9 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2024
  3. johnhalbrooks.substack.com johnhalbrooks.substack.com
    1. The fire completely consumed some of them, but among the survivors, though badly singed around the edges, was a curious book known as the Nowell Codex, which formed part of a volume labeled “Cotton MS Vitellius A XV.” (Robert Cotton, who had collected the manuscripts a century before, categorized his books with the busts of Roman emperors, which sat atop his shelves—hence, “Vitellius.”)

      Robert Cotton's library had busts of Roman emperors atop his shelves, and he used their names as part of his indexing system to be able to associate books' locations to make them findable.

  4. Jun 2022
    1. Until about 1780 to 1790, the WestIndies and especially Saint-Domingue were the primary cottonproducers. After the collapse of the plantations on Saint-Dominguefollowing the slave revolt of 1791, the US South took up the torchand pushed the acquisition of slaves and the capacity for cotton pro-duction to unprecedented levels
    2. Sven Beckert’s research on the “cotton empire” has also shown thecrucial importance of slave labor in the extraction of cotton when theBritish and Europeans seized control over worldwide textile pro-duction between 1750 and 1860.
  5. May 2022
    1. William Mather’s 1699 Young Man’s Companion

      Is there any familial relation between William Mather and Cotton Mather or his family?

      If there is, this could be even more damning. A quick search indicates that William Mather was a schoolmaster and may have been a Quaker. This means that a highly religious schoolmaster was teaching and spreading ideas about abortion in 1699.

  6. Feb 2022
  7. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. consoling herself, however, with the discovery, which her keen eye soon made, that the lace on Mrs. Thorpe’s pelisse was not half so handsome as that on her own.

      The pelisse, a popular garment most recently revived through the iconic yellow model worn by Ana Taylor-Joy in Autumn de Wilde’s Emma (2020), might be included as a footnote in the twin history of fashion and ecological degradation.

      By donning a pelisse, Mrs. Allen and Mrs. Thorpe, whatever their rivalries, were both at the cusp of early nineteenth-century fashion. Austen herself owned at least two pelisses, as historian Hilary Davidson has demonstrated. The pelisse, an overdress, was developed partly in response to the new Empire-period silhouette and partly due the “muslin disease” or influenza that ailed young women wearing fashionable lightweight fabrics in freezing weather.

      In the colder months, pelisses could be lined with fur, so Mrs. Allen’s observation that Mrs. Thorpe’s lace is not as handsome would indicate that this scene takes place in the warmer months. The pelisse’s popularity led it to replace the fur cloaks of the earlier eighteenth century. Soon, though, pelisses themselves would be replaced with fur coats, which gained popularity throughout the nineteenth century, reaching a high point in the 1850s. Their popularity was in large part due to new methods of processing fur, which made it more supple (Fashioned 86). The consumption of fur and sealskin jackets, as well as feathers and cotton, throughout the period would lead to the devastation (e.g., India’s cotton industry) of ecosystems (71).

      As we read these lines, then, we are reminded, of Austen’s critical eye for the consumer habits of her time. Although her critique here pertains to petty fashion rivalry, when reading about fashion items in her novels, we might find ourselves considering not only how little our fashion rivalries have changed but also how fashion and environmental degradation are historically linked.

      For more on the pelisse, the spencer, and muslin, head over to Austenprose to read Hilary Davidson's post on Regency fashion in Emma (2020).

      Works Cited

  8. Oct 2020
    1. Cotton—more than anyone or anything else—economically freed American enslavers from England and tightened the chains of African people in American slavery.
  9. Nov 2015
  10. Oct 2015
    1. II. The Importance of Cotton

      Study Questions:

      What impact does the discovery of "petit Gulf" cotton and the invention of the cotton gin have on western expansion?

      How do advancements in transportation effect the production of cotton and its expansion?