4 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2018
    1. When comparing themselves to women ofthe dominant culture, they thought the sentimental order(Glaser & Strauss, 1971) or cultural right way of doing thingswas to be stronger

      because sarah couldn't be stronger this made her hair fall out. not necesarily the cause but its a factor. her lack of blackness devoids her of her "strength". "the cultural way of doing things was to be stronger" Sarah didn't have that mindset to be stronger. furthermore, neither did the queen. She is the dominant culture and she seem's to be one of the dominant "selves" in sarah.

      Sarah's loss of crown is because she was dwelling on her life as a caucasion

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  2. Mar 2018
    1. hypertension, heart disease, stomach ills,respiratory difficulties, and depressive episodes, often referred to as ner-vous breakdowns

      does this :internalization" process also contribute to the depressive episodes?

      In order to maintain their image of a strong black woman, black women mask those behaviors which may make them seem weak. aka "internalizing" them.

      this now makes more sinse as to why her initial breakdown is in her apartment in the first place. she only becomes other parts of herselves when she's alone.

    2. the content (metaphors, recurring images, narratives) and the format ofspeech (disavowals, changes in volume, and contradictions) to identifyhow individual speakers mark their proximity to and distance from cul-tural discourses.

      Can these distinctions be found in a close reading of Sarah's other selves? what is there proximity to and distance from cultural discoruses

      Must read "The listening Guide"

  3. Jan 2017
    1. That’s not to say that social media curbs our self-awareness, or that our internet selves aren’t highly artificial and curated. Nor that people living in oppressive regimes, or as minorities in societies where they know they will be targeted, aren’t justifiably anxious about what they say online. But the point remains that digital media have radically transformed our conceptions of intimacy and shame, and they’ve done so in ways that are unpredictable and paradoxical.