects of a meme are used for commercial purposes without permission, the meme creator may sue, as the effect of the commercial use on the market value of the original meme usually prevents a finding of fair use.

      This quote can tell that it is necessary to protect the copyright of the memes creators, which can create the healthy and sustainable development in this field.

    9. Lantagne and Patel agree on the inability of copyright law to fully address the subject of memes, given their cultural importance as what Lantagne calls “pure engines of expression with their own symbolic vocabulary” while also relying, in Patel’s words, on “massive unauthorized copying” to attain such importance.

      I think this speaks of the freedom of speech in that someone can use an image to make a meme if they are being creative, but not doing it for monetary gain.

    10. “[j]ust as genes propagate themselves in the gene pool by leaping from body to body via sperms or eggs, so memes propagate themselves in the meme pool by leaping from brain to brain via a process which, in the broad sense, can be called imitation.”

      very interesting way to think about it, i never thought of it like that.

    11. she identifies use ranging from “static,” a relatively straightforward reproduction of an image, to “mutating,” in which the role of the internet is directly responsible for the meme’s alteration from the original to the point that “[m]utating memes, because of their unique characteristics, are more like ideas,” thus unprotected under copyright.

      this very true. the meaning of a meme depends on how someone interprets it; the message they are trying to convey, I never really thought about how memes can be apart of culture and jump from person to person giving memes new meanings.

    12. Meme creators and posters have been sued for using people’s images without permission, especially those who were not already public figures. In 2003, the parents of the unwilling star of the “Star Wars Kid” video sued their son’s classmates for posting the video online.

      I have often wondered about this type of scenario, where a photograph of someone becomes a meme - but it gets out of control before they have the permission of the person in the photo. Unfortunately, there will probably always be the meme floating out there somewhere, even if you win your lawsuit.

    13. Sometimes the meme creator is also the image creator, but often, when involving movie stills or images of celebrities, the image’s copyright is owned by someone else. American copyright law gives creators the exclusive rights of reproduction, modification, distribution, performance, and display. The viral spread of a meme infringes on theses protections as the original image is modified and then displayed, distributed and reproduced when posted and reposted. However, within copyright law exists the doctrine of fair use, which allows for use of a copyrighted work in the creation of new work without permission, as long as the use fits within certain parameters. A legal finding of fair use takes into account the following factors: The purpose of the use, The amount of the work to be used, The effect of the use on the market for or value of the original work, and The nature of the copyrighted work. There is no official definitive answer for whether a use can be considered fair, as every case must be judged on its own merits, but there are some types of use generally allowed under fair use, including criticism and commentary, parody, journalism, education, and research.

      These are important parameters regarding fair use. Using memes by a corporation for commercial use seems to be the most blatant breech of this type, as also communicated in the lecture.

    14. Meme creators and posters have been sued for using people’s images without permission, especially those who were not already public figures.

      This still violates people’s rights of privacy. The memes can also be closely related to the law in terms of privacy. This article provides readers with more information about how to protect the user’s privacy based on the open and widely used internet.

    15. If you create or post one, remember to pay attention to the source of the image. Your best bet is to start with an image or clip that is already labeled for reuse or is in the public domain, meaning out of copyright protection altogether. Google Images search tools provides such a filter, or try the Creative Commons search for work licensed for reuse via Creative Commons licenses.

      Even if not creating or posting a meme, this is very good info to know for checking sources for using images. I'll be paying much closer attention.

    16. The viral spread of a meme infringes on theses protections as the original image is modified and then displayed, distributed and reproduced when posted and reposted.

      I've gotten a full education about memes this module as I'd never thought anything about them, and didn't know that people alter them. It is then very interesting to consider the ethics.

    1. We are all watching each other, mining each other’s lives for “content” that we give for free to large corporations who then monetize it.

      It's so true, we keep our eyes and ears open towards strangers hoping to find something entertaining enough to put on the internet. I've never taken a photo of a stranger or recorded a stranger.. because first of all, I've never felt there was a real reason to. Secondly, I wouldn't want a stranger doing that to me. We all do weird, goofy, embarrassing things.. no one wants that unknowingly posted for others entertainment.

    2. The story’s charm disguises the invasion of privacy at its heart: the way technology is both eroding our personal boundaries and coercing us in deleterious ways.

      I agree that technology is affecting our personal boundaries, and forcing people to be public when they would rather stay private.

    3. This is the problem with ex post facto consent being used to justify these sorts of invasions. What if it’s not given? The world floods into your life anyway. What had been private is now uncontrollably crowdsourced. Your consent becomes a trifling detail in a story about you that suddenly belongs to everyone else.

      I agree that ex post facto consent is allowing for a invasion of privacy that puts your private life into the public eye.

    4. Until she has nothing left to give, and the next thread about some other person plucked from obscurity comes along.

      It's interesting that the tweeter, the memes and other sites are seen/used as net-soap-operas. However, one could use them wisely and turn around the negative intricate. But for this to happen, we need to educate people not only how to look for information but also how to use them wisely following some basic netiquette rules in the fast paced digital world.

    5. We are all watching each other, mining each other’s lives for “content” that we give for free to large corporations who then monetize it.

      It's sad that people allow the companies to manipulate their own lives as content for the monetary benefits of the companies.

    6. There are also sobering lessons here about the limits and ethics of “sousveillance,” the use of our handheld devices to record from “below.” (This is in contrast to surveillance from on-high, a la CCTV or drones.)

      new vocab word! and an important concept to consider in conversations about ethics and civil life.

    7. Of course, the sexual implication is something he’d be praised for, while the woman is attacked.

      Ugh, this is very uncool (though predictable).

    8. At a certain level of virality, you cannot stop motivated people on the internet from piercing your veils.

      According to this sentence, it shows that the internet is still a dangerous place for all people. People still should be cautious to protect their privacy.

    9. The story’s charm disguises the invasion of privacy at its heart: the way technology is both eroding our personal boundaries and coercing us in deleterious ways.

      This tells that the technology is threatening people’s personal boundaries and privacy. The author has introduced the disadvantages of this phenomenon in many aspects. The author has provided a lot of ideas about how people understand the dark side of the social media.

    10. What had been private is now uncontrollably crowdsourced. Your consent becomes a trifling detail in a story about you that suddenly belongs to everyone else. It doesn’t matter otherwise.

      Crowdsourced disempowerment? Is there an implicit "yes"?

    11. The story’s charm disguises the invasion of privacy at its heart: the way technology is both eroding our personal boundaries and coercing us in deleterious ways.

      How true! I wonder how numbed we are to invasions of our privacy.

    1. she believed, was an effective way to make people think twice about being so bold with their racism.

      This does sound like a form of public shaming, to prevent an undesired behavior, but it could go so wrong. Like the prof from earlier in the article, but when there is no law citizens tend to take it into their own hands.

    2. Marla Wilson, 35, of San Francisco, said she was appalled when she saw white supremacists marching so brazenly in Charlottesville. Doxxing, she believed, was an effective way to make people think twice about being so bold with their racism.

      By actively participating in the march a person marching can be assumed to believe in what the marchers are promoting; a danger would be to dox a bystander who may be observing, or protesting the march.

    3. “For a long time it was only a certain quarter of people on the internet who would be willing to do this,” Ms. Coleman said. “It was very much hinged on certain geek cultures, but there was an extraordinary quality to the Charlottesville protest. It was such a strong public display I think it just opened the gates.”

      I think this to be true. For a while doxxing as they say wasn't something really heard of besides in the online game world. That quickly has changed and now we see doxxing going on in many forms. An example was in the last election when Wikileaks leaked out documents on certain candidates.

    4. The ethics — and even the definition — of doxxing is murky. It is the dissemination of often publicly available information. And, some at the protest asked, are you really doxxing a person if he or she is marching on a public street, face revealed and apparently proud? It is not as though they are hiding their identities.

      doxxing seems to be an act of black mailing done online by people who wish to be anonymous towards those they feel are there enemies however when it's done in person, its questionable if considered to be doxxing.

    5. “People went berserk,” Ms. Coleman said. “That, to me, was this interesting turning point where it showed the general public would be willing to jump into the fray.”Charlottesville has made doxxing even more commonplace.“For a long time it was only a certain quarter of people on the internet who would be willing to do this,” Ms. Coleman said. “It was very much hinged on certain geek cultures, but there was an extraordinary quality to the Charlottesville protest. It was such a strong public display I think it just opened the gates.”

      This level of engagement is clearly different from the beginning nature of doxxing revealing the identity of other hackers. The notion of the general public "jumping in the fray" creates a feeling of chaos and disregard of any private rights. If everyone does not respect privacy, I am afraid going out in any public setting is now opening up yourself to any and all forms of privacy-breaches.

    6. In short, once someone is labeled a Nazi on the internet, that person stays a Nazi on the internet.Internet vigilantism has a checkered history.

      One of the concerning aspects of Internet vigilantism is the nature of the internet being both ephemeral (due to the overwhelming amount of new, incoming information) and eternal (due to the nature of reaction and spread of information) simultaneously

    7. This level of engagement is clearly different from the beginning nature of doxxing revealing the identity of other hackers. The notion of the general public "jumping in the fray" creates a feeling of chaos and disregard of any private rights. If everyone does not respect privacy, I am afraid going out in any public setting is now opening up yourself to any and all forms of privacy-breaches.

    8. One of the concerning aspects of Internet vigilantism is the nature of the internet being both ephemeral (due to the overwhelming amount of new, incoming information) and eternal (due to the nature of reaction and spread of information) simultaneously

    9. “Some of what is happening now will make these white supremacists realize why their grandparents wore hoods,” Ms. Wilson said. “At least then there was shame.”

      Interesting logic. If these current protesters aren't bothered by their identities being known then clearly other things are at play and approaches other than vigilantism seem would be more constructive.

    10. But Tony McAleer, a former white supremacist leader who now runs Life After Hate, a rehabilitation program for neo-Nazis, called doxxing a “ passive aggressive violence.”

      I would agree that this kind of activity is passive aggressive and is different than revealing someone's previously chosen hidden identity.

  5. Jun 2019
    1. lways, always hover, and see what they are verified for.

      whoa, quick and easy trick! I'll definitely use it.

    2. Now imagine a world where checking your mirrors before switching lanes was rare, three standard-deviations-out behavior. What would the roads look like?

      what would the roads of the modern web look like if folks did regularly do this, on Facebook for instance?

    3. You can absolutely do this every time before you share. And given it is so easy, it’s irresponsible not to.

      They are advocating a behavior change that should restrict passing on erroneous information. I would like to make an analogy here but think it may be inappropriate in this context.

    4. It’s not enough to check the stuff that is suspicious: if you apply your investigations selectively, you’ve already lost the battle.

      Even if it isnt suspicious you should check it either way. You cant just fact check those that you believe may be false but rather all.

    5. the only viable literacy solution to web misinformation involves always checking any information in your stream that you find interesting, emotion-producing, or shareable.

      I agree that always checking information, which you find shareable or emotion-producing will help you in your online research.

    6. (Here’s a short rant of mine from 2009

      I checked this website he shared. Future plan in my future classes: re-teach students about the web education when they write their research paper.

    7. Scan the stories. If you want to be hypervigilant, scan for sources you recognize, and consider sharing one of the stories featuring original reporting instead of the tweet.

      You know a lot, don't doubt your knowledge, you know a lot of good and valid sources, use your brain. Check the receipts!

    8. But I end up coming back to this simple stuff because I can’t shake the feeling that digital literacy needs to start with the mirror and head-checks before it gets to automotive repair or controlled skids. Because it is these simple behaviors, applied as habits and enforced as norms, that have the power to change the web as we know it, to break our cycle of reaction and recognition, and ultimately to get even our deeper investigations off to a better start.

      After reading the article, I realized that it is extremely simple to check some of the things online that we are consuming, especially when we spend so much time on our devices. I haven't really checked what I was looking at or reading, except for school work, and I think that Caulfield has provided some easy ways for us to do so.

    9. Go up to the “omnibar” Strip off everything after the domain name, type wikipedia and press enter This generates a Google search for that URL with the Wikipedia page at the top Click that link, then check in the sidebar that the URL matches. Forty-nine out of fifty times it will. The fiftieth time you may have some work to do.

      Every tip is helpful, easy and doable. His article opened my eyes to all sorts of things I didn't know or was aware of.

    10. One of the things I’ve been trying to convince people for the past year and a half is that the only viable literacy solution to web misinformation involves always checking any information in your stream that you find interesting, emotion-producing, or shareable.

      I've seen too many facebook posts, and instagram stories with emotion provoking images and some false fact (usually heavy topics, including Roe) Then people go on to like that post or share it themselves.. so that completely false fact that shocks or disgusts people goes on to live another day. Have to check

    11. When a story is truly breaking, this is what it looks like. Our technique here is simple. Select some relevant text. Right-click or Cmd-click to search Google When you get to Google don’t stop, click the “News” tab to get a more curated feed Read and scan. Investigate more as necessary.

      This is very useful information, as I am new to Twitter and appreciate this valuable tool to check the validity of the posts.

    12. Go up to the “omnibar” Strip off everything after the domain name, type wikipedia and press enter This generates a Google search for that URL with the Wikipedia page at the top Click that link, then check in the sidebar that the URL matches.

      Nice trick. I'll have to remember to try that. Kind of reminds of how I do a search on Yahoo to see how my internet security software rates a site's 'trustworthiness', thereby avoiding site's that might infect my computer.

    13. But I end up coming back to this simple stuff because I can’t shake the feeling that digital literacy needs to start with the mirror and head-checks before it gets to automotive repair or controlled skids. Because it is these simple behaviors, applied as habits and enforced as norms, that have the power to change the web as we know it, to break our cycle of reaction and recognition, and ultimately to get even our deeper investigations off to a better start.

      First off i want to say what a great article, i really enjoyed reading it. I chose this quote because it pretty much sums up the article. It also explains a lot of what is already going on the media and ways we can improve. It's so true. If a lot more people would stop to look up if the information they heard or read about were true, then there would be so much less fake news. It's important to not be so quick to believe everything that is online.

    14. There are some hard problems with misinformation on the web. But for the average user, a lot of what goes wrong comes down to failure to follow simple and quick processes of verification and contextualization. Not after you start thinking, but before you do.

      This quote is right that people should always check before we start to use the information. In my opinion, I think people should form good habits to check, because it is good safeguard to use the right information, and people should stop to spread and stop to use the wrong information.

    1. white supremacists and right-wing violence are the biggest domestic terror threat but also admitted that federal agencies aren’t really doing anything about it.
    2. To be clear, there is a law that defines domestic terrorism but not one that charges people who commit acts of terrorism in America.

      There aren't any words for this! Utterly absurd and wrong. The terror that people in this country experience from hate crimes isn't different from international terrorism. It's criminal to be allowed.

    3. When it comes to any form of resistance or fight for equality, America will always paint black people as terrorists.

      Its quite sad to say that people believe or may even agree to this.

    4. were charged with hate crimes instead of domestic terrorism simply because “there’s no domestic terrorism charge.”

      I think that this was interesting because with the amount of time and effort that media and news outlets put into reporting and showing different shootings and acts of domestic terrorism, shouldn't there be some kind of punishment for that? It has happened enough that it is a social issue - we made it a social issue - and there is a definition for "domestic terrorism" in accordance with the law. Or, as it points out further down in the article, have a specific devision to investigate domestic terrorism threats.

    5. But when it comes to white people’s stance on black protest, as the great poet and philosopher Montero Lamar Hill once said: “Can’t nobody tell me nothing.”

      This is an article that has some good points.. the interview, the statistics, with sadly some biased thrown in. Shouldn't be an us against them mentality on either side.

    6. But when it comes to white people’s stance on black protest, as the great poet and philosopher Montero Lamar Hill once said: “Can’t nobody tell me nothing.”

      In my opinion, I think everyone has the same equal right in the world. However, according to the history, there are so many events present the white threat to the black. People should stop being that way, and we are supposed to stick together.

    1. The FBI said it has stopped using the "Black Identity Extremist" tag and acknowledged that white supremacist violence is the biggest terrorist threat this country faces.

      I am not surprised when the article stated, that white supremacist violence is the biggest terrorist threat that this country faces.

    2. black people specifically are 500 times more likely to die this way (Xu, Murphy, Kochanek, & Bastian, 2016).

      When someone mentions statistic data with work cited source in the parenthesis, it makes the info credible. I checked the source using Caulfield's method and found the article but couldn't find the number "500". I need to dig deeper.

    1. The Anti-Defamation League released its annual report, “Murder and Extremism in the United States 2018,” on Wednesday, which tracked murders perpetrated by all types of domestic extremists over the past year. According to their research, right-wing extremists killed more Americans in 2018 than they have in any year since 1995. The 50 extremist-related murders also made last year the fourth-deadliest year since 1970.The murders were overwhelmingly linked to white Americans. Only three deaths (or 6 percent of the extremist-related murders in 2018) were perpetrated by a black person.

      This is a shocking and very sad statistic. This article will change the way I read current event news regarding terrorism. Note: I checked the validity of these sources (The Root and ADL) using Caufield's Wikipedia technique and both checked out.

    1. According to the official, a significant issue that the bureau faces is that the federal criminal code has made it more challenging to bring charges against domestic terror suspects than in cases involving international terrorism or foreign terrorist organizations.

      i think that if a group individuals are going to be punished for doing something wrong such as acts of violence, those groups should all be punished the same way, no matter what the race is or where they come from.

    1. First there’s the Twitter bio and the headshot. The headshot is an original photo — a reverse image search here doesn’t turn up Maisy, but it doesn’t turn up anyone else — it’s less likely to be a stolen photo.

      This is interesting.

    1. This belief system, which I have come to think of as “educationism,” is grounded in a familiar story about cause and effect: Once upon a time, America created a public-education system that was the envy of the modern world. No nation produced more or better-educated high-school and college graduates, and thus the great American middle class was built.

      Look for additional uses of educationism.