34 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
  2. Jul 2020
    1. "Several studies have demonstrated pronounced benefits for black children with same-race teachers, ranging from better math performance to higher graduation rates," Lillian Mongueu May 12, 2017. This is important for people to understand because in an environment where children feel safe and welcomed, they will thrive. When a child feels unsafe, which minority children occasionally feel, it's harder to thrive and grow.

      The end of zero policy needs to happen, due to the prison to school pipeline.As suspension is becoming less of an option, more schools are moving straight to expulsion. The article The School to Prison pipeline, Explained by Libby Nelson & Dara Lind says that, " in many cases, schools themselves are the ones pushing students into the juvenile justice system — often by having students arrested at school." I had previously seen this at my high school, so I understood this as an all to real situation.

      “Ultimately, I want the kids to walk away with new eyes, to have a different perspective and appreciation for the uniqueness that is America. I want them to better understand the world that we live in,” says Joe Gamble, a high school teacher who has incorporated ethnic studies in his classroom. It is important for children to learn from all backgrounds, not just the versions in textbooks that have been written by the winners. People need to know and learn about history, because it is said if one doesn't learn, history will repeat itself.

    1. Their ultimate goal is to create in the present a future that overthrows the logic of neoliberalism
    2. They didn’t want equal opportunity in a burning house; they wanted to build a new house
    3. it never occurred to us to refuse to read a text simply because it validated the racism, sexism, free-market ideology, and bourgeois liberalism against which we railed. Nothing was off limits. On the contrary
    4. Study groups
    5. the formal classroom was never the space for deep critique precisely because it was not a place of love
    6. if we argue that state violence is merely a manifestation of anti-blackness because that is what we see and feel, we are left with no theory of the state and have no way of understanding racialized police violence in places such as Atlanta and Detroit, where most cops are black
    7. how can we embrace our students and acknowledge their pain while remaining wary of a culture that reduces structural oppression to misunderstanding and psychology?
    8. This is also why diversity and cultural-competency training are the most popular strategies for addressing campus racism. As if racism were a manifestation of our “incompetent” handling of “difference.”
    9. It is difficult to see this in a world where words such as trauma, PTSD, micro-aggression, and triggers have virtually replaced oppression, repression, and subjugation
    10. The triumph of liberal multiculturalism also meant a shift from a radical anti-capitalist critique to a politics of recognition. This means, for example, that we now embrace the right of same-sex couples to marry so long as they do not challenge the institution itself
    11. the programmatic adoption of diversity, inclusion, and multiculturalism vampirized the energy of a radical movement that began by demanding the complete transformation of the social order and the eradication of all forms of racial, gender, sexual, and class hierarchy
    12. Powerful as this might be, the solution to racism still is shifted to the realm of self-help and human resources
    13. Managing trauma does not require dismantling structural racism
    14. Resistance is our heritage. And resistance is our healing
    15. Violence was used not only to break bodies but to discipline people who refused enslavement
    16. But what sustained enslaved African people was a memory of freedom, dreams of seizing it, and conspiracies to enact it—fugitive planning, if you will
    17. the popularity of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Between the World and Me (2015), especially among black college students, rests on his singular emphasis on fear, trauma, and the black body
    18. reading black experience through trauma can easily slip into thinking of ourselves as victims and objects rather than agents
    19. anchors violence in their collective consciousness, produces fear and paranoia—wrapped elegantly in thrill—and shrouds the many ways capitalism, militarism, and racism are killing black and brown people
    20. While every generation of black Americans has experienced unrelenting violence, this is the first one compelled to witness virtually all of it, to endure the snuffing out of black lives in real time, looped over and over again, until the next murder knocks it off the news.
    21. Contrast this with black student protesters who appeal to the university to “repair a broken community,” to make students “feel safe, accepted, supported and like they belong,” and to remedy their sense of alienation through “intense ‘inclusion and belonging’ training for all levels of students, staff, faculty, and administration.”
    22. “It cannot be denied that the university is a place of refuge, and it cannot be accepted that the university is a place of enlightenment. In the face of these conditions one can only sneak into the university and steal what one can.”
    23. The authors advocate refuge in and sabotage from the undercommons, a subaltern, subversive way of being in but not of the university
    24. Less than two decades later, the United Coalition Against Racism, a student organization at the University of Michigan, established the Ella Baker – Nelson Mandela Center for Anti-Racist Education (BMC). The center was never conceived as a safe space for students of color but rather as a resource for anti-racist struggles “dedicated to the principle of thinking in order to act.”
    25. A smaller, more radical contingent of protesters is less sanguine about the university’s capacity to change. Rejecting the family metaphor, these students understand that universities are not walled off from the “real world” but instead are corporate entities in their own right. These students are not fighting for a “supportive” educational environment, but a liberated one that not only promotes but also models social and economic justice
    26. while trauma can be an entrance into activism, it is not in itself a destination and may even trick activists into adopting the language of the neoliberal institutions they are at pains to reject
    27. I challenge student activists to not cleave their activism from their intellectual lives or mistakenly believe that because the university does not offer them the education they crave, it is beyond their reach.
  3. Jun 2019
    1. But someone who sends pipe bombs to Democrats; plows through a crowd of anti-racism protesters in Charlottesville, Va.; or shoots up a church in Charleston, S.C., will not face domestic terrorism charges.

      I recall hearing this argument and believe it is true, but want to look for research it to verify that it is in fact true.

  4. Aug 2018
    1. It is a demand for whites to extend their historical imagination and recognize that the ills of racism are not the result of a few bad police officers or a few out-and-out racists in some far-off corner of America.

  5. Sep 2017
    1. homophobic

      Audre Lorde's essay, There is no Hierarchy of Oppressions, explains how any attack on Black lives also serves to be an attack on other marginalized identities through the concept of intersectionality.

      https://lgbt.ucsd.edu/education/oppressions.html

  6. Jul 2016
    1. Heroes of every color and creed who wear the uniform and risk their lives to keep passing down those blessings of liberty, police officers and the protesters in Dallas who all desperately want to keep our children safe.

      I don't know if anyone on my social media feeds caught this first go-round. This is her shout-out to Black Lives Matter activists who were protesting in Dallas where several police officers were murdered. She rejects framing of BLM as anti-police, making them peers with police with a shared interest in public safety. It's the kind of framing that many visible BLM activists have been trying to make in recent weeks. It's something to see it here, albeit with a very soft touch, on such a big stage.

    1. When you ask why such "bad" cops are  armed and allowed to patrol the streets, one begins to see that lurking beneath this violence is a fiscal menace.

      It is not fair to our cops to be under so much pressure! I am so relieved this article has pointed out the need to address the root of the problem, rather than simply get caught up in the tired "all lives matter" and so on take. This is very refreshing. I hope we all work to address this locally. Reduce fines. Reduce crime. Reduce the danger to our beloved force AND people. Do not expect them to become cash cows with their lives on the line. IMHO