3 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2016
    1. If, then, there be liberty, men get from her just in proportion to their works, and their having and enjoying are just in proportion to their being and their doing.

      During this time the Captains of Industry/Robber Barons were gaining power and wealth. The idea that these men were working harder than others was severely skewed. All of the richest men at the time were creating their monopoly and money off of the backs of the working class. Exploiting this class was commonplace, forcing workers to work 10+ hour shifts in dangerous situations for minimal pay. Sumner's idea that work is proportional to success shows a lack of understanding of the conditions of the working class.

    2. It is impossible that the man with capital and the man without capital should be equal. To affirm that they are equal would be to say that a man who has no tool can get as much food out of the ground as the man who has a spade or a plough; or that the man who has no weapon can defend himself as well against hostile beasts or hostile men as the man who has a weapon. If that were so, none of us would work any more.

      The sentence highlights the social inconsistency within the age of the second industrial revolution. At this time, social inequality was due to political corruption and how wealth was distributed. Thus, the man with capital had more power and wealth than the man who does not have capital. Also, what I found distinct about this quote is that Sumner contrasted it with the idea of the first paragraph, in which he stated and acknowledges that equality was possible if everyone could "share" the wealth and power, then inequality would be solved. However, by stating the quote (highlighted), there would be no work and that it was necessary to have men with capital because they are the propellers of success in society.

  2. Nov 2013
    1. Like any other discipline, the theory of invention and arrangement must be practiced in two ways: first, in order that by its means we should through external examples learn common sense from argument, judgment from the manner of conclusion, and complete prudence from the method of arrangement and order; secondly, that by means of the same art we should devise similar examples in speech and writing.

      Learn rhetoric through analyzing others and practicing what you've learned.