9 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. These outcomes and estimated effect sizes bring us back to a key applied question: Which method—longhand (on paper or eWriter) or laptop—should students use to take notes? At this point, we would argue that the available evidence does not provide a definitive answer to this question.
  2. Mar 2018
  3. Jan 2018
  4. Dec 2017
  5. Aug 2017
    1. The biggest difference between CPUs now and CPUs then is the difference in power consumption between idle/sleep and full power - e.g. a 66MHz 486 consumes <5W at full power (and not much difference when halted) vs. ~5W at idle and close to 100W for a recent Haswell i7.
  6. Jul 2016
    1. None of us, students and faculty included, have really figured out how to live, learn, and work in the emerging digital media-cognitive ecology. So it is certainly true that we can struggle to accomplish various purposes with technologies pulling us in different directions

      What could educators do to better prepare students to interact with digital media that leverages tech to go far beyond what paper and pen affords (tools, skills, etc.)?

  7. May 2016
    1. The West Point study has lessons even for those whose baccalaureate days are far behind them. This is yet more evidence that multitasking doesn’t work. Beware of people who take laptops into meetings — even “just to take notes.” They’re probably not listening to you.

      That's very true. As more and more evidence comes out to support this, it is imperative that schools with 1-to-1, or planning to go that way, are mindful of when and where technology is integrated.