8 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2020
    1. 5The Missouri Model for Trauma-Informed SchoolsA school that only addresses the impact of trauma on students will struggle with staff burnout, turnover, and compassion fatigue. The science around trauma is clear: the most powerful resource for young people is a supportive, unwavering relationship with an adult. Adults in schools must be capable of being unwavering supports for students. This means addressing the vicarious and secondary trauma experienced by staff-not as an afterthought, but as a focal point of the trauma-informed journey.

      Important point.

  2. Nov 2020
    1. An accountability model of discipline employs behavioral supports and restorative practices to enable individuals to develop the skills they need to be successful in an educational setting.

      This shift toward "accountability" sounds like an interesting approach. What would a "restorative" model look like in course policies, or for academic infractions?

    1. Frustrating that putting a PDF in a frame seems to break Hypothesis. Saving for this quote, which I think is a pretty strong point which a lot of us are zipping past:

      "A school that only addresses the impact of trauma on students will struggle with staff burnout, turnover, and compassion fatigue. The science around trauma is clear: the most powerful resource for young people is a supportive, unwavering relationship with an adult. Adults in schools must be capable of being unwavering supports for students. This means addressing the vicarious and secondary trauma experienced by staff-not as an afterthought, but as a focal point of the trauma-informed journey."

    1. A trauma-informed pedagogy enables us to recognize that amid a pandemic, our students may have a difficult time completing basic tasks they normally would, including keeping track of the slightest changes in our classes, making decisions about their learning, being motivated to study or to show up, prioritizing assignments, engaging with classmates or the subject, managing their time, or simply not quitting.

      Interesting list - from the procedural to the motivational.

  3. Oct 2020
    1. Unfortunately, saying, "Build a relationship" is too vague and leaves too much up to the teacher's instincts.

      Not just in regards to students processing trauma, unfortunately...

  4. Apr 2020
    1. Sure. So I do want to start by just reminding listeners that talking about trauma, learning about trauma, can bring up some feelings, which is a very normal reaction to that. So I just want to remind people, if you notice that, that it’s okay to take a rain check on listening and engaging in this conversation. I also do recommend that even if you feel okay to engage with a discussion about trauma that it’s recommended that you do so in small doses, especially during these very challenging times.

      This is a lovely way to introduce this topic.

  5. Oct 2018
    1. teach-ers are generally not prepared to address the intersections of healing, politics, and emotion in classrooms.

      Nor are most of the teacher-educators working with pre-service teachers. And can we be fully prepared, any of us right now? I survived my own trauma through years of therapy and work, and I have learned a fair bit about socio-emotional learning and trauma-informed practice. But right now, my adopted city, Pittsburgh, is grappling with a massacre. I am aiming to act and lead from my heart; yet I am scattered, hurt, and deeply tired.