10 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Make simple changes to (some carefully chosen fork of) any project in an afternoon, no matter how large it is. Gain an hour’s worth of understanding for an hour’s worth of effort, rather than a quantum leap in understanding after a week or month of effort.

      Accessibility is more important, after all, than Kartik says it is (elsewhere; cf recent Mastodon posts).

  2. Jan 2022
    1. <a href="https://web.hypothes.is/help/" class="hyp-u-horizontal-spacing--2 hyp-u-layout-row--center HelpPanel-tabs__link" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><span>Help topics</span>

      How to get remote control over the Hypothesis sidebar (one way, at least):

      1. Use the bookmarklet to open the sidebar
      2. Click the sidebar's "Help" icon in the top right
      3. Right click the "Help topics" link and select "Inspect" in the context menu to open the element in the browser devtools
      4. Remove "noopener" from the link (easiest way is to just delete the element's "rel" attribute)
      5. Change the link target to something other than "_blank" (e.g. "foobar")
      6. In the sidebar, click the now-modified "Help topics" link
      7. For good measure, in the new tab that opens, navigate to the same URL loaded in the sidebar (should be something like https://hypothes.is/app.html with a site-specific URL fragment; you can get the actual URL from the devtools JS console with document.documentURI, or right-clicking the sidebar and selecting "View Frame Info")

      From the secondary tab ("foobar" opened by click in step #6) you should now have unrestricted, scriptable access to the DOM of the original sidebar iframe, using e.g. the JS console in devtools instance or a bookmarklet applied to the secondary tab—access it as window.opener.

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  3. Oct 2021
    1. Ungar, around @1:00:00:

      I try to explain to people that the notion of compiler is broken. Of course I learned this from Smalltalk, but what we want to build is experiences--artificial realities that convince you that your source code is real. It's directly executed. There's no lag between editing and running[...] The environment stresses things in your program, not tools--which is another rant I have. It's this whole idea that we want to put you in an artificial reality--I got that from Randy [Smith]--in which it's easy and natural and low-cognitive-burden to get the computer to do what you want it to do, rather than running language translators that turn weird strings of text into bits the machine can run

  4. Sep 2021
    1. I don’t even minify page assets

      Good. Don't. The number of people who think this is a virtue is frightening. The rationale is usually not well-reasoned and whatever values they pretend to hold can almost always be shown to be hollow.

  5. Jul 2021
    1. The world could benefit from a curated set of bookmarklets in the style of Smalltalk ("doIt", "printIt", etc buttons) that you can place in your bookmarks bar (or copy into a bookmarks document and open in it in your browser), where the purpose would be to allow you to:

      1. access a new scratch area (about:blank) for experimentation
      2. make it editable, or make any given element on a page editable
      3. let you evaluate any code written into the scratch space

      scratch.js aims for something something similar, and though laudable it falls short of what I actually crave (and what I imagine would be be most beneficial/appreciated by the public).

  6. Apr 2021
    1. This project will be great for instruction and portable reproducible science

      This is what I'm aiming for with triplescripts.org. Initially, I'm mostly focused on the reproducibility the build process for software. In principle, it can encompass all kinds of use, and I actually want it to, but for practical reasons I'm trying to go for manageable sized bites instead of very large ones.

  7. Mar 2021
    1. multi-dimensional erector set that we're going forever

      "A multi-dimensional erector set that will go on forever..."

      No, unfortunately not forever.

  8. Sep 2020
    1. The idea of a web browser being something we can comprehend, of a web page being something that more people can make, feels exciting to me.

      my personal hope is that we can build a more sensible coherent web, that exudes the machines inside of it, by better harkening towards custom elements ("webcomponents"). move the page from being a bunch of machines in javascript, to a bunch of machines in hypertext.

      and then build pages that start to expose & let the user play with the dom. start to build experiences that bridge the gap into the machine/page.

      and keep going. keep going. build wilder web experiences. build more machines. and keep building battlesuits for the user, out of more componenets, out of more web, to let them wrestle & tangle with & manipulate & experiment & hack on & see & observe & learn about the truthful, honest, direct hypertext that we all navigate.

  9. May 2020
    1. Don’t go to code academy, go to design academy. Be advocates of the user & consumer. It’s not about learning how to code, it’s about translating real-world needs to technological specifications in just ways that give end users agency and equity in design, development and delivery. Be a champion of user-centric design. Learn how to steward data and offer your help.

      The importance of learning to design, and interpreting/translating real-world needs.

  10. Dec 2017
    1. A mental map (or cognitive map) is our mental representation of a place. It includes features we consider important, and is likely to exclude features we consider unimportant.

      (Urban planner Kevin Lynch, early 1960s)<br> Elements of mental maps

      • paths
      • edges - boundaries and endings
      • nodes - focal points like squares and junctions
      • districts
      • landmarks

      Modern maps could use augmented and virtual reality to help clarify those elements, making a place easier to navigate and use. But they can also add useless noise that makes the place seem more confusing than it actually is.