5 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. The kind of participatory connected learning experiences that we are advocating for arenot easily described

      What are some ways we who seem to "grok" participatory connected learning (or think we do) can make this concept more accessible to colleagues who lament the failure of "sit-and-get" faculty development/PD, but don't know what to do next? I was reminded of this a few days ago in a "mixed" meeting of faculty, staff, and administrators. We all meant well, but could have done better in planning some upcoming sessions that (we hope) will become a Community of Practice. I think a way to describe participatory culture in a room full of people who don't already know Henry Jenkins and Mimi Ito would help.

  2. Jan 2016
    1. Digital technology has evolved quickly from personal computers and networks to participatory social, academic, and political Web 2.0 environments with a new vocabulary and new temporal and spatial interactions.

      resulting from characteristics of participatory cultures as outlined by Henry Jenkins (Jenkins, Purushotma, Weigel & Clinton (2009), in their book Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture: Media Education for the 21st Century, outline the features of a participatory culture.) e.g. low barriers to artistic expression or civic engagement, informal membership, members feel socially connected

    1. New forms of collaboration made possible by the digital medium sharpen the theoretical question of how explanatory authority is established.

      This is really the most interesting aspect of annotation and the digital humanities (to me at least). And it's not really addressed here. The unlimited space of writing online is less of a problem/potential than the lack of limits on who participates in the conversation.

      It'd be interesting to see an academic treatment of reputation systems online and how they do or don't promote democratic knowledge production.

  3. Sep 2015
  4. Nov 2014
    1. If we believe in equality, if we believe in participatory democracy and participatory culture, if we believe in people and progressive social change, if we believe in sustainability in all its environmental and economic and psychological manifestations, then we need to do better than slap that adjective “open” onto our projects and act as though that’s sufficient or — and this is hard, I know — even sound.