2 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. Miracles are everyone's right, but purification is necessary first.

      Fear not the images related to this word your memories have brought. Recall what author said in introduction: removing blocks to love is Course's one concern.

      You're not in need of adding content to your mind. A sculptor's masterpiece is ready only when everything unnecessary is removed. Let all illusions be dispelled off you and there is nothing left but love.

      Your task is not to seek for love, but merely to seek and find all of the barriers within yourself that you have built against it. T-16.4.6

      You are only love, but when you deny this, you make what you are something you must learn to remember. T-6.3.2

      Healing is not creating; it is reparation. T-5.2.1

      The miracle does nothing. All it does is to undo ... It does not add, but merely takes away. T-28.1.1

      The Atonement does not make holy. You were created holy. It merely brings unholiness to holiness; or what you made to what you are. Bringing illusion to truth, or the ego to God, is the Holy Spirit's only function. T-14.9.1

      All your past except its beauty is gone, and nothing is left but a blessing. T-5.4.8

  2. May 2019
    1. the destiny of the Greek version of the story, Hyppolitus,is to die and his life ends here. A god is involved. Compared to Syawash's story where no divine intervention or supernatural power was involved. "Theseus returns and discovers his wife's dead body. Because the chorus is sworn to secrecy, they cannot tell Theseus why she killed herself. Theseus discovers a letter on Phaedra's body, which falsely asserts that she was raped by Hippolytus. Enraged, Theseus curses his son either to death or at least exile. To execute the curse, Theseus calls upon his father, the god Poseidon, who has promised to grant his son three wishes. Hippolytus enters and protests his innocence but cannot tell the truth because of the binding oath that he swore. Taking his wife's letter as proof, Theseus exiles his son." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippolytus_(play), acess 5/7/19). However, Ferdowsi, in Shahnameh portrayes the Persian hero's fate differently. CC BY-NC-ND