5 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. Mel Brooks

      Here's his Wikipedia page. From it:

      Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky; June 28, 1926) is an American director, writer, actor, comedian, producer and composer. He is known as a creator of broad film farces and comedic parodies. Brooks began his career as a comic and a writer for Sid Caesar's variety show Your Show of Shows (1950–54) alongside Woody Allen, Neil Simon, and Larry Gelbart. Together with Carl Reiner, he created the comic character The 2000 Year Old Man. He wrote, with Buck Henry, the hit television comedy series Get Smart, which ran from 1965 to 1970.

      In middle age, Brooks became one of the most successful film directors of the 1970s, with many of his films being among the top 10 moneymakers of the year they were released. His best-known films include The Producers (1967), The Twelve Chairs (1970), Blazing Saddles (1974), Young Frankenstein (1974), Silent Movie (1976), High Anxiety (1977), History of the World, Part I (1981), Spaceballs (1987), and Robin Hood: Men in Tights (1993). A musical adaptation of his first film, The Producers, ran on Broadway from 2001 to 2007, and was remade into a musical film in 2005 by Brooks himself.

      In 2001, having previously won an Emmy, a Grammy and an Oscar, he joined a small list of EGOT winners with his Tony Award wins for The Producers. He received a Kennedy Center Honor in 2009, a Hollywood Walk of Fame star in 2010, the 41st AFI Life Achievement Award in June 2013, a British Film Institute Fellowship in March 2015, a National Medal of Arts in September 2016, and a BAFTA Fellowship in February 2017. Three of his films ranked in the American Film Institute's list of the top 100 comedy films of the past 100 years (1900–2000), all of which ranked in the top 15 of the list: Blazing Saddles at number 6, The Producers at number 11, and Young Frankenstein at number 13.

    2. Your Show Of Shows

      From the Wikipedia page:

      Your Show of Shows is a live 90-minute variety show that was broadcast weekly in the United States on NBC from February 25, 1950, through June 5, 1954, featuring Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca. Other featured performers were Carl Reiner, Howard Morris, Bill Hayes, baritone Jack Russell (singer), Judy Johnson, The Hamilton Trio and the soprano Marguerite Piazza. José Ferrer made several guest appearances on the series.

      In 2002, Your Show of Shows was ranked #30 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.[1] In 2013, it was ranked #37 on TV Guide's 60 Best Series of All Time.[2]

      In 2013, Your Show of Shows was ranked #10 on Entertainment Weekly’s Top 100 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.

  2. Dec 2017
    1. Brooks’ Law, which states “adding manpower to a late software project makes it later”

      S. McConnell adds an interesting take on this in his: Brooks' Law Repealed? article.

    1. Of another parcel of 153 acres near the former, and including a considerable eminence very favorable for the erection of a future observatory.

      In Thomas Jefferson's first visions for the University, he intended to include an observatory for the astronomy students to use. As designs and construction began, Jefferson's dream became illogical. At the time of Jefferson's death, UVa still did not have an observatory. In 1877, Leander McCormick donated a telescope and an observatory to the university, fulfilling Jefferson's dream for the University.

    2. James Breckenridge

      James Breckenridge was a revolutionary war veteran and a member of the US House of Representatives from Virginia. He was also an alumnus of the College of William and Mary. Breckenridge was a member of the commission that wrote the Rockfish Gap Report to determine the location and the bylaws for the University of Virginia. I was interested to learn that Breckenridge had a similar past to that of Thomas Jefferson, the founder of UVa. This got me to wondering whether Jefferson surrounded himself on the commission with like minded individuals to ensure that his visions for the university would be done. Breckenridge also had the honor of serving on the Board of Visitors for UVa until his death in 1833. For nearly fifteen years, Breckenridge was around and able to make his impact on the University.