10 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
  2. Jul 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. “paying for the regular delivery of well-defined value” — are so important. I defined every part of that phrase: Paying: A subscription is an ongoing commitment to the production of content, not a one-off payment for one piece of content that catches the eye. Regular Delivery: A subscriber does not need to depend on the random discovery of content; said content can be delivered to to the subscriber directly, whether that be email, a bookmark, or an app. Well-defined Value: A subscriber needs to know what they are paying for, and it needs to be worth it.
    2. It is very important to clearly define what a subscriptions means. First, it’s not a donation: it is asking a customer to pay money for a product. What, then, is the product? It is not, in fact, any one article (a point that is missed by the misguided focus on micro-transactions). Rather, a subscriber is paying for the regular delivery of well-defined value. The importance of this distinction stems directly from the economics involved: the marginal cost of any one Stratechery article is $0. After all, it is simply text on a screen, a few bits flipped in a costless arrangement. It makes about as much sense to sell those bit-flipping configurations as it does to sell, say, an MP3, costlessly copied. So you need to sell something different. In the case of MP3s, what the music industry finally learned — after years of kicking and screaming about how terribly unfair it was that people “stole” their music, which didn’t actually make sense because digital goods are non-rivalrous — is that they should sell convenience. If streaming music is free on a marginal cost basis, why not deliver all of the music to all of the customers for a monthly fee? This is the same idea behind nearly every large consumer-facing web service: Netflix, YouTube, Facebook, Google, etc. are all predicated on the idea that content is free to deliver, and consumers should have access to as much as possible. Of course how they monetize that convenience differs: Netflix has subscriptions, while Google, YouTube, and Facebook deliver ads (the latter two also leverage the fact that content is free to create). None of them, though, sell discrete digital goods. It just doesn’t make sense.
  4. Mar 2020
  5. Jan 2020
  6. Oct 2019
    1. In the front row, an older lady was reading Summer's End by Danielle Steele.

      That same woman attends the event every year and is known to bring along the SMH to read. Seems she's realised her choice had come down to two mostly-fictional items of content and chose to join the growing cohort of ex-readers. Sorry you had to find out this way.

      On a positive note, this woman is clearly a candidate for one of the SMH's super duper 80 per cent off subscription deals.

      You should go and personally save this reader so that you get a good mention from management at the upcoming staff retrenchment function.

  7. Apr 2019
    1. A Dream in the Dark is a collection of twelve digital live albums spanning two decades – from Okkervil River’s earliest shows up to the present day. It presents a comprehensive history of the band through the lens of concerts instead of studio albums, and it draws from a massive archive of recordings catalogued by Will Sheff and by fans throughout the years.

      This is utterly worth it. I've yet to see a collection so painstakingly collated, with so much extras in one single package - and that's only the first one, which is so far the sole release out there!

      This'll be like xmas, Summer holidaze, and Okkervil playing your living room, all at once!

  8. Jul 2018