21 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. the ghcjs compiler. But it was a real pain, I Haskell but it's just getting it to install and run and compile, it's just kind of a nightmare
  2. Jun 2021
    1. "I really appreciate the name change [because] it raises awareness," said Javier Cánovas, assistant professor in the SOM Research Lab, at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute at the Open University of Catalonia in Barcelona. "There are things that we accept as implicit, and we then realize that we can change them because they don't match our society."
  3. May 2021
    1. The implicit dependencies between different versions of different services were not expressed anywhere, which led to various problems in building, continuous integration, and, notably, repeatable builds.
  4. Apr 2021
    1. Hidden affordances are implicit features of an object. The clues that indicate an items function are not obvious and may not even be displayed until the action is being taken.
  5. Mar 2021
  6. Feb 2021
    1. Something that is implicit is inferred - it is suggested by the way it is said. Implicit meaning can be harder to figure out than explicit meaning.
    1. While each of these two words has several possible meanings, they are notably distinct from each other in all senses. Denotation is concerned with explicit meaning, and connotation tends to be concerned with implicit meaning.
    1. An intent filter is an expression in an app's manifest file that specifies the type of intents that the component would like to receive. For instance, by declaring an intent filter for an activity, you make it possible for other apps to directly start your activity with a certain kind of intent. Likewise, if you do not declare any intent filters for an activity, then it can be started only with an explicit intent.
    2. Implicit intents do not name a specific component, but instead declare a general action to perform, which allows a component from another app to handle it. For example, if you want to show the user a location on a map, you can use an implicit intent to request that another capable app show a specified location on a map.
  7. Jan 2021
  8. Sep 2020
  9. May 2020
    1. Explicit Form (where the purpose of the sign-up mechanism is unequivocal). So for example, in a scenario where your site has a pop-up window that invites users to sign up to your newsletter using a clear phrase such as: “Subscribe to our newsletter for access to discount vouchers and product updates!“, the affirmative action that the user performs by typing in their email address would be considered valid consent.
    1. In the US, there is no one national law in regards to returns/refunds for purchases made online as in most cases, this is implemented on a state-by-state basis, however, under several state-laws, if no refund or return notice was made visible to consumers before purchase, consumers are automatically granted extended return/refund rights. In cases where the item purchased is defective, an implied warranty may apply in lieu of a written warranty
  10. Feb 2019
    1. g likelihood or Bayesian probabilistic phylogene

      If you have a molecular data partition, you can just use total evidence approach and the standard 1-parameter Markov model.

      Potential synapomorphies will be compatible with the molecular tree and considered not likely to change. Potential homoiologies and symplesiomorphies are partly ("semi-")compatible with the molecular tree and, hence, considered less likely to change than highly homoplastic traits with (random) convergence.

      Just try out a couple of datasets, and infer the (Bio)NJ and ML trees and then compare the result with the strict consensus network (not tree) of all equally parsimonious trees and the Bayesian tree sample.

      Note that if you apply TNT's iterative character weighting procedure, what you effectively do is sorting the random convergences from parallelisms/ characters that are more compatible with the preferred tree.

  11. Oct 2018
    1. They are all the same.

      This remark about "The French" is funny to analyze... I have fallen victim to this homogenous way of thinking. This is something very easily done. When we use micro aggressions, we often de-value or minimize individuals implicitly. This is sad, but can often be harmful, even if it is indirect.

  12. Nov 2017
    1. Education generates habits of application, order and the love of virtue; and controuls, by the force of habit, any innate obliquities in our moral organization.

      This is a very powerful statement regarding the purpose of higher education. The commissioners of the university clearly had a vision for how the education that the university provided should affect its students. However, the statement is somewhat idealistic in that it includes the idea that education will drive out any "innate" or subconscious deviations from morality. We all know that this was certainly not achieved at the time of the university's founding, when the practice of owning slaves was perceived as moral, and also has not been achieved today, although UVA has introduced many new efforts to combat this problem. Through the university's response to the Unite the Right rally this summer, the numerous implicit bias modules and presentations it offers, and the engagements themselves, our "innate obliquities" are being discussed and brought to light so that we as a university can take deliberate steps towards achieving this ideal view of education put forth by the commissioners of UVA. Claire Waterhouse

  13. Jul 2016
  14. Jun 2016
    1. Title: Is Polite Philosophical Discussion Possible? (guest post by Nomy Arpaly) - Daily Nous

      Keywords: implicit bias, philosophical discussion, war crimes, moral inhibitions—

      Summary: For brevity’s sake, let’s just say it’s a big part of politeness or civility not to correct people.<br>A soldier who is fighting, even for a just cause, is in a precarious situation, with regard to morality, because he has lost, of necessity, the basic moral inhibition against killing people.<br>A philosopher who is arguing with another, even in pursuit of truth, is in a precarious situation with regard to politeness, because she has lost, of necessity, the basic civil inhibition against correcting people.<br>Having lost, of necessity, the inhibition against killing people, some soldiers find themselves shedding other moral inhibitions—and committing war crimes.<br>Having lost, of necessity, the inhibition against correcting people, some philosophers find themselves shedding other social inhibitions—and being terribly, terribly rude.<br>That’s just the nature of inhibition loss.<br>You need the real thing.<br>Being compelled to break the rule of thumb against telling people that they are mistaken in the understanding of an important thing is no excuse for also yelling at them, repeatedly interrupting them and talking over them, responding to their painstakingly prepared talks with a sneering “why should I be interested in any of this”?<br>Furthermore, I will argue against the philosophical Henry Kissinger within many of us who worries that whatever might be true about war and war crimes, realistically speaking philosophical rigor just requires rudeness.<br>It’s clearly a vice, virtue ethicists would say.<br>I would like to add the following.<br>First, if everyone is rude, women are judged unfairly (as potential colleagues, for example) because rude women are treated more harshly than rude men, by everyone, due to implicit bias.<br>Again, changing behavior is much easier than changing implicit bias.<br>Some think philosophy should change here—either through what I called “pacifism” earlier or through changing the way we evaluate people, or otherwise.<br>It won’t solve everything, but if we reduce rudeness, I solemnly promise that more women will want to do philosophy.<br>It is shown most emphatically by downright quiet, mild-mannered philosophers whose objections, expressed in a nice tone of voice, are nonetheless absolutely lethal.<br>They say revenge is best served cold.<br>Philosophical discussion can legitimately feel like a very tiring game of squash.<br>(Vincent Van Gogh, detail of “Four Cut Sunflowers”)<br>

  15. Oct 2015
    1. 15. Your Name Determines What You Buy And Do, And You Need To Know

      This claim is very credible and there is extensive literature on the subject. In particular, there is an article written by Frederik Anseel and Wouter Duyck which validates the claim made in the *Cracked* article in respect to the Name-Letter Effect and how it influences where one might choose to work as well as career of choice.
       Anseel and Duyck obtained information from the Belgian Social Security Administration containing the names of 1/3 of all the employees working in the private sector in Belgium, with their aim being to determine if the employees' choice of employment could be statistically proven to be linked to the N.L.E. Anseel and Duyck confirmed the N.L.E was a factor, and the numbers support that these people were more likely to choose employment with companies with matching initials, with rarer initials have a greater likelihood(Anseel & Duyck, 2008). Overall, the authors discovered that the same-letter matches were 11.84% higher that projected at the start of the study(Anseel & Duyck, 2008).
      

      There is also an article published in Current Directions in Psychological Science which speaks to the Implicit Egotism claim. In the article Implicit Egotism, Pelham, Carvallo, & Jones state that implicit egotism is a tendency to live in places and associate with people who resemble the self (2005). The authors cite the work previously done by men such as Jozef Nuttin, credited with the origination of the N.L.E. theory, and take it a step further. They found that people were found to live states in the U.S. that most resembled their names (e.g. Louise and Louisiana or Virginia and Virginia). Pelham et al., found this out by examining the Social Security Death Index. It was discovered that when these people registered for Social Security as adults, the results supported that people more often inhabited states that were similar to their own names. In addition to that, the authors of Implicit Egotism also found evidence that people are also more inclined to associate and be attracted to people with whom shared initials are found. These findings back up the statements made in the Cracked article concerning implicit egotism and it’s influence on judgments that dictate our associations in society.

      Here’s the link to the article Name-Letter Effect article: http://web.b.ebscohost.com.libprox1.slcc.edu/ehost/detail/detail?vid=11&sid=e5b7258a-ee9a-4178-bd5a-86226cffed35%40sessionmgr111&hid=128&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=35068858&db=aph

      Here's the link to the Implicit Egotism study: http://web.b.ebscohost.com.libprox1.slcc.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=13&sid=e5b7258a-ee9a-4178-bd5a-86226cffed35%40sessionmgr111&hid=128
      
  16. Jun 2015
    1. But these studies on the halo effect of attractiveness, should make us suspicious that there may be a similar halo effect for kindness, or intelligence.

      You can identify your halos and pitchforks. These are the attributes that cause you to be most easily and unconsciously drawn into the halo effect and they are known as implicit biases.