3 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2020
    1. The purpose of the Orion group, as mentioned before, is conquest and enslavement. This is done by finding and establishing an elite and causing others to serve the elite through various devices such as the laws you mention and others given by this entity.

      Dominance through Elites. This is a grievous danger. We've seen a constant perversion of Genesis 1:27-28 (fruitful, multiply, dominate earth) by those who see this charge as an exclusive office rather than a "law" to be governed through 3rd density complexes! Dominion was designed to be a service to 2nd density and the way toward 4th Density for those in 3rd: NOT SERVICE TO SELF!

  2. Jul 2020
    1. The dominion of man over animal that this naming manifests thus comes before original sin and the Fall,6

      There's the argument about whether man's dominion over animals signifies man's power over animals to do as he pleases, or whether it means a responsibility to protect & nurture these animals. This is explored within the context of vegetarianism/veganism as a moral quandary for Christians.

  3. Mar 2017
    1. Canadian Wildlife Service

      The Canadian Wildlife Service organization was originally founded under the name of the Dominion Wildlife Service in November 1947. There were about thirty staff members of the organization at this time. In 1950, the organization’s name was changed to its current title of the Canadian Wildlife Service. The three main focuses of the Canadian Wildlife Service have been and continue to be the management of migratory birds, the management of game and furbearing mammals, and the enforcement of international treaties to ensure conservation of species. In order to accomplish these tasks, the Canadian Wildlife Service has conducted extensive research regarding population, population ecology, survival factors, migration patterns, limnological studies, environmental toxicology, and endangered species evaluation and protection of several species of the Arctic. Examples of these species include elk, moose, bison, caribou, muskoxen, polar bears, wolves, arctic foxes, geese, ducks, songbirds, seabirds, trumpeter swans, whooping cranes, and peregrine falcons. Additionally, the Canadian Wildlife Service has been tasked with the management of National Parks and the creation of public education programs (Burnett et al. 1999).

      During the 1970s, the Canadian Wildlife Service researched and reported on the reproductive success of the black-crowned night heron on Pigeon Island of Lake Ontario (Price 1978), biology of the Kaminuriak population of barren-ground caribou (Arctic 1977), hunting of and attacks by polar bears along the Manitoba coast of Hudson Bay (Jonkel et al. 1976), biology and management of bears (Bears: Their Biology and Management 1976), and many other environmental and biological concerns regarding the wildlife of the Arctic.

      Additional information and the current contact information of the Canadian Wildlife Service can be found at: https://www.ec.gc.ca/paom-itmb/default.asp?lang=En&n=5f569149-1.

      References

      "Books Received." Arctic 30, no. 1 (1977): 67-68.<br> http://www.jstor.org/stable/40508780.

      Burnett, J. A., and Canadian Wildlife Service. 1999. A Passion for Wildlife: A History of the Canadian Wildlife Service, 1947-1997 and Selected Publications from Work by the Canadian Wildlife Service. Canadian field-naturalist, v. 113, no. 1; Canadian field-naturalist, v. 113, no. 1.

      Jonkel, Charles, Ian Stirling, and Richard Robertson. "The Popular Bears of Cape Churchill." Bears: Their Biology and Management 3 (1976): 301-02. doi:10.2307/3872777.

      "Preface." Bears: Their Biology and Management 3 (1976): 7. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3872749.

      Price, Iola. "Black-Crowned Night Heron Reproductive Success on Pigeon Island, Lake Ontario 1972- 1977 (Abstract Only)." Proceedings of the Colonial Waterbird Group 1 (1978): 166. doi:10.2307/1520916.