33 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2021
    1. Here’s where immutability comes in: if you’re passing props into a PureComponent, you have to make sure that those props are updated in an immutable way. That means, if they’re objects or arrays, you’ve gotta replace the entire value with a new (modified) object or array. Just like with Bob – kill it off and replace it with a clone. If you modify the internals of an object or array – by changing a property, or pushing a new item, or even modifying an item inside an array – then the object or array is referentially equal to its old self, and a PureComponent will not notice that it has changed, and will not re-render. Weird rendering bugs will ensue.
    2. An easy way to optimize a React component for performance is to make it a class, and make it extend React.PureComponent instead of React.Component. This way, the component will only re-render if its state is changed or if its props have changed. It will no longer mindlessly re-render every single time its parent re-renders; it will ONLY re-render if one of its props has changed since the last render.
    1. connect is pure connect automatically makes connected components “pure,” meaning they will only re-render when their props change – a.k.a. when their slice of the Redux state changes. This prevents needless re-renders and keeps your app running fast.
    1. My personal summary is that new context is ready to be used for low frequency unlikely updates (like locale/theme). It's also good to use it in the same way as old context was used. I.e. for static values and then propagate updates through subscriptions. It's not ready to be used as a replacement for all Flux-like state propagation.
    2. One problem with the "Context vs Redux" discussions is that people often actually mean "I'm using useReducer to manage my state, and Context to pass down that value". But, they never state that explicitly - they just say "I'm using Context". That's a common cause of the confusion I see, and it's really unfortunate because it helps perpetuate the idea that Context "manages state"
    3. We can even say that server caching tools like React-Query, SWR, Apollo, and Urql fit the definition of "state management" - they store initial values based on the fetched data, return the current value via their hooks, allow updates via "server mutations", and notify of changes via re-rendering the component
    4. createContext() was designed to solve that problem, so that any update to a value will be seen in child components even if a component in the middle skips rendering.
    1. The Redux FAQ has some rules of thumb to help decide whether state should go in Redux, or stay in a component.In addition, if you separate your state by domain (by having multiple domain-specific contexts), then the problem is less pronounced as well.
    2. but in a more practical scenario, you often suffer from "death by a thousand cuts" which means that there's not really a single place that's slow, so you wind up applying React.memo everywhere. And when you do that, you have to start using useMemo and useCallback everywhere as well (otherwise you undo all the work you put into React.memo). Each of these optimizations together may solve the problem, but it drastically increases the complexity of your application's code and it actually is less effective at solving the problem than colocating state because React does still need to run through every component from the top to determine whether it should re-render. You'll definitely be running more code with this approach, there's no way around that.
  2. Jan 2021
  3. Nov 2020
    1. Frontend frameworks are a positive sum game! Svelte has no monopoly on the compiler paradigm either. Just like I think React is worth learning for the mental model it imparts, where UI is a (pure) function of state, I think the frontend framework-as-compiler paradigm is worth understanding. We're going to see a lot more of it because the tradeoffs are fantastic, to where it'll be a boring talking point before we know it.
  4. Oct 2020
    1. Recoil defines a directed graph orthogonal to but also intrinsic and attached to your React tree.
    2. Component state can only be shared by pushing it up to the common ancestor, but this might include a huge tree that then needs to re-render.
    3. For reasons of compatibility and simplicity, it's best to use React's built-in state management capabilities rather than external global state.
  5. Sep 2020
    1. The state is a data structure that starts with a default value when a Component mounts. It may be mutated across time, mostly as a result of user events.

      The state is a data structure with a default value at the start which can be mutated based on user events.

  6. Jul 2020
  7. Jan 2020
  8. Nov 2019
    1. However, again you would have to lift state up to the App component in order to pass the amount to the currency components. As you can see, the component composition on its own doesn't help us to solve the problem. That's the point where React's render props pattern comes into play which enhances React's component composition with an important ingredient: a render function.
    2. But it's not that simple, because the currency components don't know about the amount now. You would have to lift the state from the Amount component to the App component.
    1. It makes sense that the incoherent render would not be committed to browser and that it would not have any consequences most of the time. But that means that you render logic must be ready to manage incoherency between props and states without crashing. E.g. a list of resource ids in props that doesn't match a list of http requests from a previous id list in the state could lead to weird situations. This is a worry that didn't exist in class components.
    1. you can update the state right during rendering. React will re-run the component with updated state immediately after exiting the first render so it wouldn’t be expensive
  9. Oct 2019
    1. However, if more control is needed, you can pass any of these pieces of state as a prop (as indicated above) and that state becomes controlled. As soon as this.props[statePropKey] !== undefined, internally, downshift will determine its state based on your prop's value rather than its own internal state.
  10. Sep 2019
    1. The question is not “when does this effect run” the question is “with which state does this effect synchronize with”