14 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
  2. Apr 2020
  3. Jan 2020
    1. login shell: A login shell logs you into the system as a specific user, necessary for this is a username and password. When you hit ctrl+alt+F1 to login into a virtual terminal you get after successful login: a login shell (that is interactive). Sourced files: /etc/profile and ~/.profile for Bourne compatible shells (and /etc/profile.d/*) ~/.bash_profile for bash /etc/zprofile and ~/.zprofile for zsh /etc/csh.login and ~/.login for csh non-login shell: A shell that is executed without logging in, necessary for this is a current logged in user. When you open a graphic terminal in gnome it is a non-login (interactive) shell. Sourced files: /etc/bashrc and ~/.bashrc for bash interactive shell: A shell (login or non-login) where you can interactively type or interrupt commands. For example a gnome terminal (non-login) or a virtual terminal (login). In an interactive shell the prompt variable must be set ($PS1). Sourced files: /etc/profile and ~/.profile /etc/bashrc or /etc/bash.bashrc for bash non-interactive shell: A (sub)shell that is probably run from an automated process you will see neither input nor output when the calling process don't handle it. That shell is normally a non-login shell, because the calling user has logged in already. A shell running a script is always a non-interactive shell, but the script can emulate an interactive shell by prompting the user to input values. Sourced files: /etc/bashrc or /etc/bash.bashrc for bash (but, mostly you see this at the beginning of the script: [ -z "$PS1" ] && return. That means don't do anything if it's a non-interactive shell). depending on shell; some of them read the file in the $ENV variable.
    1. then if your system does not source ~/.bashrc by default via /etc/profile you should source it in ~/.bash_profile file so any login shell will have access also to the same environment like non login sessions.
    2. When you execute commands in non login shell like ssh server command or scp file server:~ or sudo(without -i) or su (without -l) it will execute ~/.bashrc
  4. Aug 2019
    1. Integrating social media accounts with websites and Apps is the latest trend in the field of web designing. Wouldn’t the whole process of creating usernames and passwords for your website get simplified when users can easily connect to your website with their Facebook credentials? Enabling Facebook Login for WordPress website helps you in targeting your website visitors more effectively on Facebook. Also at the same time, it brings a wealth of information about the user such as demographic attributes, interests and other characteristics. It speeds up the whole process of user registration without having to worry about forgotten passwords, misspelled email addresses, or unreliable data sources. It is a transparent way to gather user information after their consent, where the users don’t have to remember a bunch of usernames and passwords to log into your website. 

      Enabling Facebook Login for WordPress website helps you in targeting your website visitors more effectively on Facebook.

  5. Feb 2019
  6. Jan 2018
  7. Dec 2017
    1. Click here

      These instructions will be removed whenever the login portal is live.

  8. Apr 2016
    1. A delegated solution means that one site is simply outsourcing its authentication needs to another pre-selected site. If your site uses Facebook Connect, you are delegating your authentication facilities to Facebook. Visitors to your site cannot use any other accounts, only accounts from the vendors you have pre-selected. A federated solution means that visitors to your site can use any account they have, as long as it is compatible. It makes no difference to the site which account is being used, as long as it can interoperate. At its core, OpenID is a federated solution because its most important feature is the ability to use any OpenID account with any OpenID-enabled service. A good example is stores accepting credit cards. A store that accepts any Visa card is using federated payments – payments from any account that “speaks Visa”. But a store that accepts only credit cards issued by a specific vendor, for example, a department store branded card, use delegated payments. The reason why you no longer see many stores accepting only their own credit cards, is because it is bad for business. But not every OpenID implementation is federated, and this is the big dilemma OpenID has to resolve. The question is, can users use any account they want? If a site uses the Yahoo! OpenID service by using the Yahoo! button: but does not offer the ability to use other vendors, it is really just another delegated solution, even if it is powered by OpenID under the hood. In this case, OpenID becomes just a technical detail of the implementation, not part of its design. Much of the recent discussion about OpenID usability centers around using brands as a way to make the service more usable. But the problem with this approach is that is takes away most of the federated value out of OpenID, leaving it simply as a common protocol to implement proprietary delegated services. When implemented this way, OpenID adds no real value to services with an OAuth API. The question which solution to use for sign-in, OpenID or OAuth, is very much application specific. If you are building a brand new site that needs accounts, and want to leverage existing accounts from services such as Google, Yahoo!, and Microsoft, OpenID is a great option that will give your users a lot of flexibility. But if you are extending an existing service, implementing a specific API and building a site that has great dependencies on another service, OAuth gives you everything you need, for very little extra work. It is all about using the right tool for the job.
  9. Apr 2015
  10. Jan 2015