357 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2017
    1. Although many adults believe that they have the right to consume any teen content that is functionally accessible, many teens disagree.

      If teens wanted to keep things from their parents, they shouldn't post it online... it's easy access for parents and everyone in general.

    2. Kids today. They have no sense of shame. They have no sense of privacy. They are show-offs, fame whores, pornographic little loons who post their diaries, their phone numbers, their stupid poetry

      This is not a false statement, I have seen many cases of this.

    3. Every teenager wants privacy. Every single last one of them, whether they tell you or not, wants privacy.

      This is a valid point, and they do deserve privacy in order to express themselves and find out who they are, but it's so much harder to do that now.

  2. Sep 2016
    1. Every teenager wants privacy. Every single last one of them, whether they tell you or not, wants privacy.”

      Every person wants privacy to a certain extent. As this quote does speak some truth this does refer to people of all ages. It also refers to different things people would want to keep private. We, according to myself at least, all want privacy for something and its fine because we are our own beings.

    2. Social media has introduced a new dimension to the well-worn fights over private space and personal expression.

      This is true. Because someone is more liked socially they receive backlash and hate when people realistically don't know how they are as a person. We choose whats posted and the results aren't always pretty. Its almost as if some of our freedom is also our enemy.

    3. No matter which style of speaking he chose, he knew he’d alienate some. He was right.

      This really shows how we all need to monitor what were saying. In any situation you can be alienating a person without realizing it. The faster you can open your mind to be more universal more may change for the better.

    4. In an effort to learn more about him, the committee members Googled him. They found his MySpace profile. It was filled with gang symbolism, crass language, and references to gang activities. They recoiled.

      Really proves that an employer will reject you due to what you're portraying yourself as online. Everyone is aware there is more than one side to a person. Therefore if the only side they see when they are looking into you is the negative what do you expect their thoughts of you will be?

    5. perhaps he imagined the audience of his MySpace profile to be his classmates, family, and community—not the college admissions committee

      Social media pages are like forms of entertainment to millenials, of course his target audience were his classmates. However, even with the instant publicity, millenials still crave a sense of privacy online which is a contradiction to the idea of social media. Hiding graphic or questionable images on your social media is a reason to make your profile private.

    6. Why would a student lie to an admissions commit-tee when the committee could easily find the truth online?

      Most college applicants tend to stretch the truth on their resumes as a result of overly competitive process. Getting into a somewhat prestigious school is no longer about having good grades; schools now look for well-rounded individuals.

  3. Jun 2016
    1. A “public” has no product, and there’s no call to work it all out here; but if we are committed to thinking about the digital world as a space that values diversity, minority viewpoints, and nondominant forms of expression, we need to make sure that the conversation is ongoing and open.

      I have always believed that open and honest discussion of important topics is necessary so they aren't just "swept under the rug."

    2. I’d like to refigure the OER movement to champion open, public networks as a learner-developed educational space. If textbooks and other learning materials are free and openly licensed, this fundamentally transforms the relationship of learners to their content, empowering faculty and students to shape knowledge

      Along with the effect this has on the student/teacher/topic relationship this would also have an incredible environmental impact. If we make the majority (if not all) of text books digital the access for students increases and the impact/destruction of forests for paper decreases.

    3. the public only works when the public is empowered to speak in ways that the structures that contain that public might not endorse or facilitate

      It seems like a chain effect happens here. Once someone in public speaks about the topic at hand, others either get to disagree or agree with the person's opinions then the public, hopefully, continually gets involved in the matter.

    4. empowering faculty and students to shape knowledge,

      i know if i didnt have to pay hundreds of dollars on text books it would be less stressful and more enjoyable

    5. As Sara Goldrick-Rab demonstrates, public spaces are fraught with danger and stomach-aches… but they are intimately connected to the vision many of us have for the public commons as an accessible, learner-driven space for diverse voices to share and create knowledge.

      I agree. Public spaces may cause some belly churning of nervousness and anxiety, but a soon as we take the "leap," they connect us into public areas that guide us to all diverse opinions to then connect with one another to create a higher set of knowledge.

    6. the public only works when the public is empowered to speak in ways that the structures that contain that public might not endorse or facilitate

      Sad to see that "public" thoughts and opinions aren't actually public.

    7. But what I think we could work for is the slow and deliberate carving out of a public digital space: not a fantasy space separate from our fucked-up world of haves and have-nots, but one that insists on the critical naming and challenging of silencing, exclusive, cruel, and oppressive structures.

      This is such a powerful statement.

    8. In my own Networks track, I realized at the end that a participant had dropped out halfway through the institute because the focus on Twitter was unhelpful to her and when she pushed at this, she felt that the group didn’t hear; her leaving meant that our “network” was reified into something less multifaceted than it could have been

      I get that we need to make sure everyone's voice is heard and every opinion taken into consideration, but why adjust the whole group because one felt a particular focus wasn't helpful to her?

    9. The challenge of being a public scholar is not just in being accountable for your words to a vast, diverse audience; it’s in being responsible for demanding that the vastness and diversity be preserved in the face of pressure to close it off for the profit or comfort of the elite.

      It is a challenge to say the right thing to keep everyone in a good mood when talking about certain issues, however they should be able to talk about the uncomfortable in hopes of trully understanding an issue at its core

    10. we’re aware of the risks that we take when we, as academics, venture to speak out on hot-button issues.

      i dont find it fair that teachers have to take a back road on their opinions because theyre teachers. just because theyre teachers they cant express what something means to them when it really hits a trigger spot.

    11. If textbooks and other learning materials are free and openly licensed, this fundamentally transforms the relationship of learners to their content

      I think this would allow students to be more involved and interested in the material they are learning. They don't need to focus their energy on the financial costs.

    12. The public is not just a place we might be willing to work in; it’s a place we must be willing to work at

      In order for us to have success, everyone must put their effort at working towards the public compared to just working in the inners of the project at hand, not focusing on the big picture at hand.

    13. Who doesn’t, on some level, want to get off Twitter, build a tiny house, and move to the unwired northern woods

      People either love social media or hate it. There really is no inbetween.

    14. while others were angry and hurt by how the real-world constructions of identity seeped into the track and prevented their full participation.

      Society greatly influences people's opinions.

    15. “open to the public,”

      people may know and read this saying but don't actually interpret it correctly such as posting some inappropriate things like nudity, etc which the people don't recall it being publicized and blame the world for their actions, not themselves

    16. hearing a story about how one tweet can threaten to undo a lifetime of promising work?

      social networks of all variety is like a double edge sword it can help the user and hurt him/her as well, because a thought or a personal oppion can be twisted into something offensive, all it takes is one persons reaction

    17. we’re aware of the risks that we take when we, as academics, venture to speak out on hot-button issues

      I think it is a shame that educators, and people in general, cannot speak their mind on their own personal social media accounts without facing severe backlash.

    18. Who doesn’t, on some level, want to get off Twitter, build a tiny house, and move to the unwired northern woods

      I wonder if many millennials can even?

      Image Description

  4. Feb 2016
    1. This idea of no shame is where kids get themselves into trouble. They post too much and put themselves in danger.

    2. Instead, she believes that she can achieve privacy by choosing what not to share

      Giving you the power over social media websites, if you don't post it, it remains private

    3. Many teens feel as though they’re in a no-win situation when it comes to sharing information online: damned if they publish their personal thoughts to public spaces, and damned if they create private space that parents can’t see.

      New age parent- child battles

    4. I came to realize that, taken out of context, what teens appear to do and say on social media seems peculiar if not outright problematic.

      Important to always remember that not everything you post is meant for everyone that may see it. You have to consider the fact that people you may not intend to see what you post, probably will.

    5. Why would a student lie to an admissions commit-tee when the committee could easily find the truth online?

      The idea to ask why and not immediately judge is important especially when looking at potential students and applicants.

    6. The idea that teens share too much—and therefore don’t care about privacy—

      There are people who post every little thing they do on the internet, some people really don't care. Somethings are better to keep to yourself.

    7. Interactions that were previously invisible to adults suddenly have traces, prompting parents to fret over conversations that adults deem inappropriate or when teens share “TMI” (too much information).

      A lot of people do post very inappropriate things thinking that this is okay, but if its online it never goes away.

    8. just like journalists and politicians, teens imagine the audience they’re trying to reach

      I never thought about it that way, but this is really true.

    9. perhaps he imagined the audience of his MySpace profile to be his classmates, family, and community—not the college admissions committe

      Sometimes people forget the fact that mostly everything is public, and future bosses and people can see it, they may see something they don't like on your profile and decide not to choose you. That is why you should always think about what you're going to post.

    10. In an effort to learn more about him, the committee members Googled him. They found his MySpace profile. It was filled with gang symbolism, crass language, and references to gang activities. They recoiled

      Sometimes someone's profile can be completely true about them, or sometimes it may all be a lie but the sad part is that either way, people will most likely believe what they read on the internet.

    11. Social media has affected the lives and practices of many people and will continue to play a significant role in shaping many aspects of American society.

      A lot of people, well most people perhaps, these days rely very much on social media.

  5. Jan 2016
    1. She wasn’t hiding her interests, but she had created a separate context—and thus a separate digital persona—for talking with fellow fans.

      I remember doing the same thing on Myspace with the show Lost. My friends weren't into it so I found groups on there to discuss theories and plot lines with fellow fans.

    2. Some people assume that these ebbs and flows mean radical changes in youth culture, but often the underlying practices stay the same even as the context shifts what is rendered visible and significant.

      I agree, as someone who was around for Myspace and its downfall and rise of Facebook, even though the sites were different, the ideas were same and the way they were used were similar. I see the same thing happening as kids switch to Snapchat.

    3. She’s choosing to represent herself in different ways on different sites with the expecta-tion of different audiences and different norms

      Unfortunately these days it is harder to do that as all the big soicial media sites continue to intertwine with each other.

    4. I was proud to be one of the children he spoke of who appeared “native” in the new civilization

      I was proud to be one of those children as well, exploring this "new frontier."

    5. Although Turkle recognized that a person’s identity was always tethered to his or her psyche, she left room for arguments that suggested that the internet could—and would—free people of the burdens of their “material”—or physically embodied—identities, enabling them to become a better version of themselves.

      I think that the opposite happened ore frequently. The internet allowed people to be the worst possible versions of themselves or be a completely different person, especially in the early years of the internet when people filled chatrooms and hid behind screen-names.

    6. Yet, on Facebook, this has proven to be intrac-table and confusing, given the complex and constantly changing pri-vacy settings on that site.6

      This is very true, in the years I have been on Facebook, they have changed privacy settings numerous times.

    7. my attempt to describe and explain the net-worked lives of teens to the people who worry about them—parents, teachers, policy makers, journalists, sometimes even other teens

      We need to think about the literary practices of teens

    1. Just like our first class this class will be production based. You will be making and building from the start.Throughout the class

      I use the word class way too much in these three sentences.

  6. Dec 2015
    1. Turkey

      To be able to network to all over the world and experience conversations by sitting in your chair or bed is simply amazing.

    2. Learning happens together

      Collaborations lead to even more spectacular ideas than ever thought of before!

    3. I started using social media in the classroom

      On the first day of my fieldwork, I noticed computers in the classrooms and time set aside for them to utilize it. When I was in school, there were very limited computers and hardly any of them worked.

    4. Connect with people in another part of the world

      When I participated in a Twitter chat, #spedchat, I noticed that most of the people involved in it was from Indiana compared to me being in little Connecticut. It was really fun to be able to connect to other special education future or current teachers.

    5. I encourage them to begin looking at other tools.

      I'm sorry but Shelly is teaching this to her 4 year old students....that takes a lot of patience and skill to teach such difficult lessons to youngsters. Great job Shelly!

    6. Learning happens together.

      There's no I in teamwork for a reason.

    7. more experienced educators.

      At first, I thought the author would want to learn from the most tech savviest social media experts aka teens because they grew up in a such a tech influenced generation. They are like the Einsteins when it comes to social media in my opinion.

    8. “the people you choose to connect with and learn from.”

      I love how she refers to them as passionate learning networks.

    9. #edchat

      I've participated in a similar chat called the #edtech chat on Twitter and learned an immense amount of information through it.

    10. “growing a personal learning network.

      Reminds me of what Prof. said about how he met other educators and tech people online.

    1. Google Docs.

      Honestly, my best friend for the past few years. All my group assignments are there and pictures and shared items.

    2. students can work collaboratively in groups

      More creative juices flowing!

    3. students can work collaboratively in groups

      More creative juices flowing!

    4. an efficient and effective means of describing a step-by-step process, explaining a particular concept,

      Allows for students to take their time and not feel rushed. They are able to rewind or fast forward to get all the necessary information.

    5. Good educational screencasts depend not only on thorough planning but also on thoughtful and careful editing to re-sequence lesson elements, eliminate awkward and unnecessary portions, and craft a focused, easy-to-follow presentation that uses students' time efficiently.

      For the past few years, I have been really working on my editorial skills with videos and formatting and editing is such a pain, but the pay off is beautiful.

    6. Blogging and YouTube

      How I have literally done anything.

    7. WMV (Windows Media video), MOV (QuickTime Movie), AVI (Audio Video Interleave video file), MP4 (iPod, iPhone), iTunes-compatible video, MP3 (audio only), GIF (animation file)

      Now I know what all these acronyms mean. And I will say again, there are so many acronyms in the new literacy world!!!

    8. Screencasts are excellent for those learners who just need an aural as well as a visual explanation of the content presented.

      Image Description TRUE

    9. The flipped teaching method — a blending of direct instruction with constructivist learning activities — can be integrated across many curriculum areas.

      Never heard of this theory before.

    10. Increases student engagement

      So important to make sure students are engaged throughout the lesson. Bored students don't learn!

    11. Google Docs.)

      Google docs have grown on me from the time I wrote a blog post this year about how much I hated the software :)

    12. Screencasts are an effective way to share ideas, deliver content, and obtain student feedback

      They are extremely effective in getting information across to people. I have used countless screencasts in my educational career for when I didn't understand something.

    13. Keep the screencast no more than 10–12 minutes.

      Prof. said how people lose interest after 7 minutes!

    1. I think with anything our identities are growing and transforming, hopefully, for the better. I wasn't the strongest reader when I was younger. I did well, because I knew how to pick out context clues. But as you grow older, context clues can help you find a connection but not the answer.

  7. networkedlearningcollaborative.com networkedlearningcollaborative.com
    1. low-income families

      These students might be connecting with each other, but we have learned that through our connections we can construct. Just because they are a part of low-income families does not mean their ideas and thoughts are beneath others.

    2. A form ofself-publishing, personal home pages also canbe viewed as online multimedia texts constructed through a process of ‘‘inclusion,allusion, omission, adaptation, and discovery’’ (para. 11) and shaped by one’sassociations, connections, and conventions in Web subcultures.

      There are stereotypes within the web subcultures that some people want to be a part of and others are just curious to look.

    3. A form ofself-publishing, personal home pages also canbe viewed as online multimedia texts constructed through a process of ‘‘inclusion,allusion, omission, adaptation, and discovery’’ (para. 11) and shaped by one’sassociations, connections, and conventions in Web subcultures.

      There are stereotypes within the web subcultures that some people want to be a part of and others are just curious to look.

    4. supporting young people’s interpersonal needs?

      For some it may be, but for others it could be damaging.

    5. ‘‘The cruelest irony of this public policy [No Child Left Behindlegislation in the U.S.]is that students who need to be prepared the most at school for an online age ofinformation, those who may not have Internet access at home, are precisely thosewho are being prepared the least’’

      And then the cycle continues, with the stereotypes and accusations. But if there is no help or resources provided, what does someone do who doesn't understand many things.

    6. andtheir uses of information and communication technologies, seen as separate fromschool-sanctioned practices

      I feel that this is because we have not taught our students when and what is the appropriate use of our technology

    7. ‘‘generationaldivide’’

      Sometimes it is hard for my family that times have changed and that their methods aren't always the correct ones

    8. The majority use MySpace (65%) with Facebook (37%) being the second mostpopular site,

      It would be interesting to see a more recent study, MySpace is definitely a dying SN.

    9. A study of U.S. college students (18 – 24) found 85% of respondents useSNSs, and most, on a daily basis to keep in touch with others (Salaway, Borreson,Nelson, 2008)

      I think if you were to collect the same data today, it would be a lot different. It seems to me that most students do not really use most social network sites as a form of communication, but as a form of expressing themselves. Social network sites have developed into an online diary with idea sharing. I also believe that the percentage of students utilizing SNs would be higher.

    10. andtheir uses of information and communication technologies, seen as separate fromschool-sanctioned practices.

      Cell phones, tablets, and laptops are not allowed in most high schools and middle schools which is crippling. There may be one or two assignments a year that involve gathering information online; but otherwise students are forced to use a dated form of learning. Limiting students seems almost silly when you consider the vast amount of information that they have sitting in their back-pockets which they are not allowed to use.

    11. Popular media accounts, however, tend toportray young people’s media practices as deficient or deleterious to academiclearning, often linking them to an ‘‘overriding sense of moral panic about decliningstandards of literacy’’ (Thurlow, 2006, para. 23) or a ‘‘threat to societal values’’(Herring, 2007, p. 4) without acknowledging the full complexity of students’experiences

      Often times social media is perceived as brain sucker. While it does have some negative effects it is also responsible for a lot of online learning. News is tweeted, images are created and posted, forums are available for discussion; however the common reputation is that social media is bad based on solely on the amount of time younger people spend on it.

    12. The majority use MySpace (65%) with Facebook (37%) being the second mostpopular site, and many students belong to more than one network

      MySpace is definitely not even close to 65% now.

    13. an online social network site (SNS) is a ‘‘web-based service that allows individuals to (1) construct a public or semipublic profilewithin a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they sharea connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those madeby others within the system’’

      Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest to only name a few... so many sites now that hit these requirements.

    14. MySpace (MS)

      This article is definitely from 2009....

    15. ‘The cruelest irony of this public policy [No Child Left Behindlegislation in the U.S.]is that students who need to be prepared the most at school for an online age ofinformation, those who may not have Internet access at home, are precisely thosewho are being prepared the least’’

      Couldn't agree more! So prevalent in the classroom I had my field placement in.

    16. print-based literacies, 21stcentury skills(Partnershipfor 21stCentury Skills, 2008) and digital literacies of online reading, writing, andcommunication

      a combination of all will lead to greater understanding.

    17. ‘‘generationaldivide’’

      Present between every generation. There's definitely one between my parents and my generation. More so with my grandparents.

    18. ‘‘threat to societal values’’

      My grandparents still believe this. They dislike the internet and its social media websites more than anything. I think its because they don't UNDERSTAND them or why they are used.

    1. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure

      Creating is the first step and then construction afterwards is to build and rebuild an idea to make it grow and prosper to a better and more focused idea.

    2. “identify, in textual terms, how the Internet mediates the representation of knowledge, the framing of entertainment, and the conduct of communication”,

      There are key differences in all of these and being able to identify them will help students recognize what they need and what they dont need.

    1. Writing can appear on the screen; but when it does it is subordinated to the logic of the image; just as image could appear on the page, though subordinated to the logic of writing.

      Maybe the image means a certain way for one student than it does for another. The image is used to evoke feeling along with the words and it would be useful to even ask students what the image on a presentation means to them.

    2. It might be the medium of the teacher’s body, involving speech, movement and gesture

      For a project, I sang about the Drug ABC's while my friend signed the words. The students appreciated our lively and different method to gather their attention.

    3. Wherever I place it, someone looking at the image is entitled to assume that the nucleus actually is where I have placed it in the circle/cell – whether I intended to or not, or whether it actually belongs there or not.

      It looks like an unfinished hamster or bunny, perhaps. Some colors would be helpful to distinct cell from nucleus.

    1. The changing nature of work and life make it essential now to prepare students to transcend a simple, factual level of understanding and actually use information in creative and innovative ways to develop new ideas and solve complex problems

      Yes.

    2. Communicating effectively to others with digital technologies

      Many people complain about the new technological advances, but it is only if they are not used in the appropriate and intended use. We want our children to use new literacies as a resource instead of pushing it aside, like we should for temple run.

    3. Because employees at lower levels of the organization tended to simply follow directions, they were not required to possess or use higher level thinking skills or digital literacies

      But who is to say that they do not have ideas and plans that could better our system.

    4. However, this approach wasted large amounts of intellectual capital within an organization, limited innovation, and, as a result, failed to maximize either creativity or productivity.

      Through this, we are able to connect with almost everybody and collaborate with them. There is no more he said, she said, they said. It is all in one network and the information is blooming throughout employees, schools, etc.

    5. today does not necessarily ensure that one will be fully literate tomorrow since new technologies will always appear, regularly requiring additional new literacies

      Which is why it is called NEW LITERACIES! Wow. Because it is constantly changing and new everyday. This is exciting. I also do not think that one can be fully literate. There is so much to learn and immerse yourself in.

    6. we live in new times, with new literacies.

      I thought New Literacies had to do with new readings. Essentially, it is. New ways to comprehend literature in a way the advances all the time.

    1. Performance-based assessments provide more diagnos-tic information than do many other types of assessments, for they are administered while students perform an authentic task.

      Well, what is our necessary task. Do we want to teach our children how to find keywords and only keywords? There should be other resources to help students understand different types of context around what they are reading.

    2. As we begin to integrate these online communication tools into our classrooms, we should not ignore concerns about child safety.

      Not only should we be concerned about child safety, but we could also be using this time to educate our students about our safety concerns. We do not want to scare them away from technology, but we would like them to be aware of their surroundings.

    3. . Keyword entry in a search engine

      Bingo

    4. How does the nature of reading and writing change online?

      Control F is your best friend. The change has allowed us to narrow in on what we are searching for directly. Instead of reading an entire text, keywords are best to find the answer.

    5. New Literacies, as the broader concept, benefits from work taking place in the multiple, lowercase dimensions of new literacies by identify-ing the common findings that appear.

      I like the capital New Literacies for the broader concept because the proper noun reminds us that it is the bigger picture, the umbrella in which everything falls under.

    6. conceptualizes literacy at low-ercase (new literacies) and uppercase (New Literacies) levels

      This is a wonderful method and is sure to not confuse others. I suppose it to be the best option. We shall carry on.

    1. Our school systems’ inability to close this participation gap has negative consequences for everyone involved.

      The school I worked with was sure to include updated software and activities for the students to actively participate in. They made for positive development and it was not a stressful atmosphere.

    2. Today’s children learn through play the skills they will apply to more serious tasks later. The challenge is how to connect decisions made in the context of our everyday lives with the decisions made at local, state, or national levels.

      Children need their time during recess and specials to interact and grow from one another. When taken way at young ages, they will never have the opportunity to grow with their peers and experience these essentials emotions and skills.

    3. podcasting, game modding, or machinima. Nor did it count other forms of creative expression and appropria-tion, such as music sampling in the hip-hop community. These activities are highly technological, but they use tools and tap production and distribution networks neglected in the Pew study.

      Which is quite the shame, because this is where the real live action begins. Nothing staged or rehearsed, just pure creativity spewing from these people. The best things come from spontaneity and building off of that spontaneity

    4. . members who believe that their contributions matter, and5. members who feel some degree of social connection with one another (at the least, they care what other people think about what they have created).

      Our audience plays a huge role to what we are creating, whether we like it or not. If we do not have a purpose to a post or a connection to the community how will we get the word out, who will listen?

    5. more than half of all American teens—and 57 percent of teens who use the Internet—could be consid-ered media creators.

      "Media creators" it's exciting to know that my finger tips and the other 57% of teens' fingertips have the ability to share and create from their mind to their fingertips to the world

    6. —learning how to campaign and govern; how to read, write, edit, and defend civil liberties; how to pro-gram computers and run a business; how to make a movie and find distribution—

      All we have to teach in schools is common core. We could also be teaching common skills for our future students to venture into the unknown and build a community independently, but still asking for help along the way

  8. Nov 2015
    1. Every specific literacy that you know today will change repeatedly and substantially during your lifetime.

      Not only will literacies change but how we use them. Handwriting is a Literacy that is on its way to extinction. The ability to write (especially in cursive) is a diminishing skill being replaced by Typing. Granted Typing offers the same way of transmitting thought as writing however it is a Literacy skill that is drastically changing in its importance and relevance to modern society. I ask my swimmers to write out goals and most choose to submit them to me through email since they writing skills are essentially non existent. Often times I wish the kids that do submit them in writing would type them because I can barely read their chicken scratch scribbles.

    1. This requires a new set of reading skills to detect clickbaiting, astro turfing, and real grass root efforts. Accomplishing these goals requires readers to put a much larger emphasis on not only sourcing skills but also analytics.

      As a history major sourcing is always relevant to to my studies especially research papers. Since the evolution of the internet, sourcing has become considerably harder in terms of making sure that the content being used is credible. With the introduction of sites like Wikipedia knowledge and truth become questionable making it as hard to find correct information as it used to find information at all. The common phrase "dont believe everything you read" is still pertinent however now its "don't believe ANYTHING you read on the internet...unless properly sourced..."

    2. Design matters

      In school we often take the creativity out of the classroom. I think that allowing students to use more than just their regurgitation skills is vital. Most of the time the focus is on comprehension and summaries, but the process of creation is often left out. Design is such an important part of presentation.

    3. I have argued that analytics is the most important literacy skill that no one is teaching.

      I did not properly learn how to analyze information until my sophomore year of college. Up until then I was simply paraphrasing and summarizing information. K-12 should incorporate more challenging of ways of understanding text.

    4. They seemed to hold more information in their working memories that they could later mold into new meanings. They could quickly use the information they read and check it against their understanding of texts they visit in three or four clicks.

      Retaining the information you read and cross-checking with various other sources gives you a better understanding of the information you are handling while also giving you the ability to check reliability and meaningfulness.

    5. I can teach students to write argumentative essays in online environments but I could never account for the impact of design using pencil and paper.

      The basic of the basics...

    6. We looked at three websites about Mumia Abu-Jamal, a Philadelphia man who contests his death row conviction of killing a police officer.

      Nice subject! Image Description

    7. By examining how an idea travels, the frequency of times readers and authors mention an idea, and tracing it back to its source all require analytics.

      Funny story about someone hating on analytics:

      I was conducting a business deal with a vendor a few months back. After doing some research and finding little to no feedback/reviews outside of their own personal website on the net; I mentioned this to them during a meeting. They proceeded to tell me that "reviews on Google, Yelp, etc. are all analytics..." with their tone suggesting that analytics are not important...

      Needless to say, I didn't go with that vendor...

    8. Few students could identify an author let alone evaluate other markers of credibility.

      I've noticed that I started to look up the authors for our readings this semester. Maybe it was trying to put links in my blogs, but I have looked up some of the author's twitter pages....

      Isn't there a few of the authors that are following our class on hypothes.is and Twitter?

    9. A lack of background knolwedge did not phase skilled readers. This I documented in my work as very few students knew much about the domain of my inquiry tasks (American Revolution).

      Can't this section be the quintessential definition of what 'research' is? Personally, I never discuss subject matter of any type without some sort of personal background knowledge conducted.

    10. Skilled online readers engage in strategic text assembly which I define as the ability to read for meaning while flexibly applying both navigation strategies and comprehension monitoring strategies.

      Click links, open tabs, find multiple sources with a few clicks of the mouse, etc....

      Pretty much, be a PC multitasker Image Description

    11. For Kaku intelligence should be a mark of how divergent thinking allows some to create more complex models and more frequent simulations of the future.

      Thinking "differently" or "outside-the-box" was sort of frowned upon when I served in the military. I think this is why military culture seems "stuck in the past"...

      And probably why I believed some of my leaders weren't very intelligent...

    12. Human consciousness involves the ability to create a model of the world and then simulate the model of the world in order to obtain a goal.

      Our consciousness definitely separates us from primates in the intelligence scale... We can build more complex schemas in, what is essentially, our versions of the world...

    13. “mindless blogger.”

      Before I started blogging myself, I felt that if anyone saw my posts this is what I would be labeled as. However, the blogging world is so much bigger than I could have ever imagined. You can blog about ANYTHING and find someone with a common interest.

    14. We must teach students greater sourcing skills

      I remember citing sources being so stressful in school. I never wanted to cite something wrong in fear of plagiarism so I would only cite one or two solid sources.

    15. Basically socially complex texts are authored by opposing forces discussing an issue with equal passion and often mutual disdain.

      Passion is usually the spark for intense discussions and debates. I always feel the need to defend someone or something I care about.

    16. . They seemed to hold more information in their working memories that they could later mold into new meanings.

      My working memory helps me immensely when I researching for papers and projects.

    17. The students who could manage multiple tabs, navigate search engines, and move between multiple sources did better.

      Some people believe that multitasking leads to a lower quality of work. I can multitask certain things such as listening to music and writing a paper at the same time and I feel that I have done a good job.

    18. manipulate and mold information to achieve a higher goal”

      the ability to take information and create a meaning out of it to achieve something else.

    19. New and more complex skills and practices are required to read in online environments.

      Very prevalent when we think of our parents and grandparents who didn't develop these skills at such a young age like we did. Generational gap.

    20. Just 2% of code separates us from our Chimpanzee brethren.

      Shocking really to think that only 2% of coding separates humans from chimpanzees.

    21. Just seeing my words in that beautiful font and layout makes me feel like a real writer and not a “mindless blogger.”

      That's exactly how I feel when I blog on withknown when I can personalize it to be my own such like usually watercolored background and gifs relating to the subject matter I am discussing. zIt makes me believe that my writing is mine

    22. Basically socially complex texts are authored by opposing forces discussing an issue with equal passion and often mutual disdain.

      Socially complex texts remind me of debates in during class discussion or even political elections but it's online compared to live tv and in the classroom setting.

    23. I asked students to identify authors, evaluate an author’s expertise, evaluate a publisher, evaluate bias, and evaluate sources within a source.

      being able to decipher these things about a text could be crucial in deciding whether or not the source is credible to use for research. If the text doesn't have any of these things that are credible then you could make an argument in your research about how the source is not credible and does not support your research

    24. working memory.

      what is the definition of working memory? does it relate to learning something in that moment and remembering it to use for further research?

    25. navigational skills was a key difference between successful online readers and those who could not accomplish an inquiry task.

      if not proficient in navigating the media in question or being able to find the necessary information then the task at hand will never get done and information will be lost

    26. manipulate and mold information to achieve a higher goal

      skilled readers take what they have read and interpret it in other means to assist in accomplishing what is meant by reading the material in the first place

    27. New and more complex skills and practices are required to read in online environments.

      it's honestly personally really difficult for me to read anything online and i always prefer to get an actual copy of something because i feel like i can focus better, but i think this class really helped with this skill and i fell I'm a stronger online reader because of it

    28. Yes those students who have the prerequisite social practices to succeed in traditional academic reading tasks do outperform peers in online reading environments.

      In middle school i had a teacher who always told us that readers make better writers, so supposedly if you have an advantage in reading then subsequently you're a better writer.

    1. , the Internet provides individuals with opportunities to make their personal lives richer and more fulfillin

      We have a wider opportunity fuel our goals on the internet, such as fighting for rights (petitions), or as the reading states; advocating for social justice, managing a medical crisis, and so on...

    2. Today, global economic competition requires that organizations abandon these traditional command-and-control structures and instead harness all of their intellectual capital, unleash innovation and creativity, and generate greater productivity

      I like this sentence because we are able to use the current ways in the workplace without the competition of higher thinking and learning. We would be able to work with the advanced way of thinking and learning.

    3. Because employees at lower levels of the organization tended to simply follow directions, they were not required to possess or use higher level thinking skills or digital literacie

      Is this what the sentence in the beginning was talking about? Those on higher levels of the organization use new digital literacies and have a higher level of thinking process.

    4. the literacy demands in the workplace have changed because the organization of workplace settings has changed

      Can this be worded differently? I'm confused on what this is saying about the workplace.

    5. , continually generates new technologies for information and communication, repeatedly requiring new literacies (

      Learned this throughout the course, using all the new tools and websites I have never heard of before.

    6. (ORCA)

      Image Description

    7. As the ORCA Project continues and as we learn more about the assessment of online research and comprehension, we are likely to discover additional limitations that are equally important. Nevertheless, the current assessments provide a useful starting point to understanding the assessment of online research and comprehension within authentic, performance-based tasks.

      I hope one day, I can see the ORCA Project be a reality and be used everyday in schools to understand how efficiently students can use the internet in research and comprehension.

    8. How Are We Doing?

      I read this title fast and all I thought of was Joey from Friends....Image Description

    9. Keyword entry in a search engine, for example, becomes an important new literacy skill because search engines are an important new technology for locating information.

      I really do enjoy some search engines such as Google using each word I put in the engine, it has suggestions of what I may be searching for. It makes it easier and most times, more successful for my research.

    10. use information in creative and innovative ways to develop new ideas and solve complex problems

      I like to think I do this when it comes to my blog posts. I always to make the reader feel like they are sitting with me, talking about the subject matter. I also try to include gifs or images to engage the reader in my material. Without this course, I wouldn't know how to post such things.

    11. for example, Internet use in U.S. workplaces increased by nearly 60% among all employed adults 25 years of age and older (U.S. Department of Commerce, 2002)

      I defiantly think in the past 13 years, this statistic had to have increased.

    12. Today, global economic competition requires that organizations abandon these traditional command-and-control structures and instead harness all of their intellectual capital, unleash innovation and creativity, and generate greater productivity.

      I'm so happy that I live and work in the current day to be able to work with the most advanced way of thinking and learning. Image Description

    13. we mean that literacy is not just new today; it becomes newevery day of our lives.

      Besides literacy, life also becomes new everyday. We never know what today or tomorrow will bring.

    14. we live in new times, with new literacies.

      definitely found this out by taking this course....

    1. There are things you can do with sound that you cannot do with graphic substance, either easily or at all; not even imitate all that successfully graphically

      Distinguishing meaning trough voice inflections and tone can not be done so easily in the form of written word as opposed to orally. There are certain things you can do one, but you cannot do with the other, even though both can require the use of words.

  9. Oct 2015
    1. Students who succeed in online environments skimmed more websites and spent more time engaged with sources when they judged them to be relevant.

      Skimming is like a word search, in order to find out about a subject, I scan through the source to see any keywords then read on and skip the spots that don't necessarily relate to the subject.

    2. The students who could manage multiple tabs

      I could manage multiple tabs but defiantly get annoyed with having so many tabs open that aren't particularly necessary at that moment of time. It's just one of my pet peeves.

    3. how divergent thinking allows some to create more complex models and more frequent simulations of the future.

      Divergent thinking has made me experience new ways of expressing myself in a more intricate way in my tasks such like blog posting. I try to make it more inviting and expressive of how I actually am compared to typical blogging.

    4. New and more complex skills and practices are required to read in online environments.

      I really thought I was going to struggle in this particular class because I'm not a huge reader of online articles, etc but I feel as though I actually started to comprehend more than I have before. I think it's due to the repetition of reading two articles a module.

    5. Two percent. Just 2% of code separates us from our Chimpanzee brethren.

      It's still pretty remarkable that we are just 2% different in our DNA coding that separates us from Chimpanzee brethren.

    1. I am attracted by “Grille”; I am aware that I am particularly drawn by the “e” on “Grille”

      this reminds me of several different words such as gray being spelt grey or even adding a u in the word color.

    2. Wherever I place it, someone looking at the image is entitled to assume that the nucleus actually is where I have placed it in the circle/cell – whether I intended to or not, or whether it actually belongs

      what would also help would be to add an actual picture of a cell rather than an artists representation, so people have a realistic expectation about what a cell would look like

    3. I will have to say “Every cell has a nucleus”. If I use an image, I will need to place a large dot somewhere in the circle which indicates the cell to represent the nucleus (Figure 1).

      drawing a picture of this subject will most likely help a lot people rather than just stating the fact.

    4. The teacher had given two additional instructions: ”put your writing at the top of the page, and the drawing at the bottom”, and “use only black pencils in your drawing”. Apart from the different responses to this instruction (7 b used colour pencils) there is the startling difference in what each “saw” and what each wrote.

      Limited options can drastically change how we create. They can also drastically change how we view subjects.

    5. All these are social meanings, specific to a particular culture. At the same time they are chosen, put together for their potential to mean, by the deliberate action of the designer. The sign - a complex message of words, of letters, of colour and font-types with all their cultural resonances - reflects the interests of its designer as much as the designer’s imagined sense of those who will see and read the sign. The sign is based on a specific rhetorical purpose, and intent to persuade with all means possible those who pass by and notice it.

      I would call this consumer behavior because once you see how the public reacts, you'll adjust or keep what you have to better promote yourself.

    6. Semiotics takes the sign - a fusion of a form and a meaning – as its basic unit. In making signs we –embedded in our cultures - select forms in such a way that they expresses the meanings that we ‘have’ always ‘aptly’; hence signs always express, through their form, the meanings that the makers of signs have wished to make.

      Now would the "hang loose" sign be considered a semiotic?

    7. Wherever I place it, someone looking at the image is entitled to assume that the nucleus actually is where I have placed it in the circle/cell – whether I intended to or not, or whether it actually belongs there or not. Each mode forces me into making certain kinds of commitments about meaning, intended or not. The choice of mode has profound effects on meaning, and textbook designers, for instance, need to be aware of such meaning effects of different modes.

      Reading this quote over and over again makes me realize that people really do nit pick such things to no end because that's how things can be learned or argued about.

    8. The kinds of meanings made by the letter “e”, by the word “Grille”, and by the colour “red” are different kinds of meanings. Not only do they mean different things, they mean differently. You can’t look up the meaning of “e”, nor the meaning of “lurid red”. What “e” does is not so much refer to some object, such as a Grill, or a Bar, but rather to evoke by cultural associations. It has a history of use in particular places (in ‘marketing speak’ for instance), and it is knowing its provenance that gives it its meaning. “e” puts me in the world of ‘Olde England’ with all its mythic associations. In one sense, colours work similarly: I have encountered the colour ‘red’ in many instances, as in “red light district”, as a colour of lipsticks: so in this context it is eroticized. Words have their histories, but they also refer; they name things (as nouns) or actions (as verbs) or attributes (as adjectives) or as relations of location (as prepositions), and so on

      Shakespeare was a master linguist. He would take words that meant one thing and used them in a context to mean something completely different...

      The "little death"...

    9. It might be the medium of the teacher’s body, involving speech, movement and gesture.

      Tried this with a student I was working with during my observations for another EDU class. The student, who is on and IEP and is a special learner, better understood the concept of the equator and the prime meridian when I drew a huge "air circle" with my . hand and arm and swiped in the direction for each. e.g. I would draw a huge circle in the air and slice across it horizontally for the equator. I would see the student do the same action to himself during the test on the subject.

    10. To reflect on this: in writing or speaking I have to use a sentence in which two entities – cell and nucleus – are related by a verb, have, indicating a possessive relation: the cell has something (much like: “I have a car, a house, two kids, etc”). I could use a different verb: “In every cell there is a nucleus”. The meaning is now quite different: about existence, there is and location, in

      Not trying to get off track, but looking into this deeper; we can see how a few words or variations of voice dictation in conversation can be misconstrued or taken out of context. The common phrase: "That came out wrong... Let me rephrase..." often follows misunderstood phrases or voice dictations.

      Image Description

    11. There are things you can do with sound that you cannot do with graphic substance, either easily or at all; not even imitate all that successfully graphically.

      Where context of written word comes in. I can say "That's awesome!" and truly mean it or it can be sarcastically said in a demeaning way. Spoken speech is easier to distinguish.

    12. Words have their histories

      Very true. Some words will be forever linked to past historical meanings.

    13. I am attracted by “Grille”; I am aware that I am particularly drawn by the “e” on “Grille”.

      Just had a discussion about this with my sister the other day. Also, "shoppe" instead of "shop."

    14. the “social” in “Social Semiotics” draws attention to the fact that meanings always relate to specific societies and their cultures, and to the meanings of the members of those cultures.

      Different cultures and societies have different meanings for similar words.

    15. from the perspective of multimodality, which deals with all the means we have for making meanings – the modes of representation - and considers their specific way of configuring the world

      Drawing out a nucleus of a cell instead of stating what it looks like does lead to better understanding.

    16. from the constellation of mode of writing and medium of book / page, to the constellation of mode of image and medium of screen

      Writing vs. media platforms

    1. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure.

      I think there is also an element of Synthesis in this type of learning. Although new much of this content is several other ideas brought together to make a new tool. This is also construction however can be deemed as construction without precedent.

    2. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure

      I see how both of these words seem to mean the same thing but putting the definitions alongside each word, it's now noticeable that they are similar but not exactly alike.

    3. (ORC)

      Why is there just so many acronyms involved in New Literacies? Image Description

    4. But, most importantly, they are to use the expertise of other students and the teacher in the classroom.

      Going back to "being proud"; this also means being humble. We can't be shy or afraid to ask for help.

      This is not only a lesson for educators and students...

      But a lesson in life...Image Description

    5. Construction is equal parts inspiration and perspiration. Construction calls on creativity as well as persistence, flexibility, and revision. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      Teaching students to take pride in their work, no matter how they themselves see it, will motivate them and make them feel as their creation and work is being heard... Having pride in your work will only make you work harder towards your goal!Image Description

    6. to try and consolidate the great work in visual, digital, and multimodal content construction…while making it easy & flexible enough for teachers to make this work happen in their classrooms.

      ,I'm all about easy-access for educators and teachers in creating digital work. I'm also about having students use tech in order to learn and create... But, in reality, outside of colleges and "well-off" schools; how easy is it to really pull this off? Sure, it's easy for educators who are already adults who already possess the tools necessary to make this work happen, but what about the students and schools who have little to no access to any type of digital access to create visual, digital and multimodal content construction? We also have to take into consideration the politics in academia that have and are constantly hindering any progress in this area...Image Description

    7. It may be a small designation to make, but I see a great deal of difference between the act of creation, and the sustained, informed, evaluative elements embedded in construction.

      Construction and creation are two very different aspects of online learning. The act constructing something from nothing is seen as different than producing.

    8. Construction asks our students and teachers to focus on the power and patience employed during work process…and not just the final resultant work product.

      Valuable lessons from the online construction process can help students become more creative in other aspects of their studies.

    9. Creation can be viewed simply as the act of producing, or causing to exist.  Construction is the building or assembling of an infrastructure.

      Creation vs. construction. I always assumed they were the same thing.

    10. our understanding of construction and creation needs to be broad enough to allow for change in the future.

      Online construction, along with many other forms of education, evolve and individuals need to be open to such changes.

    11. Working online is a fluid experience which calls for flexible learners.

      Couldn't agree more.

    12. while making it easy & flexible enough for teachers to make this work happen in their classrooms.

      I think this would allow students to learn exponentially in the classroom.

    13. the creativity, composition, and design skills students need

      Aspects that I feel aren't taught in typical "computer classes" at school.

    14. online collaborative inquiry, and online content construction 

      Two every important aspects of online learning, collaboration with others and construction of one's own work.

    1. In speech as in writing we use words. Yet only that for which there is a word can be brought into communication: no word, no communication about it. In image, if there is something that we wish to depict, we can depict whatever we want. We don’t ask: ”Is there an appropriate image we can use?” Contrary to common sense assumptions about language, words are vague.

  10. networkedlearningcollaborative.com networkedlearningcollaborative.com
    1. Changes in media, from page to screen, make ‘‘it easy to use a multiplicity ofmodes...in particular the mode of image – still or moving – as well as other modes,such as music and sound’’ to convey one’s message.

      That's exactly why I always engage the use of gifs in my each of my Witknown blog posts because it helps to express what I am trying to say in an easier way.

    2. we as educators need to move beyondcustomary views of these media as simply curriculum-delivery devices, teaching aidsor ‘‘neutral’’ tools for learning (p. viii) to find ways of engaging with them morecritically and creatively as ways ofrepresentingthe world, ofcommunicating,and associalandculturalprocesses

      I stated back in a previous annotation from Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture where newly hired teachers I know made a custom fundraising website (gofundme.com) to raise money to purchase new technologies in order to better their students' learning.

    3. hyperpersonal,even more friendly, social, and intimate than face-to-facecommunication

      I always thought that interpersonal interactions on the internet was very antisocial so this is news to me.

    4. boyd (2006), however, describes how the meaning of ‘‘Friend’’ connections inMySpace differs from traditional conceptualizations of ‘‘friendship’’ offline. Withinsocial network sites ‘‘Friendship’’ can mean a variety of different relationships (

      I agree with Boyd because I can be friends with thousands of people via SNS due to knowing one another from education, etc but actually be friends with someone on a physical and emotional level in real life.

    5. A form ofself-publishing, personal home pages also canbe viewed as online multimedia texts constructed through a process of ‘‘inclusion,allusion, omission, adaptation, and discovery’’ (para. 11) and shaped by one’sassociations, connections, and conventions in Web subcultures.

      I believe the Withknown blog I made for my EDU16 class is a form of self-publishing and it does make me feel a lot more intelligent on the internet.

    6. The majority use MySpace (65%) with Facebook (37%) being the second mostpopular site,

      I'm thinking that those numbers have now flipped flopped because having a Facebook profile seems to be a lot more popular among others I know compared to having a MySpace profile.

    7. The majority use MySpace (65%) with Facebook (37%) being the second mostpopular site,

      I'm thinking that those numbers have now flopped because having a Facebook profile seems to be a lot more popular among others I know compared to having a MySpace profile.

    8. devoting an average of 9 hours

      I feel as though that average amount of hours has increased since this paper was written in 2009.

    9. An important goal of this paper is to articulate how the insightsfrom this research might help us make education more engaging for all studentsand more meaningful to their present and future lives in a technologically mediatedworld.

      This social experiment makes me want to test it again for possibly finding out new results due to the boost in social media and online environments over the past 6 years for when this was first done in 2009.