4 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2018
    1. As Ali explained it to me, for him, January 25, 2011, was in many ways an ordinary January 25—officially a “police celebration day,” but traditionally a day of protest. Although he was young, he was a veteran activist. He and a small group of fellow activists gathered each year in Tahrir on January 25 to protest police brutality. January 25, 2011, was not their first January 25 pro-test, and many of them expected something of a repeat of their earlier protests—perhaps a bit larger this year.

      This mirrors the story of the rape that preceded the Rosa Parks protests in Alabama several years prior and helped set the stage for that being successful.

      It's often frequent that bigger protests are staged to take place on dates/times that have historical meaning.

    2.  turned on the television only once, wanting to see how networks were covering the historic moment of Mubarak’s resignation. CNN was broad-casting an aerial shot of the square. The camera shot from far above the square was jarring because I had been following it all on Twitter, person by person, each view necessarily incomplete but also intimate. On television, all I could see was an undifferentiated mass of people, an indistinct crowd. It felt cold and alienating. The television pictures did not convey how today’s networked protests operate or feel
  2. Nov 2016
    1. EFF guide to attending protests, especially how to handle smartphones. (Part of the guide to surveillance self-defense.)

    1. Gotta get down to itSoldiers are cutting us down

      Students today can’t imagine why the students didn’t just leave. They don’t see protesting as part of the First Amendment (Rosenburg, David. Slate Magazine. 4 May 2013.